The History of Cartography, Volume 6

The History of Cartography, Volume 6

Author: Mark Monmonier

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226152127

Category: Science

Page: 1728

View: 828

For more than thirty years, the History of Cartography Project has charted the course for scholarship on cartography, bringing together research from a variety of disciplines on the creation, dissemination, and use of maps. Volume 6, Cartography in the Twentieth Century, continues this tradition with a groundbreaking survey of the century just ended and a new full-color, encyclopedic format. The twentieth century is a pivotal period in map history. The transition from paper to digital formats led to previously unimaginable dynamic and interactive maps. Geographic information systems radically altered cartographic institutions and reduced the skill required to create maps. Satellite positioning and mobile communications revolutionized wayfinding. Mapping evolved as an important tool for coping with complexity, organizing knowledge, and influencing public opinion in all parts of the globe and at all levels of society. Volume 6 covers these changes comprehensively, while thoroughly demonstrating the far-reaching effects of maps on science, technology, and society—and vice versa. The lavishly produced volume includes more than five hundred articles accompanied by more than a thousand images. Hundreds of expert contributors provide both original research, often based on their own participation in the developments they describe, and interpretations of larger trends in cartography. Designed for use by both scholars and the general public, this definitive volume is a reference work of first resort for all who study and love maps.

The History of Cartography, Volume 4

The History of Cartography, Volume 4

Author: Matthew H. Edney

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226339221

Category: Science

Page: 1920

View: 532

Since its launch in 1987, the History of Cartography series has garnered critical acclaim and sparked a new generation of interdisciplinary scholarship. Cartography in the European Enlightenment, the highly anticipated fourth volume, offers a comprehensive overview of the cartographic practices of Europeans, Russians, and the Ottomans, both at home and in overseas territories, from 1650 to 1800. The social and intellectual changes that swept Enlightenment Europe also transformed many of its mapmaking practices. A new emphasis on geometric principles gave rise to improved tools for measuring and mapping the world, even as large-scale cartographic projects became possible under the aegis of powerful states. Yet older mapping practices persisted: Enlightenment cartography encompassed a wide variety of processes for making, circulating, and using maps of different types. The volume’s more than four hundred encyclopedic articles explore the era’s mapping, covering topics both detailed—such as geodetic surveying, thematic mapping, and map collecting—and broad, such as women and cartography, cartography and the economy, and the art and design of maps. Copious bibliographical references and nearly one thousand full-color illustrations complement the detailed entries.

Mapping

Mapping

Author: Daniel Dorling

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317888352

Category: Science

Page: 192

View: 657

Illustrates how maps tell us as much about the people and the powers which create them, as about the places they show. Presents historical and contemporary evidence of how the human urge to describe, understand and control the world is presented through the medium of mapping, together with the individual and environmental constraints of the creator of the map.

The World of Maps

The World of Maps

Author: Judith A. Tyner

Publisher: Guilford Publications

ISBN: 9781462516483

Category: Social Science

Page: 270

View: 723

"Maps have power--they can instruct, make life easier, mislead, or even lie. This engaging text provides the tools to read, analyze, and use any kind of map and assess its strengths and weaknesses. Requiring no advanced math skills, the book presents basic concepts of symbolization, scale, coordinate systems, and projections. It gives students a deeper understanding of the types of maps they encounter every day, from turn-by-turn driving directions to the TV weather report. Readers also learn how to use multiple maps and imagery to analyze an area or region. The book includes 168 figures, among them 22 color plates; most of the figures can be downloaded as PowerPoint slides from the companion website. Appendices contain a glossary, recommended resources, a table of commonly used projections, and more"--

Women and Cartography in the Progressive Era

Women and Cartography in the Progressive Era

Author: Christina E. Dando

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134771141

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 513

In the twenty-first century we speak of a geospatial revolution, but over one hundred years ago another mapping revolution was in motion. Women’s lives were in motion: they were playing a greater role in public on a variety of fronts. As women became more mobile (physically, socially, politically), they used and created geographic knowledge and maps. The maps created by American women were in motion too: created, shared, distributed as they worked to transform their landscapes. Long overlooked, this women’s work represents maps and mapping that today we would term community or participatory mapping, critical cartography and public geography. These historic examples of women-generated mapping represent the adoption of cartography and geography as part of women’s work. While cartography and map use are not new, the adoption and application of this technology and form of communication in women’s work and in multiple examples in the context of their social work, is unprecedented. This study explores the implications of women’s use of this technology in creating and presenting information and knowledge and wielding it to their own ends. This pioneering and original book will be essential reading for those working in Geography, Gender Studies, Women’s Studies, Politics and History.

The Routledge Handbook of Mapping and Cartography

The Routledge Handbook of Mapping and Cartography

Author: Alexander J. Kent

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317568223

Category: Science

Page: 594

View: 197

This new Handbook unites cartographic theory and praxis with the principles of cartographic design and their application. It offers a critical appraisal of the current state of the art, science, and technology of map-making in a convenient and well-illustrated guide that will appeal to an international and multi-disciplinary audience. No single-volume work in the field is comparable in terms of its accessibility, currency, and scope. The Routledge Handbook of Mapping and Cartography draws on the wealth of new scholarship and practice in this emerging field, from the latest conceptual developments in mapping and advances in map-making technology to reflections on the role of maps in society. It brings together 43 engaging chapters on a diverse range of topics, including the history of cartography, map use and user issues, cartographic design, remote sensing, volunteered geographic information (VGI), and map art. The title’s expert contributions are drawn from an international base of influential academics and leading practitioners, with a view to informing theoretical development and best practice. This new volume will provide the reader with an exceptionally wide-ranging introduction to mapping and cartography and aim to inspire further engagement within this dynamic and exciting field. The Routledge Handbook of Mapping and Cartography offers a unique reference point that will be of great interest and practical use to all map-makers and students of geographic information science, geography, cultural studies, and a range of related disciplines.

