The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Great Plains

The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Great Plains

Author: Loretta Fowler

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231507370

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 941

Plains Indians have long occupied a special place in the American imagination. Both the historical reality of such evocative figures and events as Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Sacajewea, and the Battle of Little Bighorn and the lived reality of Native Americans today are often confused and conflated with popular representations of Indians in movies, paintings, novels, and on television. Ingrained stereotypes and cultural misconceptions born of late nineteenth– and early twentieth–century images of the romantic nomad and the marauding savage have been surprisingly tenacious, obscuring the extraordinary cultural and linguistic diversity of the dozens of tribes and nations who have peopled the Great Plains. Here in one volume is an indispensable guide to the extensive ethnohistorical research that, in recent decades, has recovered the varied and often unexpected history of Comanche, Cheyenne, Osage, and Sioux Indians, to name only a few of the tribal groups included. From the earliest archaeological evidence to the current experience of Indians living on and off reservations, a wealth of information is presented in a clear and accessible way. The history of the Plains Indians has been a dynamic one of continuous change and adaptation as groups split and recombined to form new social orders and cultural traditions. Contact with Europeans and the introduction of trade in horses, slaves, furs, and guns dramatically altered native societies internally and influenced relations between different groups. In the face of pressures resulting from America's westward expansion throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries—the extinction of the bison, the imposition of reservation life, and the assimilationist policies of the U.S. federal government—the native peoples of the Great Plains have struggled to preserve their distinct cultures and reorient themselves to a new world on their own terms. The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Great Plains is divided into four parts. Part I presents an overview of the cultures and histories of Plains Indian people and surveys the key scholarly questions and debates that shape this field. Part II serves as an encyclopedia, alphabetically listing important individuals and places of significant cultural or historic meaning. Part III is a chronology of the major events in the history of American Indians in the Plains. The expertly selected resources guide in Part IV includes annotated bibliographies, museum and tribal Internet sites, and films that can be easily accessed by those wishing to learn more. The third in a six-volume reference series, The Columbia Guides to American Indian History and Culture, The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Great Plains is an invaluable resource for students, teachers, and researchers.

The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southwest

The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southwest

Author: Trudy Griffin-Pierce

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231520102

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 190

A major work on the history and culture of Southwest Indians, The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southwest tells a remarkable story of cultural continuity in the face of migration, displacement, violence, and loss. The Native peoples of the American Southwest are a unique group, for while the arrival of Europeans forced many Native Americans to leave their land behind, those who lived in the Southwest held their ground. Many still reside in their ancestral homes, and their oral histories, social practices, and material artifacts provide revelatory insight into the history of the region and the country as a whole. Trudy Griffin-Pierce incorporates her lifelong passion for the people of the Southwest, especially the Navajo, into an absorbing narrative of pre- and postcontact Native experiences. She finds that, even though the policies of the U.S. government were meant to promote assimilation, Native peoples formed their own response to outside pressures, choosing to adapt rather than submit to external change. Griffin-Pierce provides a chronology of instances that have shaped present-day conditions in the region, as well as an extensive glossary of significant people, places, and events. Setting a precedent for ethical scholarship, she describes different methods for researching the Southwest and cites sources for further archaeological and comparative study. Completing the volume is a selection of key primary documents, literary works, films, Internet resources, and contact information for each Native community, enabling a more thorough investigation into specific tribes and nations. The Columbia Guides to American Indian History and Culture also include: The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Great Plains Loretta Fowler The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Northeast Kathleen J. Bragdon The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast Theda Perdue and Michael D. Green

In View of the Mountains

In View of the Mountains

Author: Jennifer Patten

Publisher: Jennifer Patten

ISBN: 9781458123978

Category: Fort Morgan (Colo.)

Page: 370

View: 232

Fort Morgan is a town named for a short-lived military fort (1864-1868), but Fort Morgan's history isn't just military; it is linked with the movement west, with the telegraph and railroads - and with gold. The history of Fort Morgan may never rival that of Denver or glisten with the same gold dust of the mountain mining towns, but this town on the plains was central to the story of the Romantic west; connected to the major events of the age. Everyone has a history and every place is central to a story. What follows is the story from the land - of the land - on which Fort Morgan would rise.

Native American Culture

Native American Culture

Author: Kathleen Kuiper Manager, Arts and Culture

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc

ISBN: 9781615301386

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 256

View: 323

Even as contact with European cultures eroded indigenous lifestyles across North America, many Native American groups found ways to preserve the integrity of their communities through the arts, customs, languages, and religious traditions that animate Native American life. The ancient cultural legacies that both distinguish and unite these diverse tribes are the subject of this volume. --from publisher description

American Indians of the Plateau and Plains

American Indians of the Plateau and Plains

Author: Britannica Educational Publishing

Publisher: Britannica Educational Publishing

ISBN: 9781615307159

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 160

View: 724

The use of horses has perhaps most dramatically shaped the way of life for Native American tribes in the Plateau and Plains regions of North America, but the practices and traditions of both culture areas date back to a time long before Europeans ever touched American shores, introducing their animals and customs to the continent’s indigenous peoples. This captivating volume examines the history and cross-cultural interactions that came to be associated with the peoples of the Plateau and the changing settlement patterns of the Plains peoples, as well as the cultural, social, and spiritual practices that have defined the major tribes of each region.

