The Infamous Alcatraz Prison in United States History

The Infamous Alcatraz Prison in United States History

Author: Marilyn Tower Oliver

Publisher: Enslow Publishing, LLC

ISBN: 9780766063211

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 96

View: 942

An intriguing history of Alcatraz Island and its infamous prison, located off the coast of San Francisco, from the earliest years of Spanish exploration to the present day. Highlighting the unique geographical features of the island, it shows how Alcatraz went through many changes, being used over the years as a military facility, a notorious federal penitentiary widely believed to be escape-proof, as well as the site of American Indian uprisings.

The Infamous Alcatraz Prison in United States History

The Infamous Alcatraz Prison in United States History

Author: Marilyn Tower Oliver

Publisher: Enslow Publishing, LLC

ISBN: 9780766063204

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 96

View: 603

An intriguing history of Alcatraz Island and its infamous prison, located off the coast of San Francisco, from the earliest years of Spanish exploration to the present day. Highlighting the unique geographical features of the island, it shows how Alcatraz went through many changes, being used over the years as a military facility, a notorious federal penitentiary widely believed to be escape-proof, as well as the site of American Indian uprisings.

Alcatraz Prison in American History

Alcatraz Prison in American History

Author: Marilyn Tower Oliver

Publisher: Enslow Pub Incorporated

ISBN: IND:30000053143917

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 128

View: 900

Traces the development of the federal prison at Alcatraz Island from the days of Spanish exploration, through its years as a military prison, to its fame as the most escape-proof prison in America.

Alcatraz

Alcatraz

Author: Michael Esslinger

Publisher:

ISBN: 0970461461

Category: True Crime

Page: 608

View: 807

ALCATRAZ: the name alone said it all... It was meant to send a shudder down the spines of the nation's most incorrigible criminals. It stripped Al Capone of his power. It tamed "Machine Gun" Kelly into a model of decorum. It took the birds away from the Birdman of Alcatraz.This mammoth reference navigates the island's history through rarely seen documents, interviews and hundreds of pages of historic photographs. Author interviews range from men such as legendary FBI fugitive James Whitey Bulger; Dale Stamphill, a principle in the 1938 escape with Doc Barker and Henry Young; to Atom Spy Morton Sobell, the co-defendant of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. Michael Esslinger thoroughly details the prominent events, inmates, and life inside the most infamous prison in American History. His research included hundreds of hours examining actual Alcatraz inmate case files (including rare original documents from Al Capone, Machine Gun Kelly, and over a hundred others) exploring the prison grounds from the rooftop to the waterfront to help retrace events, escape routes, in addition to conducting various interviews with former inmates and guards. His study has resulted in detailed accounts of all the recorded escape attempts including the Battle of Alcatraz. A detailed account of the 1962 escape of Frank Morris and the Anglin Brothers provides rare insight extracted through photos, and over 1,700 pages of FBI and Bureau of Prisons investigative notes. Detailed narratives of Alcatraz's most notable inmates who include Robert Stroud (Birdman of Alcatraz), Al Capone, Machine Gun Kelly, Frank Morris, the Anglin Brothers, Doc Barker, Joe Cretzer, Bernard Coy, Miran Thompson, Sam Shockley, and many-many others. Alcatraz: A History of the Penitentiary Years, is a comprehensive reference on the history of Alcatraz and contains one of the most comprehensive archives of inmate and prison life photographs (over 1,000).