Motion in Maps, Maps in Motion

Motion in Maps, Maps in Motion

Author: Bram Vannieuwenhuyze

Publisher: Amsterdam University Press

ISBN: 9789048542956

Category: History

Page: 186

View: 416

This volume argues that the mapping of stories, movement and change should not be understood as an innovation of contemporary cartography, but rather as an important aspect of human cartography with a longer history than might be assumed. The authors in this collection reflect upon the main characteristics and evolutions of story and motion mapping, from the figurative news and history maps that were mass-produced in early modern Europe, through the nineteenth- and twentieth-century flow maps that appeared in various atlases, up to the digital and interactive motion and personalised maps that are created today. Rather than presenting a clear and homogeneous history from the past up until the present, this book offers a toolbox for understanding and interpreting the complex interplays and links between narrative, motion and maps.

Imaging and Mapping Eastern Europe

Imaging and Mapping Eastern Europe

Author: Katarzyna Murawska-Muthesius

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351034401

Category: Art

Page: 252

View: 753

Imaging and Mapping Eastern Europe puts images centre stage and argues for the agency of the visual in the construction of Europe’s east as a socio-political and cultural entity. This book probes into the discontinuous processes of mapping the eastern European space and imaging the eastern European body. Beginning from the Renaissance maps of Sarmatia Europea, it moves onto the images of women in ethnic dress on the pages of travellers’ reports from the Balkans, to cartoons of children bullied by dictators in the satirical press, to Cold War cartography, and it ends with photos of protesting crowds on contemporary dust jackets. Studying the eastern European ‘iconosphere’ leads to the engagement with issues central for image studies and visual culture: word and image relationship, overlaps between the codes of othering and self-fashioning, as well as interaction between the diverse modes of production specific to cartography, travel illustrations, caricature, and book cover design. This book will be of interest to scholars in art history, visual culture, and central Asian, Russian and Eastern European studies.

International Encyclopedia of Human Geography

International Encyclopedia of Human Geography

Author:

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 9780081022962

Category: Social Science

Page: 7242

View: 647

International Encyclopedia of Human Geography, Second Edition embraces diversity by design and captures the ways in which humans share places and view differences based on gender, race, nationality, location and other factors—in other words, the things that make people and places different. Questions of, for example, politics, economics, race relations and migration are introduced and discussed through a geographical lens. This updated edition will assist readers in their research by providing factual information, historical perspectives, theoretical approaches, reviews of literature, and provocative topical discussions that will stimulate creative thinking. Presents the most up-to-date and comprehensive coverage on the topic of human geography Contains extensive scope and depth of coverage Emphasizes how geographers interact with, understand and contribute to problem-solving in the contemporary world Places an emphasis on how geography is relevant in a social and interdisciplinary context

Sovereignty without Power

Sovereignty without Power

Author: Leigh A. Gardner

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781009181105

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 363

View: 133

Reinterprets Liberia's economic history during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to investigate the challenges and opportunities of sovereignty during the age of empires.

Mapping Beyond Measure

Mapping Beyond Measure

Author: Simon Ferdinand

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9781496212115

Category: Social Science

Page: 315

View: 473

Over the last century a growing number of visual artists have been captivated by the entwinements of beauty and power, truth and artifice, and the fantasy and functionality they perceive in geographical mapmaking. This field of “map art” has moved into increasing prominence in recent years yet critical writing on the topic has been largely confined to general overviews of the field. In Mapping Beyond Measure Simon Ferdinand analyzes diverse map-based works of painting, collage, film, walking performance, and digital drawing made in Britain, Japan, the Netherlands, Ukraine, the United States, and the former Soviet Union, arguing that together they challenge the dominant modern view of the world as a measurable and malleable geometrical space. This challenge has strong political ramifications, for it is on the basis of modernity’s geometrical worldview that states have legislated over social space; that capital has coordinated global markets and exploited distant environments; and that powerful cartographic institutions have claimed exclusive authority in mapmaking. Mapping Beyond Measure breaks fresh ground in undertaking a series of close readings of significant map artworks in sustained dialogue with spatial theorists, including Peter Sloterdijk, Zygmunt Bauman, and Michel de Certeau. In so doing Ferdinand reveals how map art calls into question some of the central myths and narratives of rupture through which modern space has traditionally been imagined and establishes map art’s distinct value amid broader contemporary shifts toward digital mapping.

The Geography of Names

The Geography of Names

Author: Gwilym Lucas Eades

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317504597

Category: Science

Page: 164

View: 884

This book examines geographical names, place-names, and toponymy from philosophical and cultural evolutionary perspectives. Geographical name-tracking-networks (Geo-NTNs) are posited as tools for tracking names through time and across space, and for making sense of how names evolve both temporally and spatially. Examples from North and South American indigenous groups, the Canadian arctic, Wales, England, and the Middle East are brought into a theoretical framework for making sense of aspects of place-naming practices, beliefs, and systems. New geographical tools such as geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS) are demonstrated to be important in the production and maintenance of robust networks for keeping names and their associated meanings viable in a rapidly changing world where place-naming is being taken up increasingly in social media and other new mapping platforms. The Geography of Names makes the case that geographical names are transmitted memetically (i.e. as cultural units, or memes) through what Saul Kripke called communication chains. Combining insights from Kripke with views of later Wittgenstein on language and names as being inherently spatial, the present work advances theories of both these thinkers into an explicitly geographical inquiry that advances philosophical and practical aspects of naming, language, and mapping.