Women, Work and the Victorian Periodical

Women, Work and the Victorian Periodical

Author: Marianne Van Remoortel

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137435996

Category: Social Science

Page: 189

View: 474

Covering a wide range of magazine work, including editing, illustration, poetry, needlework instruction and typesetting, this book provides fresh insights into the participation of women in the nineteenth-century magazine industry.

The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900

The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900

Author: Walter E. Houghton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135795498

Category: History

Page: 1766

View: 631

`Simply a great work of reference. Future scholars will wonder how anybody managed without the Wellesley Index. It will quietly change the whole nature of Victorian studies.' Christopher Ricks, New Statesman `It is now impossible to think of Victorian literary and historical studies without the benefit of it ... this is a very remarkable achievement indeed ... the complete set will be a monument to the Houghtons foresight, pertinacity and skill.' TLS

Researching the Nineteenth-Century Periodical Press

Researching the Nineteenth-Century Periodical Press

Author: Alexis Easley

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317065500

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 220

View: 871

Extending the work of The Routledge Handbook to Nineteenth-Century British Periodicals and Newspapers, this volume provides a critical introduction and case studies that illustrate cutting-edge approaches to periodicals research, as well as an overview of recent developments in the field. The twelve chapters model diverse approaches and methodologies for research on nineteenth-century periodicals. Each case study is contextualized within one of the following broad areas of research: single periodicals, individual journalists, gender issues, periodical networks, genre, the relationship between periodicals, transnational/transatlantic connections, technologies of printing and illustration, links within a single periodical, topical subjects, science and periodicals, and imperialism and periodicals. Contributors incorporate first-person accounts of how they conducted their research and provide specific examples of how they gained access to primary sources, as well as the methods they used to analyze the materials.

How to Find Out About the Victorian Period

How to Find Out About the Victorian Period

Author: Lionel Madden

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 9781483153612

Category: Reference

Page: 188

View: 149

How to Find Out About the Victorian Period: A Guide to Sources of Information focuses on the Victorian period of Great Britain. The book first discusses the study of the Victorian period and general guides to the literature. The use of books, periodical articles, theses, and bibliographies in the study of this period in British history is emphasized. The text underscores the value of Victorian periodicals and newspapers in the study of the Victorian period. Guides to special collections and source materials on this period are discussed. These include guides to collection of books and manuscripts, libraries and their collections, archives and manuscripts, and government publications. The book also presents guides to the study of the Victorian church. These include encyclopedias and dictionaries, biographical works, and theses. Guides on the kind of education, development of science, visual arts, music, and literature of the Victorian period are also described. The text is a fine reference for readers who are interested in British history, particularly the Victorian era.

Tennyson and Victorian Periodicals

Tennyson and Victorian Periodicals

Author: Kathryn Ledbetter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317046240

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 244

View: 920

This is the first book-length study of Tennyson's record of publication in Victorian periodicals. Despite Tennyson's supposed hostility to periodicals, Ledbetter shows that he made a career-long habit of contributing to them and in the process revealed not only his willingness to promote his career but also his status as a highly valued commodity. Tennyson published more than sixty poems in serial publications, from his debut as a Cambridge prize-winning poet with "Timbuctoo" in the Cambridge Chronicle and Journal to his last public composition as Poet Laureate with "The Death of the Duke of Clarence and Avondale" in The Nineteenth Century. In addition, poems such as "The Charge of the Light Brigade" were shaped by his reading of newspapers. Ledbetter explores the ironies and tensions created by Tennyson's attitudes toward publishing in Victorian periodicals and the undeniable benefits to his career. She situates the poet in an interdependent commodity relationship with periodicals, viewing his individual poems as textual modules embedded in a page of meaning inscribed by the periodical's history, the poet's relationship with the periodical's readers, an image sharing the page whether or not related to the poem, and cultural contexts that create new meanings for Tennyson's work. Her book enriches not only our understanding of Tennyson's relationship to periodical culture but the textual implications of a poem's relationship with other texts on a periodical page and the meanings available to specific groups of readers targeted by individual periodicals.

Shakespeare in the Victorian Periodicals

Shakespeare in the Victorian Periodicals

Author: Kathryn Prince

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135896584

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 191

View: 788

Based on extensive archival research, Shakespeare in the Victorian Periodicals offers an entirely new perspective on popular Shakespeare reception by focusing on articles published in Victorian periodicals. Shakespeare had already reached the apex of British culture in the previous century, becoming the national poet of the middle and upper classes, but during the Victorian era he was embraced by more marginal groups. If Shakespeare was sometimes employed as an instrument of enculturation, imposed on these groups, he was also used by them to resist this cultural hegemony.

"The Art-Journal and Fine Art Publishing in Victorian England, 1850?880 "

Author: Katherine Haskins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351546287

Category: Art

Page: 226

View: 630

Focusing on an era that both inherited and irretrievably altered the form and the content of earlier art production, The Art-Journal and Fine Art Publishing in Victorian England, 1850-1880 argues that fine art practices and the audiences and markets for them were influenced by the media culture of art publishing and journalism in substantial and formative ways, perhaps more than at any other time in the history of English art. The study centers on forms of Victorian picture-making and the art knowledge systems defining them, and draws on the histories of art, literature, journalism, and publishing. The historical example employed in the book is that of the more than 800 steel-plate prints after paintings published in the London-based Art-Journal between 1850 and 1880. The cultural phenomenon of the Art Journal print is shown to be a key connector in mid-Victorian art appreciation by drawing out specific tropes of likeness. This study also examines the important links between paint and print; the aesthetic values and domestic aspirations of the Victorian middle class; and the inextricable intertwining of fine art and 'trade' publishing.

Serialization and the Novel in Mid-Victorian Magazines

Serialization and the Novel in Mid-Victorian Magazines

Author: Catherine Delafield

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317057017

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 222

View: 977

Examining the Victorian serial as a text in its own right, Catherine Delafield re-reads five novels by Elizabeth Gaskell, Anthony Trollope, Dinah Craik and Wilkie Collins by situating them in the context of periodical publication. She traces the roles of the author and editor in the creation and dissemination of the texts and considers how first publication affected the consumption and reception of the novel through the periodical medium. Delafield contends that a novel in volume form has been separated from its original context, that is, from the pattern of consumption and reception presented by the serial. The novel's later re-publication still bears the imprint of this serialized original, and this book’s investigation into nineteenth-century periodicals both generates new readings of the texts and reinstates those which have been lost in the reprinting process. Delafield's case studies provide evidence of the ways in which Household Words, Cornhill Magazine, Good Words, All the Year Round and Cassell's Magazine were designed for new audiences of novel readers. Serialization and the Novel in Mid-Victorian Magazines addresses the material conditions of production, illustrates the collective and collaborative creation of the serialized novel, and contextualizes a range of texts in the nineteenth-century experience of print.