The Stars of Galileo Galilei and the Universal Knowledge of Athanasius Kircher

The Stars of Galileo Galilei and the Universal Knowledge of Athanasius Kircher

Author: Roberto Buonanno

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9783319003009

Category: Science

Page: 178

View: 915

In this fascinating book, the author traces the careers, ideas, discoveries, and inventions of two renowned scientists, Athanasius Kircher and Galileo Galilei, one a Jesuit, the other a sincere man of faith whose relations with the Jesuits deteriorated badly. The Author documents Kircher’s often intuitive work in many areas, including translating the hieroglyphs, developing sundials, and inventing the magic lantern, and explains how Kircher was a forerunner of Darwin in suggesting that animal species evolve. Galileo’s work on scales, telescopes, and sun spots is mapped and discussed, and care is taken to place his discoveries within their cultural environment. While Galileo is without doubt the “winner” in the comparison with Kircher, the latter achieved extraordinary insights by unconventional means. For all Galileo’s fine work, the author believes that scientists do need to regain the power of dreaming, vindicating Kirchner’s view.

The Stars of Galileo Galilei and the Universal Knowledge of Athanasius Kircher

The Stars of Galileo Galilei and the Universal Knowledge of Athanasius Kircher

Author: Roberto Buonanno

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319375571

Category: Science

Page: 178

View: 295

In this fascinating book, the author traces the careers, ideas, discoveries, and inventions of two renowned scientists, Athanasius Kircher and Galileo Galilei, one a Jesuit, the other a sincere man of faith whose relations with the Jesuits deteriorated badly. The Author documents Kircher’s often intuitive work in many areas, including translating the hieroglyphs, developing sundials, and inventing the magic lantern, and explains how Kircher was a forerunner of Darwin in suggesting that animal species evolve. Galileo’s work on scales, telescopes, and sun spots is mapped and discussed, and care is taken to place his discoveries within their cultural environment. While Galileo is without doubt the “winner” in the comparison with Kircher, the latter achieved extraordinary insights by unconventional means. For all Galileo’s fine work, the author believes that scientists do need to regain the power of dreaming, vindicating Kirchner’s view.

Projecting Spirits

Projecting Spirits

Author: Pasi Väliaho

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9781503631946

Category: Social Science

Page: 332

View: 296

The history of projected images at the turn of the seventeenth century reveals a changing perception of chance and order, contingency and form. In Projecting Spirits, Pasi Väliaho maps how the leading optical media of the period—the camera obscura and the magic lantern—developed in response to, and framed, the era's key intellectual dilemma of whether the world fell under God's providential care, or was subject to chance and open to speculating. As Väliaho shows, camera obscuras and magic lanterns were variously employed to give the world an intelligible and manageable design. Jesuit scholars embraced devices of projection as part of their pursuit of divine government, whilst the Royal Society fellows enlisted them in their quest for empirical knowledge as well as colonial expansion. Projections of light and shadow grew into critical metaphors in early responses to the turbulences of finance. In such instances, Väliaho argues, "projection" became an indispensable cognitive form to both assert providence, and to make sense of an economic reality that was gradually escaping from divine guidance. Drawing on a range of materials—philosophical, scientific and religious literature, visual arts, correspondence, poems, pamphlets, and illustrations—this provocative and inventive work expands our concept of the early media of projection, revealing how they spoke to early modern thinkers, and shaped a new, speculative concept of the world.

Between Tradition and Innovation

Between Tradition and Innovation

Author: Ad J. Meskens

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004447905

Category: Education

Page: 307

View: 680

This book offers an analysis of the ground breaking mathematical work of Gregorio a San Vicente and his student and shows that the Flemish Jesuit Mathematics School had profound influence on mathematics in the seventeenth century.

Context-Enhanced Information Fusion

Context-Enhanced Information Fusion

Author: Lauro Snidaro

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319289717

Category: Computers

Page: 703

View: 118

This text reviews the fundamental theory and latest methods for including contextual information in fusion process design and implementation. Chapters are contributed by the foremost international experts, spanning numerous developments and applications. The book highlights high- and low-level information fusion problems, performance evaluation under highly demanding conditions, and design principles. A particular focus is placed on approaches that integrate research from different communities, emphasizing the benefit of combining different techniques to overcome the limitations of a single perspective. Features: introduces the terminology and core elements in information fusion and context; presents key themes for context-enhanced information fusion; discusses design issues in developing context-aware fusion systems; provides mathematical grounds for modeling the contextual influences in representative fusion problems; describes the fusion of hard and soft data; reviews a diverse range of applications.

The Enduring Fantastic

The Enduring Fantastic

Author: Anna Höglund

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476642789

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 485

Fantastic fiction is traditionally understood as Western genre literature such as fantasy, science fiction, and horror. Expanding on this understanding, these essays explore how the fantastic has been used in Western societies since the Middle Ages as a tool for organizing and materializing abstractions in order to make sense of the present social order. Disciplines represented here include literature studies, gender studies, biology, ethnology, archeology, history, religion, game studies, cultural sociology, and film studies. Individual essays cover topics such as the fantastic creatures of medieval chronicle, mummy medicine in eighteenth-century Sweden, how fears of disease filtered through the universal and adaptable vampire, the gender aspects of goddess worship in the secular West, ecocentrism in fantasy fiction, how videogames are dealing with the remediation of heritage, and more.

Architecture and the Language Debate

Architecture and the Language Debate

Author: Nicholas Temple

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317271192

Category: Architecture

Page: 260

View: 689

This book examines the creative exchanges between architects, artists and intellectuals, from the Early Renaissance to the beginning of the Enlightenment, in the forging of relationships between architecture and emerging concepts of language in early modern Italy. The study extends across the spectrum of linguistic disputes during this time – among members of the clergy, humanists, philosophers and polymaths – on issues of grammar, rhetoric, philology, etymology and epigraphy, and how these disputes paralleled and informed important developments in architectural thinking and practice. Drawing upon a wealth of primary source material, such as humanist tracts, philosophical works, architectural/antiquarian treatises, epigraphic/philological studies, religious sermons and grammaticae, the book traces key periods when the emerging field of linguistics in early modern Italy impacted on the theory, design and symbolism of buildings.