Jewish Autonomy in a Slave Society

Jewish Autonomy in a Slave Society

Author: Aviva Ben-Ur

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812252118

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 640

A fascinating portrait of Jewish life in Suriname from the 17th to 19th centuries Jewish Autonomy in a Slave Society explores the political and social history of the Jews of Suriname, a Dutch colony on the South American mainland just north of Brazil. Suriname was home to the most privileged Jewish community in the Americas where Jews, most of Iberian origin, enjoyed religious liberty, were judged by their own tribunal, could enter any trade, owned plantations and slaves, and even had a say in colonial governance. Aviva Ben-Ur sets the story of Suriname's Jews in the larger context of Atlantic slavery and colonialism and argues that, like other frontier settlements, they achieved and maintained their autonomy through continual negotiation with the colonial government. Drawing on sources in Dutch, English, French, Hebrew, Portuguese, and Spanish, Ben-Ur shows how, from their first permanent settlement in the 1660s to the abolition of their communal autonomy in 1825, Suriname Jews enjoyed virtually the same standing as the ruling white Protestants, with whom they interacted regularly. She also examines the nature of Jewish interactions with enslaved and free people of African descent in the colony. Jews admitted both groups into their community, and Ben-Ur illuminates the ways in which these converts and their descendants experienced Jewishness and autonomy. Lastly, she compares the Jewish settlement with other frontier communities in Suriname, most notably those of Indians and Maroons, to measure the success of their negotiations with the government for communal autonomy. The Jewish experience in Suriname was marked by unparalleled autonomy that nevertheless developed in one of the largest slave colonies in the New World.

The Jewish World In Modern Times

The Jewish World In Modern Times

Author: Abraham J Edelheit

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000302776

Category: Social Science

Page: 570

View: 686

The momentous events of modern Jewish history have led to a proliferation of books and articles on Jewish life over the last 350 years. Placing modern Jewish history into both universal and local contexts, this selected, annotated bibliography organizes and categorizes the best of this vast array of written material. The authors have included all English-language books of major importance on world Jewry and on individual Jewish communities, plus books most readily available to researchers and readers, and a select number of pamphlets and articles. The resulting bibliography is also a guide to recent Jewish historiography and research methods.

Jewish Emancipation

Jewish Emancipation

Author: David Sorkin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691205250

Category: History

Page: 526

View: 797

The first comprehensive history of how Jews became citizens in the modern world For all their unquestionable importance, the Holocaust and the founding of the State of Israel now loom so large in modern Jewish history that we have mostly lost sight of the fact that they are only part of—and indeed reactions to—the central event of that history: emancipation. In this book, David Sorkin seeks to reorient Jewish history by offering the first comprehensive account in any language of the process by which Jews became citizens with civil and political rights in the modern world. Ranging from the mid-sixteenth century to the beginning of the twenty-first, Jewish Emancipation tells the ongoing story of how Jews have gained, kept, lost, and recovered rights in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, the United States, and Israel. Emancipation, Sorkin shows, was not a one-time or linear event that began with the Enlightenment or French Revolution and culminated with Jews' acquisition of rights in Central Europe in 1867–71 or Russia in 1917. Rather, emancipation was and is a complex, multidirectional, and ambiguous process characterized by deflections and reversals, defeats and successes, triumphs and tragedies. For example, American Jews mobilized twice for emancipation: in the nineteenth century for political rights, and in the twentieth for lost civil rights. Similarly, Israel itself has struggled from the start to institute equality among its heterogeneous citizens. By telling the story of this foundational but neglected event, Jewish Emancipation reveals the lost contours of Jewish history over the past half millennium.

Antisemitism

Antisemitism

Author: Richard S. Levy

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781851094394

Category: History

Page: 828

View: 369

Written by top scholars in an accessible manner, this unique encyclopedia offers worldwide coverage of the origins, forms, practitioners, and effects of antisemitism, leading to the Holocaust and surviving to the present day. * 650 A-Z entries by over 200 scholars from 21 countries * Illustrations such as caricatures, political cartoons, maps, and pictures of famous antisemites and historical episodes * Citations of recent literature that follow each entry * Detailed index listing people, places, concepts, and events that enables users to find information about subjects not treated in dedicated articles * Direction at the end of each entry to other articles with special relevance to the topic

Simon Dubnow's "New Judaism"

Simon Dubnow's

Author: Robert Seltzer

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004260672

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 994

In Simon Dubnow’s ‘New Judaism’, Seltzer traces a shtetl youth’s rejection of traditional Judaism and the impact of European intellectual currents on the most eminent East European Jewish historian of his time (1860-1941) and exponent of Jewish cultural nationalism.

Paths of Emancipation

Paths of Emancipation

Author: Pierre Birnbaum

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400863976

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 238

Throughout the nineteenth century, legal barriers to Jewish citizenship were lifted in Europe, enabling organized Jewish communities and individuals to alter radically their relationships with the institutions of the Christian West. In this volume, one of the first to offer a comparative overview of the entry of Jews into state and society, eight leading historians analyze the course of emancipation in Holland, Germany, France, England, the United States, and Italy as well as in Turkey and Russia. The goal is to produce a systematic study of the highly diverse paths to emancipation and to explore their different impacts on Jewish identity, dispositions, and patterns of collective action. Jewish emancipation concerned itself primarily with issues of state and citizenship. Would the liberal and republican values of the Enlightenment guide governments in establishing the terms of Jewish citizenship? How would states react to Jews seeking to become citizens and to remain meaningfully Jewish? The authors examine these issues through discussions of the entry of Jews into the military, the judicial system, business, and academic and professional careers, for example, and through discussions of their assertive political activity. In addition to the editors, the contributors are Geoffrey Alderman, Hans Daalder, Werner E. Mosse, Aron Rodrigue, Dan V. Segre, and Michael Stanislawski. Originally published in 1995. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

A Debate on Jewish Emancipation and Christian Theology in Old Berlin

A Debate on Jewish Emancipation and Christian Theology in Old Berlin

Author: David Friedländer

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 9781603840699

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 794

When wealthy Jewish industrialist David Friedländer proposed in 1799 that Berlin's Jews undergo a sham conversion to Christianity in return for full German citizenship, he touched off a political and theological debate that would continue to define the relation between Jewish and German identity for more than a century. In the series of provocative letters collected here, Friedländer, Protestant leader Wilhelm Abraham Teller, and young Christian theologian Friedrich Schleiermacher debate Friedländer's radical proposal. In so doing, they grapple with many of the thorny problems--such as citizenship, religious tolerance, and assimilation--that continue to vex world political leaders today. Richard Crouter's Introduction provides the cultural, religious, and historical context for this compelling exchange; a postscript by Julie Klassen reveals the ways in which Germany's minorities continue to be marginalized more than two hundred years after Friedländer made his passionate appeal for political liberty and human rights.