History of Criminal Justice

History of Criminal Justice

Author: Mark Jones

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781437734973

Category: History

Page: 406

View: 911

Covering criminal justice history on a cross-national basis, this book surveys criminal justice in Western civilization and American life chronologically from ancient times to the present. It is an introduction to the historical problems of crime, law enforcement and penology, set against the background of major historical events and movements. Integrating criminal justice history into the scope of European, British, French and American history, this text provides the opportunity for comparisons of crime and punishment over boundaries of national histories. The text concludes with a chapter that addresses terrorism and homeland security. * Spans all of western history, and examines the core beliefs about human nature and society that informed the development of criminal justice systems. The fifth edition gives increased coverage of American law enforcement, corrections, and legal systems * Each chapter is enhanced with supplemental "Timeline," "Time Capsule," and "Featured Outlaw" boxes as well as discussion questions, notes and problems * Contains discussion questions, notes, learning objectives, key terms lists, biographical vignettes of key historical figures, and "History Today" exercises to engage the reader and encourage critical thinking

Alcatraz

Alcatraz

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1532773331

Category:

Page: 90

View: 860

*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the prison written by officials and inmates *Describes the various parts of the prison, the Battle of Alcatraz, and escape attempts *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "It's mighty good to get up and leave. This Rock ain't good for nobody." - Frank Weatherman, the last prisoner to leave in 1963 Just a little over 2 kilometers offshore from the sparkling waters of the San Francisco Bay lies a humble strip of 22-acre land. Squawking pelicans, seagulls, and pigeons soar over the mysterious island, which is hugged by dense, salty fog. This island, of course, is Alcatraz. Alcatraz Island has been home to a lighthouse, a military fort, a national park, and gatherings of Native American protesters, but say the name Alcatraz to any American and they will immediately associate it with prison. With the likes of Al Capone, Robert "Birdman" Stroud, George "Machine Gun" Kelly, and James "Whitey" Bulger gracing the inmate roster, many quickly associated toughness with the prison. Not before long, legendary stories began surfacing from the island penitentiary, both true and fiction. The island was a federal prison for only three decades, but in that time, "The Rock" became notorious for being the most secure prison in the nation. In that time, 3 dozen prisoners tried to escape, which led to the "Battle of Alcatraz" and some of the most complex plots ever made to bust out, but nobody ever successfully escaped The Rock, and several died trying. As one commenter poignantly put it, "You break the rules, you go to prison. You break the prison rules, you go to Alcatraz Prison." Another writer echoed this sentiment, calling Alcatraz "the great garbage can of San Francisco Bay, into which every federal prison dumped its most rotten apples." In a sense, it was fitting that Alcatraz became the most famous prison in American history, because hundreds of years before the penitentiary was located there, it was being used by Native Americans to banish members. Thanks to the strong currents near it and the cold, inhospitable terrain of the small island, Native Americans only used it sparingly, and unruly members were often sent there as punishment. While local Native Americans referred to it as "Evil Island," the island got its most famous name from Spanish explorer Juan Manuel de Ayala, who mapped the Bay in 1775 and named the island "La Isla de los Alcatraces" ("The Island of the Pelicans"). Although pelicans no longer call the island home, a French explorer in the early 19th century confirmed that the island was "covered with a countless number of these birds. A gun fired over the feathered legions caused them to fly up in a great cloud and with a noise like a hurricane." Like the Native Americans, the Spanish barely used the island, but given its location, the island would eventually have military value. The federal government eventually established a fort on the island, and it was soon used to hold Confederate prisoners during the Civil War. During the war, one Union supporter gloated over the news that one Confederate sympathizer "will be transported to the healthful but breezy atmosphere of Alcatraz Island, where he can ruminate ad nauseum and chew the bitter end of treason." For all of these reasons, Alcatraz has a unique legacy and it remains a fixture of American pop culture. Indeed, it remains one of San Francisco's most popular tourist destinations. As a former captain of the guards, Philip Bergen, put it, "The public never wanted to know that real Alcatraz. Even today after the prison has been closed for so many decades, the public just won't let go of the myths." Alcatraz: The History of America's Most Notorious Island and Prison examines the colorful and controversial past of Alcatraz. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Rock like never before.