The Columbia Guide to American Indian Literatures of the United States Since 1945

The Columbia Guide to American Indian Literatures of the United States Since 1945

Author: Eric Cheyfitz

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231511025

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 448

View: 239

The Columbia Guide to American Indian Literatures of the United States Since 1945 is the first major volume of its kind to focus on Native literatures in a postcolonial context. Written by a team of noted Native and non-Native scholars, these essays consider the complex social and political influences that have shaped American Indian literatures in the second half of the twentieth century, with particular emphasis on core themes of identity, sovereignty, and land. In his essay comprising part I of the volume, Eric Cheyfitz argues persuasively for the necessary conjunction of Indian literatures and federal Indian law from Apess to Alexie. Part II is a comprehensive survey of five genres of literature: fiction (Arnold Krupat and Michael Elliott), poetry (Kimberly Blaeser), drama (Shari Huhndorf), nonfiction (David Murray), and autobiography (Kendall Johnson), and discusses the work of Vine Deloria Jr., N. Scott Momaday, Joy Harjo, Simon Ortiz, Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, Gerald Vizenor, Jimmy Santiago Baca, and Sherman Alexie, among many others. Drawing on historical and theoretical frameworks, the contributors examine how American Indian writers and critics have responded to major developments in American Indian life and how recent trends in Native writing build upon and integrate traditional modes of storytelling. Sure to be considered a groundbreaking contribution to the field, The Columbia Guide to American Indian Literatures of the United States Since 1945 offers both a rich critique of history and a wealth of new information and insight.

Atlas of the Great Plains

Atlas of the Great Plains

Author: Stephen J. Lavin

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803215368

Category: History

Page: 335

View: 874

Explores the history of the Great Plains through more than three hundred full-color maps and extensive explanatory text.

A Companion to the Anthropology of American Indians

A Companion to the Anthropology of American Indians

Author: Thomas Biolsi

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781405182881

Category: Social Science

Page: 592

View: 677

This Companion is comprised of 27 original contributions by leading scholars in the field and summarizes the state of anthropological knowledge of Indian peoples, as well as the history that got us to this point. Surveys the full range of American Indian anthropology: from ecological and political-economic questions to topics concerning religion, language, and expressive culture Each chapter provides definitive coverage of its topic, as well as situating ethnographic and ethnohistorical data into larger frameworks Explores anthropology’s contribution to knowledge, its historic and ongoing complicities with colonialism, and its political and ethical obligations toward the people 'studied'

American Indians and the Fight for Equal Voting Rights

American Indians and the Fight for Equal Voting Rights

Author: Laughlin McDonald

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806186009

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 226

The struggle for voting rights was not limited to African Americans in the South. American Indians also faced discrimination at the polls and still do today. This book explores their fight for equal voting rights and carefully documents how non-Indian officials have tried to maintain dominance over Native peoples despite the rights they are guaranteed as American citizens. Laughlin McDonald has participated in numerous lawsuits brought on behalf of Native Americans in Montana, Colorado, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming. This litigation challenged discriminatory election practices such as at-large elections, redistricting plans crafted to dilute voting strength, unfounded allegations of election fraud on reservations, burdensome identification and registration requirements, lack of language assistance, and noncompliance with the Voting Rights Act. McDonald devotes special attention to the VRA and its amendments, whose protections are central to realizing the goal of equal political participation. McDonald describes past and present-day discrimination against Indians, including land seizures, destruction of bison herds, attempts to eradicate Native language and culture, and efforts to remove and in some cases even exterminate tribes. Because of such treatment, he argues, Indians suffer a severely depressed socioeconomic status, voting is sharply polarized along racial lines, and tribes are isolated and lack meaningful interaction with non-Indians in communities bordering reservations. Far more than a record of litigation, American Indians and the Fight for Equal Voting Rights paints a broad picture of Indian political participation by incorporating expert reports, legislative histories, newspaper accounts, government archives, and hundreds of interviews with tribal members. This in-depth study of Indian voting rights recounts the extraordinary progress American Indians have made and looks toward a more just future.

Encyclopedia of American Indian Issues Today [2 volumes]

Encyclopedia of American Indian Issues Today [2 volumes]

Author: Russell M. Lawson

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9780313381454

Category: Social Science

Page: 868

View: 436

This essential reference examines the history, culture, and modern tribal concerns of American Indians in North America. • Sidebars with additional information, resources, and primary source excerpts • Contributions from top scholars in the field • Bibliographies at the end of each essay for additional research