Theatre and Archival Memory

Theatre and Archival Memory

Author: Barry Houlihan

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030745486

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 275

View: 435

This book presents new insights into the production and reception of Irish drama, its internationalisation and political influences, within a pivotal period of Irish cultural and social change. From the 1950s onwards, Irish theatre engaged audiences within new theatrical forms at venues from the Pike Theatre, the Project Arts Centre, and the Gate Theatre, as well as at Ireland’s national theatre, the Abbey. Drawing on newly released and digitised archival records, this book argues for an inclusive historiography reflective of the formative impacts upon modern Irish theatre as recorded within marginalised performance histories. This study examines these works' experimental dramaturgical impacts in terms of production, reception, and archival legacies. The book, framed by the device of ‘archival memory’, serves as a means for scholars and theatre-makers to inter-contextualise existing historiography and to challenge canon formation. It also presents a new social history of Irish theatre told from the fringes of history and reanimated through archival memory.

Music, Dance and the Archive

Music, Dance and the Archive

Author: Amanda Harris

Publisher: Sydney University Press

ISBN: 9781743328699

Category: Music

Page: 204

View: 607

Music, Dance and the Archive reimagines records of performance cultures from the archive through collaborative and creative research. In this edited volume, Amanda Harris, Linda Barwick and Jakelin Troy bring together performing artists, cultural leaders and interdisciplinary scholars to highlight the limits of archival records of music and dance. Through artistic methods drawn from Indigenous methodologies, dance studies and song practices, the contributors explore modes of re-embodying archival records, renewing song practices, countering colonial narratives and re-presenting performance traditions. The book’s nine chapters are written by song and dance practitioners, curators, music and dance historians, anthropologists, linguists and musicologists, who explore music and dance by Indigenous people from the West, far north and southeast of the Australian continent, and from Aotearoa New Zealand, Taiwan and Turtle Island (North America). Music, Dance and the Archive interrogates historical practices of access to archives by showing how Indigenous performing artists and community members and academic researchers (Indigenous and non-Indigenous) are collaborating to bring life to objects that have been stored in archives. It not only examines colonial archiving practices but also creative and provocative efforts to redefine the role of archives and to bring them into dialogue with contemporary creative work. Through varied contributions the book seeks to destabilise the very definition of “archives” and to imagine the different forms in which cultural knowledge can be held for current and future Indigenous stakeholders. Music, Dance and the Archive highlights the necessity of relationships, Country and creativity in practising song and dance, and in revitalising practices that have gone out of use.

Negotiating Copyright in the American Theatre: 1856–1951

Negotiating Copyright in the American Theatre: 1856–1951

Author: Brent S. Salter

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108620352

Category: Law

Page:

View: 530

Drawing on fascinating archival discoveries from the past two centuries, Brent Salter shows how copyright has been negotiated in the American theatre. Who controls the space between authors and audiences? Does copyright law actually protect playwrights and help them make a living? At the center of these negotiations are mediating businesses with extraordinary power that rapidly evolved from the mid-nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries: agents, publishers, producers, labor associations, administrators, accountants, lawyers, government bureaucrats, and film studio executives. As these mediators asserted authority over creativity, creators organized to respond, through collective minimum contracts, informal guild expectations, and professional norms, to protect their presumed rights as authors. This institutional, relational, legal, and business history of the entertainment history in America illuminates both the historical context and the present law. An innovative new kind of intellectual property history, the book maps the relations between the different players from the ground up.

A Cultural History of Theatre in Antiquity

A Cultural History of Theatre in Antiquity

Author: Martin Revermann

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350135307

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 204

Theatre was at the very heart of culture in Graeco-Roman civilizations and its influence permeated across social and class boundaries. The theatrical genres of tragedy, comedy, satyr play, mime and pantomime operate in Antiquity alongside the conception of theatre as both an entertainment for the masses and a vehicle for intellectual, political and artistic expression. Drawing together contributions from scholars in Classics and Theatre Studies, this volume uniquely examines the Greek and Roman cultural spheres in conjunction with one another rather than in isolation. Each chapter takes a different theme as its focus: institutional frameworks; social functions; sexuality and gender; the environment of theatre; circulation; interpretations; communities of production; repertoire and genres; technologies of performance; and knowledge transmission.

The Global and Local Appeal of Kneehigh Theatre Company

The Global and Local Appeal of Kneehigh Theatre Company

Author: Catherine Trenchfield

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781527586611

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 255

View: 864

This book explores Kneehigh Theatre Company’s notions of “Brand Kneehigh”, discussing how their theatrical style enjoyed local and global appeal, in relation to theories of globalisation, localisation and cultural exchange. It defines Kneehigh’s theatrical brand, indicating Cornish cultural identity as a core component in conjunction with international influences. By looking at the history of this company, the book’s analysis of key productions reflects on qualities attributed to “Brand Kneehigh” and considers the ‘local’ and ‘global’ nature of their work. The selection and review of productions examined here reveals the changes and reinventions Kneehigh have undergone to incorporate shifting interests and socioeconomic engagements. This book explores Kneehigh’s ambitions to establish themselves as a company delivering material that is ‘popular’ in appeal, meeting the needs of a Cornish (local) community and an international (global) audience. However, tensions working between local and global interests are also exposed, with an investigation into Kneehigh’s own cited solution: their self-created performance space, the Asylum.