Historical Dictionary of the 1940s

Historical Dictionary of the 1940s

Author: James Gilbert Ryan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317468653

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 648

View: 146

The only available historical dictionary devoted exclusively to the 1940s, this book offers readers a ready-reference portrait of one of the twentieth century's most tumultuous decades. In nearly 600 concise entries, the volume quickly defines a historical figure, institution, or event, and then points readers to three sources that treat the subject in depth. In selecting topics for inclusion, the editors and authors offer a representative slice of life as contemporaneous Americans saw it - with coverage of people; movements; court cases; and economic, social, cultural, political, military, and technological changes. The book focuses chiefly on the United States, but places American lives and events firmly within a global context.

The Rock

The Rock

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 1505883962

Category:

Page: 62

View: 658

*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of Alcatraz by workers and inmates *Profiles the most famous inmates and escape attempts *Includes a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "You were a number, you weren't a name; I wasn't Jim Quillen. Hell, I was Number 586 and nobody wanted that." - Jim Quillen "It's mighty good to get up and leave. This Rock ain't good for nobody." - Frank Weatherman, the last prisoner to leave in 1963 Alcatraz Island has been home to a lighthouse, a military fort, a national park, and gatherings of Native American protesters, but say the name Alcatraz to any American and they will immediately associate it with prison. This is somewhat ironic since the island, just a mile and a half away from San Francisco in the Bay, was a federal prison for only three decades, but in that time, "The Rock" became notorious for being the most secure prison in the nation. In that time, 3 dozen prisoners tried to escape, which led to the "Battle of Alcatraz" and some of the most complex plots ever made to bust out, but nobody ever successfully escaped The Rock, and several died trying. As one commenter poignantly put it, "You break the rules, you go to prison. You break the prison rules, you go to Alcatraz Prison." Another writer echoed this sentiment, calling Alcatraz "the great garbage can of San Francisco Bay, into which every federal prison dumped its most rotten apples." In a sense, it was fitting that Alcatraz became the most famous prison in American history, because hundreds of years before the penitentiary was located there, it was being used by Native Americans to banish members. Thanks to the strong currents near it and the cold, inhospitable terrain of the small island, Native Americans only used it sparingly, and unruly members were often sent there as punishment. While local Native Americans referred to it as "Evil Island," the island got its most famous name from Spanish explorer Juan Manuel de Ayala, who mapped the Bay in 1775 and named the island "La Isla de los Alcatraces" ("The Island of the Pelicans"). Although pelicans no longer call the island home, a French explorer in the early 19th century confirmed that the island was "covered with a countless number of these birds. A gun fired over the feathered legions caused them to fly up in a great cloud and with a noise like a hurricane." Like the Native Americans, the Spanish barely used the island, but given its location, the island would eventually have military value. The federal government eventually established a fort on the island, and it was soon used to hold Confederate prisoners during the Civil War. During the war, one Union supporter gloated over the news that one Confederate sympathizer "will be transported to the healthful but breezy atmosphere of Alcatraz Island, where he can ruminate ad nauseum and chew the bitter end of treason." For all of these reasons, Alcatraz has a unique legacy and it remains a fixture of American pop culture. Indeed, it remains one of San Francisco's most popular tourist destinations. As a former captain of the guards, Philip Bergen, put it, "The public never wanted to know that real Alcatraz. Even today after the prison has been closed for so many decades, the public just won't let go of the myths." The Rock: The History of Alcatraz Island and America's Most Famous Prison chronicles the history of one of America's most notorious island. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Alcatraz like never before, in no time at all.

Understanding American Icons

Understanding American Icons

Author: Arthur Asa Berger

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315416199

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 184

View: 949

This brief, student-friendly introduction to the study of semiotics uses examples from 25 iconic locations in the United States. From Coney Island to Las Vegas, the World Trade Center to the Grand Canyon, Berger shows how semiotics offers a different lens in understanding locations taken for granted in American culture. He recasts Disneyland according to Freud, channels the Mall of America through Baudrilliard, and sees Mount Rushmore through the lens of Gramsci. A seasoned author of student texts, Berger offers an entertaining, non-threatening way to teach theory to undergraduates and that will fit ideally in classes on cultural studies, American studies, social theory, and tourism.