U-Boat Killer

U-Boat Killer

Author: Captain Donald MacIntyre

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 9781839741456

Category: History

Page: 178

View: 198

U-Boat Killer, first published in 1956, is an exciting account of a British Royal Navy destroyer in World War II. Tasked with guarding vital Atlantic convoys and later commanding 'Hunter/Killer' groups, author Captain Donald MacIntyre (1904-1981) became a near-legend during the war, with 7 destroyed German submarines to his credit, as well as several U-boat captures. He also survived a torpedo hit, and, after ramming a U-boat, successfully piloted the damaged ship back to safety.

Hitler's U-Boat War

Hitler's U-Boat War

Author: Clay Blair

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780297866220

Category: History

Page: 976

View: 886

The second and final volume of the definitive account of the German submarine war. Acclaimed on its publication in 1997 ('should become the standard history of the Unterseeboote' - Washington Post) volume one of Clay Blair's magnum opus is here followed by volume two, The Hunted covering 1942-45. In this volume the fortunes of the German navy are completely reversed - due in no small part to Allied codebreaking - and they suffer perhaps the most devastating defeat of any of the Germany forces. destroying their submarine service entirely. Blair has been at work on this history for nine years since the British and American governments began to release official WWII records in the 1980s. Blair himself served in submarines in combat in WWII. He chronicles the U-Boat war with authority, fidelity, objectivity and extraordinary detail. He also writes vivid and dramatic scenes of naval actions and dispassionate, but startling new revelations, interpretations and conclusions about all aspects of the Battle of the Atlantic.

U-Boats at War in 100 Objects, 1939–1945

U-Boats at War in 100 Objects, 1939–1945

Author: Gordon Williamson

Publisher: Frontline Books

ISBN: 9781526759054

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 141

‘The only thing that ever really frightened me during the war was the U-boat peril,’ wrote Winston Churchill in his history of the Second World War. ‘I was even more anxious about this battle than I had been about the glorious air fight called the Battle of Britain.” In reality, the Kriegsmarine had been woefully unprepared for the war into which it was thrown. The Command-in-Chief of submarines, Karl Dönitz, himself a verteran U-boat captain from the First World War, felt that he could bring Britain to its knees with a fleet of 300 U-Boats. But when war broke out, he had just twenty-four available for operational use. Despite this, the U-Boat arm scored some incredible successes in the early part of the war, raising the status of the submarine commanders and crews to that of national heroes in the eyes of the German people. The ‘Grey Wolves’ had become super-stars. Small wonder then that the U-Boat war has fascinated students of military history ever since. This book, using a carefully selected range of both wartime images and colour images of surviving U-boat memorabilia from private collections, describes 100 iconic elements of the U-Boat service and its campaigns. The array of objects include important individuals and the major U-Boat types, through to the uniforms and insignias the men wore. The weapons, equipment and technology used are explored, as are the conditions in which the U-boat crews served, from cooking facilities and general hygiene down to the crude toilet facilities. Importantly, the enemy that they faced is also covered, examining the ship-borne and airborne anti-submarine weaponry utilised against the U-boats. The U-Boats began the war, though small in number, more than a match for the Allies and created carnage amongst merchant shipping as well as sinking several major warships. The pace of technological development, however, failed to match that of Allied anti-submarine warfare weaponry and the U-Bootwaffe was ultimately doomed to defeat but not before, at one point, coming close to bringing Britain to its knees.

Summary of Capt. Donald MacIntyre's U-Boat Killer

Summary of Capt. Donald MacIntyre's U-Boat Killer

Author: Everest Media,

Publisher: Everest Media LLC

ISBN: 9798822524774

Category: History

Page: 30

View: 725

Please note: This is a companion version & not the original book. Sample Book Insights: #1 I had been commissioned as Sub-Lieutenant in 1926, and in 1939 I was enjoying foreign service leave after returning from a two-year commission in command of the destroyer Defender on the China Station. I had spent the past thirteen years of service divided between destroyers and the Fleet Air Arm, two branches of the Navy that were ideally suited to give me the training necessary for the role I was destined to play in the war. #2 The years that followed in the Hermes on the China station and the Courageous at home were extremely enjoyable. But I chafed at the lack of appreciation of what aircraft could do. Gunnery was the naval officer’s god, and ex-gunnery officers occupied most of the positions on the Flag List. #3 The asdic is a device that sends out sound waves and picks up the same waves if they are reflected off an object and return to the receiver. The transmitter-receiver is immersed in water, and the conical sound beam it sends out is broad and deep. #4 The asdic was a device that could be used to search for submarines. It worked by sweeping across a broad arc from one side of the ship’s course to the other, stopping every few degrees to transmit a ping, and then listening for any echo coming back. If an echo was received, the sound beam was held on to it, the range and bearing were read off, and the course and speed of the target were passed to the plotting table.

Turning the Tide

Turning the Tide

Author: Ed Offley

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780465031641

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 873

At times, even his admirers seemed unsure of what to do with General Douglas MacArthur. Imperious, headstrong, and vain, MacArthur matched an undeniable military genius with a massive ego and a rebellious streak that often seemed to destine him for the dustbin of history. Yet despite his flaws, MacArthur is remembered as a brilliant commander whose combined-arms operation in the Pacific -- the first in the history of warfare -- secured America's triumph in World War II and changed the course of history. In The Most Dangerous Man in America, celebrated historian Mark Perry examines how this paradox of a man overcame personal and professional challenges to lead his countrymen in their darkest hour. As Perry shows, Franklin Roosevelt and a handful of MacArthur's subordinates made this feat possible, taming MacArthur, making him useful, and finally making him victorious. A gripping, authoritative biography of the Pacific Theater's most celebrated and misunderstood commander, The Most Dangerous Man in America reveals the secrets of Douglas MacArthur's success -- and the incredible efforts of the men who made it possible.

U-Boat Killer

U-Boat Killer

Author: Donald Macintyre

Publisher:

ISBN: 1104850559

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 262

View: 487

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

U-Boat Ace

U-Boat Ace

Author: Jordan Vause

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781784382773

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 258

Wolfgang Luth was one of only seven men to win Germany’s highest combat decoration. He operated in almost every theater of the undersea war from Norway to the Indian Ocean and he was the second most successful German U-boat ace in World War II. Luth is credited with sinking 47 Allied ships and a submarine – a record topped only by Otto Kretschmer. In 1944, after 16 war patrols, including one that lasted a record 203 days at sea, he was named the youngest Commandant of the German Naval Academy at age 30. Until the publication of this comprehensive study his accomplishments were overshadowed by other aces, to correct the neglect, Jordan Vause provides an entertaining, authoritative biography. Vause was intrigued after seeing a portrait of Luth as a midshipman on display and set out to learn all he could, tracking down some of Luth’s crewmen and fellow U-boat commanders. He draws on their firsthand information and a variety of written documents to provide a fascinating character analysis. In doing so, he encapsulates the paradoxes inherent in so many German submarine commanders, men spawned by the Nazi regime yet not entirely of it. Vause portrays Luth as a man of contradictions: an agent Nazi ideologue who could bend the rules for a slack sailor, a U-boat ace who could treat survivors of his attacks with clemency but then impetuously gun down other victims in cold blood. Even his best friend admitted that Luth had no remorse for the misery he inflicted on the crews of sunken ships. On the night of May 13th 1945 he was accidentally shot and killed by a German sentry. On May 16th 1945 he was given the Third Reich’s last state funeral.