The Kansa Indians

The Kansa Indians

Author: William E. Unrau

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806119659

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 483

After their first contacts with whites in the seventeenth century, the Kansa Indians began migrating from the eastern United States to what is now eastern Kansas, by way of the Missouri Valley. Settling in villages mostly along the Kansas River, they led a semi-sedentary life, raising corn and a few vegetables and hunting buffalo in the spring and fall. It was an idyllic existence-until bad, and then worse, things began to happen. William E. Unrau tells how the Kansa Indians were reduced from a proud people with a strong cultural heritage to a remnant forced against their will to take up the whites' ways. He gives a balanced but hard-hitting account of an important and tragic chapter in American history.

Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science

Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science

Author: Allen Kent

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 0824720393

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 454

View: 578

"The Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science provides an outstanding resource in 33 published volumes with 2 helpful indexes. This thorough reference set--written by 1300 eminent, international experts--offers librarians, information/computer scientists, bibliographers, documentalists, systems analysts, and students, convenient access to the techniques and tools of both library and information science. Impeccably researched, cross referenced, alphabetized by subject, and generously illustrated, the Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science integrates the essential theoretical and practical information accumulating in this rapidly growing field."

Man of Douglas, Man of Lincoln

Man of Douglas, Man of Lincoln

Author: Ian Michael Spurgeon

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 9780826266675

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 922

"Focusing on the last twelve years of James Henry Lane's life, Spurgeon delves into key aspects of his career such as his time as an Indiana congressman, his role in Kansas's constitutional conventions, and his evolving stance on slavery to challenge prevailing views on Lane's place in history"--Provided by publisher.

Bleeding Kansas

Bleeding Kansas

Author: Nicole Etcheson

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015058739593

Category: History

Page: 370

View: 246

Examines the social milieu of the settlers and traces the complex interactions among groups inside and outside the territory, creating a comprehensive political, social, and intellectual history of this period in the state's history.

Custer, the Seventh Cavalry, and the Little Big Horn

Custer, the Seventh Cavalry, and the Little Big Horn

Author: Mike O'Keefe

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806188140

Category: History

Page: 946

View: 807

Since the shocking news first broke in 1876 of the Seventh Cavalry’s disastrous defeat at the Little Big Horn, fascination with the battle—and with Lieutenant George Armstrong Custer—has never ceased. Widespread interest in the subject has spawned a vast outpouring of literature, which only increases with time. This two-volume bibliography of Custer literature is the first to be published in some twenty-five years and the most complete ever assembled. Drawing on years of research, Michael O’Keefe has compiled entries for roughly 3,000 books and 7,000 articles and pamphlets. Covering both nonfiction and fiction (but not juvenile literature), the bibliography focuses on events beginning with Custer’s tenure at West Point during the 1850s and ending with the massacre at Wounded Knee in 1890. Included within this span are Custer’s experiences in the Civil War and in Texas, the 1873 Yellowstone and 1874 Black Hills expeditions, the Great Sioux War of 1876–77, and the Seventh Cavalry’s pursuit of the Nez Perces in 1877. The literature on Custer, the Battle of the Little Big Horn, and the Seventh Cavalry touches the entire American saga of exploration, conflict, and settlement in the West, including virtually all Plains Indian tribes, the frontier army, railroading, mining, and trading. Hence this bibliography will be a valuable resource for a broad audience of historians, librarians, collectors, and Custer enthusiasts.

John Brown

John Brown

Author: William Edward Burghardt Du Bois

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195325744

Category: History

Page: 193

View: 132

This book presents the text of the 1909 biography of abolitionist John Brown, written by African-American intellectual and activist W. E. B. Du Bois. The book has been edited by David Roediger.

America in 1857

America in 1857

Author: Kenneth M. Stampp

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199729034

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 973

It was a year packed with unsettling events. The Panic of 1857 closed every bank in New York City, ruined thousands of businesses, and caused widespread unemployment among industrial workers. The Mormons in Utah Territory threatened rebellion when federal troops approached with a non-Mormon governor to replace Brigham Young. The Supreme Court outraged northern Republicans and abolitionists with the Dred Scott decision ("a breathtaking example of judicial activism"). And when a proslavery minority in Kansas Territory tried to foist a proslavery constitution on a large antislavery majority, President Buchanan reneged on a crucial commitment and supported the minority, a disastrous miscalculation which ultimately split the Democratic party in two. In America in 1857, eminent American historian Kenneth Stampp offers a sweeping narrative of this eventful year, covering all the major crises while providing readers with a vivid portrait of America at mid-century. Stampp gives us a fascinating account of the attempt by William Walker and his band of filibusters to conquer Nicaragua and make it a slave state, of crime and corruption, and of street riots by urban gangs such as New York's Dead Rabbits and Bowery Boys and Baltimore's Plug Uglies and Blood Tubs. But the focus continually returns to Kansas. He examines the outrageous political frauds perpetrated by proslavery Kansans, Buchanan's calamitous response and Stephen Douglas's break with the President (a rare event in American politics, a major party leader repudiating the president he helped elect), and the whirl of congressional votes and dramatic debates that led to a settlement humiliating to Buchanan--and devastating to the Democrats. 1857 marked a turning point, at which sectional conflict spun out of control and the country moved rapidly toward the final violent resolution in the Civil War. Stampp's intensely focused look at this pivotal year illuminates the forces at work and the mood of the nation as it plummeted toward disaster.

Civil War on the Western Border, 1854-1865

Civil War on the Western Border, 1854-1865

Author: Jay Monaghan

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803236050

Category: History

Page: 454

View: 532

The first phase of the Civil War was fought west of the Mississippi River at least six years before the attack on Fort Sumter. Starting with the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854, Jay Monaghan traces the development of the conflict between the pro-slavery elements from Missouri and the New England abolitionists who migrated to Kansas. "Bleeding Kansas" provided a preview of the greater national struggle to come. The author allows a new look at Quantrill's sacking of Lawrence, organized bushwhackery, and border battles that cost thousands of lives. Not the least valuable are chapters on the American Indians’ part in the conflict. The record becomes devastatingly clear: the fighting in the West was the cruelest and most useless of the whole affair, and if men of vision had been in Washington in the 1850s it might have been avoided.