The Court of Sapience

The Court of Sapience

Author: Elizabeth Ruth Harvey

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781487589851

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 152

The medieval English allegorical poem, The Court of Sapience, was written in the middle of the fifteenth century by an unknown author. It is best described as an encyclopaedia: in the allegory the poet describes the nature and activities of wisdom in all its aspects. He includes a moving account of the fall of a man and his restoration by divine wisdom; then he leads his dreamer through a landscape where all the traditional beauties of nature are catalogued and assigned their properties. The visit to the castle of Sapience, inhabited by all the branches of learning and the seven restorative virtues, completes the poem as we have it. The first edition was an early production of Caxton's press, and it was reprinted by his successor, Wynkyn de Worde. This is a new edition of Caxton's text of the poem. Variant readings from the extant manuscripts have investigated in detail and are discussed in the lengthy introduction and extensive commentary. The poem is an attractive work in itself, and has been admired by C.S. Lewis and other modern critics. It is also a valuable witness to the taste of the early Tudor period.

The Long Fifteenth Century

The Long Fifteenth Century

Author: Fellow and Tutor in English Helen Cooper

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198183658

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 392

View: 240

This book is a collection of essays written in honor of Professor Douglas Gray, editor of the groundbreaking Oxford Book of Late Medieval Verse and Prose. The essays provide a comprehensive survey of fifteenth-century literature, stressing its importance, interest, and richness.

The Early Tudor Court and International Musical Relations

The Early Tudor Court and International Musical Relations

Author: Theodor Dumitrescu

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351544962

Category: Music

Page: 348

View: 711

Since the days in the early twentieth century when the study of pre-Reformation English music first became a serious endeavour, a conceptual gap has separated the scholarship on English and continental music of the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. The teaching which has informed generations of students in influential textbooks and articles characterizes the musical life of England at this period through a language of separation and conservatism, asserting that English musicians were largely unaware of, and unaffected by, foreign practices after the mid-fifteenth century. The available historical evidence, nevertheless, contradicts a facile isolationist exposition of musical practice in early Tudor England. The increasing appearance of typically continental stylistic traits in mid-sixteenth-century English music represents not an arbitrary and unexpected shift of compositional approach, but rather a development prefaced by decades of documentable historical interactions. Theodor Dumitrescu treats the matter of musical relations between England and continental Europe during the first decades of the Tudor reign (c.1485-1530), by exploring a variety of historical, social, biographical, repertorial and intellectual links. In the first major study devoted to this topic, a wealth of documentary references scattered in primary and secondary sources receives a long-awaited collation and investigation, revealing the central role of the first Tudor monarchs in internationalizing the royal musical establishment and setting an example of considerable import for more widespread English artistic developments. By bringing together the evidence concerning Anglo-continental musical relations for the first time, along with new documents and interpretations concerning musicians, music manuscripts and theory sources, the investigation paves the way for a new evaluation of English musical styles in the first half of the sixteenth century.

The Oxford Handbook of Tudor Literature

The Oxford Handbook of Tudor Literature

Author: Mike Pincombe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199205882

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 861

View: 593

The literature of the entire Tudor period, from the reign of Henry VII to death of Elizabeth I is covered by this volume. It pays particular attention to the years before 1580, covering the establishment of print culture and growth of a reading public.

Pre-Modern Encyclopaedic Texts

Pre-Modern Encyclopaedic Texts

Author: Peter Binkley

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004247338

Category: History

Page: 454

View: 864

This proceedings volume contains contributions from many areas of literature, history and philosophy and comprises five extended essays on the problems and opportunities facing researchers into encyclopaedic texts, and 21 research papers on specific topics.

The Columbia History of British Poetry

The Columbia History of British Poetry

Author: Carl R. Woodring

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0585041555

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 764

View: 651

The Columbia Anthology of British Poetry brings together the most remarkable verse written in the British Isles over the course of the past twelve centuries, offering the greatest diversity of poetic voices in any anthology of its kind. From Shakespeare's memorable sonnets to Keats's haunting odes to T.S. Eliot's mediations on the conditions of modern life, the collection contains many of the best-loved treasures of British poetry. Longer and much-celebrated poems that rarely find their way into anthologies-including Pope's "Rape of the Lock" and Coleridge's "Rime of the Ancient Mariner"-claim a place in this collection. Queen Elizabeth I, Anne Killigrew, Aphra Behn, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Felicia Hemans are among dozens of women writers renowned in their own day and now restored to their rightful prominence. Scottish, Welsh, and Irish poets often excluded from anthologies of British poetry are here as well, including such extraordinary voices as Lady Grisell Baillie, Robert Burns, Hugh MacDiarmid, and Seamus Heaney. The finest contemporary poets are fully represented also, from Thom Gunn to Eavan Boland. The result is an amazingly rich and wide-ranging conversation among British poets that transcends the boundaries of time and place. Carl Woodring and James Shapiro, the team scholars who edited The Columbia History of British Poetry, have written incisive introductions to the careers of the poets, making this the most accessible and comprehensive anthology of British verse in print. Covering the new and the ancient, the classic and the rediscovered, this generous volume reimagines the horizons of British poetry.