Documentation, Disappearance and the Representation of Live Performance

Documentation, Disappearance and the Representation of Live Performance

Author: M. Reason

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230598560

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 269

View: 290

The documentation of practice is one of the principle concerns of performance studies. Focusing on contemporary performance practice and with emphasis on the transformative impact of video, photography and writing, this book explores the ideological, practical, and representational implications of knowing performance through its documentations.

Theatre Symposium, Vol. 25

Theatre Symposium, Vol. 25

Author: Karen Berman

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817370121

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 114

View: 942

Addresses the ways that theatre both shapes cross-cultural dialogue and is itself, in turn, shaped by those forces. Globalization may strike many as a phenomenon of our own historical moment, but it is truly as old as civilization: we need only look to the ancient Silk Road linking the Far East to the Mediterranean in order to find some of the earliest recorded impacts of people and goods crossing borders. Yet, in the current cultural moment, tensions are high due to increased migration, economic unpredictability, complicated acts of local and global terror, and heightened political divisions all over the world. Thus globalization seems new and a threat to our ways of life, to our nations, and to our cultures. In what ways have theatre practitioners, educators, and scholars worked to support cross-cultural dialogue historically? And in what ways might theatre embrace the complexities and contradictions inherent in any meaningful exchange? The essays in Theatre Symposium, Volume 25 reflect on these questions. Featured in Theatre Symposium, Volume 25 “Theatre as Cultural Exchange: Stages and Studios of Learning” by Anita Gonzalez “Certain Kinds of Dances Used among Them: An Initial Inquiry into Colonial Spanish Encounters with the Areytos of the Taíno in Puerto Rico” by E. Bert Wallace “Gertrude Hoffmann’s Lawful Piracy: ‘A Vision of Salome’ and the Russian Season as Transatlantic Production Impersonations” by Sunny Stalter-Pace “Greasing the Global: Princess Lotus Blossom and the Fabrication of the ‘Orient’ to Pitch Products in the American Medicine Show” by Chase Bringardner “Dismembering Tennessee Williams: The Global Context of Lee Breuer’s A Streetcar Named Desire” by Daniel Ciba “Transformative Cross-Cultural Dialogue in Prague: Americans Creating Czech History Plays” by Karen Berman “Finding Common Ground: Lessac Training across Cultures” by Erica Tobolski and Deborah A. Kinghorn

Artists in the Archive

Artists in the Archive

Author: Paul Clarke

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317398769

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 336

View: 763

Artists in the Archive explores the agency and materiality of the archival document through a stunning collection of critical writings and original artworks. It examines the politics and philosophy behind re-using remains, historicising this artistic practice and considering the breadth of ways in which archival materials inform, inflect and influence new works. Taking a fresh look at the relationships between insider know-how and outsider knowledge, Artists in the Archive opens a vital dialogue between a global range of artists and scholars. It seeks to trouble the distinction between artistic practice and scholarly research, offering disciplinary perspectives from experimental theatre, performance art, choreography and dance, to visual art making, archiving and curating.

Ireland, Memory and Performing the Historical Imagination

Ireland, Memory and Performing the Historical Imagination

Author: Mary P. Caulfield

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137362186

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 244

View: 718

This book explores the performance of Irish collective memories and forgotten histories. It proposes an alternative and more comprehensive criterion of Irish theatre practices. These practices can be defined as the 'rejected', contested and undervalued plays and performativities that are integral to Ireland's political and cultural landscapes.

The Memory Marketplace

The Memory Marketplace

Author: Emilie Pine

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253049513

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 262

View: 435

What happens when cultural memory becomes a commodity? Who owns the memory? In The Memory Marketplace, Emilie Pine explores how memory is performed both in Ireland and abroad by considering the significant body of contemporary Irish theatre that contends with its own culture and history. Analyzing examples from this realm of theatre, Pine focuses on the idea of witnesses, both as performers on stage and as members of the audience. Whose memories are observed in these transactions, and how and why do performances prioritize some memories over others? What does it mean to create, rehearse, perform, and purchase the theatricalization of memory? The Memory Marketplace shows this transaction to be particularly fraught in the theatricalization of traumatic moments of cultural upheaval, such as the child sexual abuse scandal in Ireland. In these performances, the role of empathy becomes key within the marketplace dynamic, and Pine argues that this empathy shapes the kinds of witnesses created. The complexities and nuances of this exchange—subject and witness, spectator and performer, consumer and commodified—provide a deeper understanding of the crucial role theatre plays in shaping public understanding of trauma, memory, and history.