The Clement Bible at the Medieval Courts of Naples and Avignon

The Clement Bible at the Medieval Courts of Naples and Avignon

Author: CathleenA. Fleck

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351545525

Category: Art

Page: 370

View: 131

As a 'biography' of the fourteenth-century illustrated Bible of Clement VII, an opposition pope in Avignon from 1378-94, this social history traces the Bible's production in Naples (c. 1330) through its changing ownership and meaning in Avignon (c. 1340-1405) to its presentation as a gift to Alfonso, King of Aragon (c. 1424). The author's novel approach, based on solid art historical and anthropological methodologies, allows her to assess the object's evolving significance and the use of such a Bible to enhance the power and prestige of its princely and papal owners. Through archival sources, the author pinpoints the physical location and privileged treatment of the Clement Bible over a century. The author considers how the Bible's contexts in the collection of a bishop, several popes, and a king demonstrate the value of the Bible as an exchange commodity. The Bible was undoubtedly valued for the aesthetic quality of its 200+ luxurious images. Additionally, the author argues that its iconography, especially Jerusalem and visionary scenes, augments its worth as a reflection of contemporary political and religious issues. Its images offered biblical precedents, its style represented associations with certain artists and regions in Italy, and its past provided links to important collections. Fleck's examination of the art production around the Bible in Naples and Avignon further illuminates the manuscript's role as a reflection of the court cultures in those cities. Adding to recent art historical scholarship focusing on the taste and signature styles in late medieval and Renaissance courts, this study provides new information about workshop practices and techniques. In these two court cities, the author analyzes styles associated with different artists, different patrons, and even with different rooms of the rulers' palaces, offering new findings relevant to current scholarship, not only in art history but also in court and collection studies.

The Clement Bible at the Medieval Courts of Naples and Avignon

The Clement Bible at the Medieval Courts of Naples and Avignon

Author: Cathleen A. Fleck

Publisher:

ISBN: 1351545515

Category: Art

Page: 350

View: 547

"As a 'biography' of the fourteenth-century illustrated Bible of Clement VII, an opposition pope in Avignon from 1378-94, this social history traces the Bible's production in Naples (c. 1330) through its changing ownership and meaning in Avignon (c. 1340-1405) to its presentation as a gift to Alfonso, King of Aragon (c. 1424). The author's novel approach, based on solid art historical and anthropological methodologies, allows her to assess the object's evolving significance and the use of such a Bible to enhance the power and prestige of its princely and papal owners. Through archival sources, the author pinpoints the physical location and privileged treatment of the Clement Bible over a century. The author considers how the Bible's contexts in the collection of a bishop, several popes, and a king demonstrate the value of the Bible as an exchange commodity. The Bible was undoubtedly valued for the aesthetic quality of its 200+ luxurious images. Additionally, the author argues that its iconography, especially Jerusalem and visionary scenes, augments its worth as a reflection of contemporary political and religious issues. Its images offered biblical precedents, its style represented associations with certain artists and regions in Italy, and its past provided links to important collections. Fleck's examination of the art production around the Bible in Naples and Avignon further illuminates the manuscript's role as a reflection of the court cultures in those cities. Adding to recent art historical scholarship focusing on the taste and signature styles in late medieval and Renaissance courts, this study provides new information about workshop practices and techniques. In these two court cities, the author analyzes styles associated with different artists, different patrons, and even with different rooms of the rulers' palaces, offering new findings relevant to current scholarship, not only in art history but also in court and collection studies."--Provided by publisher.

The Clement Bible at the Medieval Courts of Naples and Avignon

The Clement Bible at the Medieval Courts of Naples and Avignon

Author: CathleenA. Fleck

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351545532

Category: Art

Page: 370

View: 615

As a 'biography' of the fourteenth-century illustrated Bible of Clement VII, an opposition pope in Avignon from 1378-94, this social history traces the Bible's production in Naples (c. 1330) through its changing ownership and meaning in Avignon (c. 1340-1405) to its presentation as a gift to Alfonso, King of Aragon (c. 1424). The author's novel approach, based on solid art historical and anthropological methodologies, allows her to assess the object's evolving significance and the use of such a Bible to enhance the power and prestige of its princely and papal owners. Through archival sources, the author pinpoints the physical location and privileged treatment of the Clement Bible over a century. The author considers how the Bible's contexts in the collection of a bishop, several popes, and a king demonstrate the value of the Bible as an exchange commodity. The Bible was undoubtedly valued for the aesthetic quality of its 200+ luxurious images. Additionally, the author argues that its iconography, especially Jerusalem and visionary scenes, augments its worth as a reflection of contemporary political and religious issues. Its images offered biblical precedents, its style represented associations with certain artists and regions in Italy, and its past provided links to important collections. Fleck's examination of the art production around the Bible in Naples and Avignon further illuminates the manuscript's role as a reflection of the court cultures in those cities. Adding to recent art historical scholarship focusing on the taste and signature styles in late medieval and Renaissance courts, this study provides new information about workshop practices and techniques. In these two court cities, the author analyzes styles associated with different artists, different patrons, and even with different rooms of the rulers' palaces, offering new findings relevant to current scholarship, not only in art history but also in court and collection studies.

A Companion to the Great Western Schism (1378-1417)

A Companion to the Great Western Schism (1378-1417)

Author: Joëlle Rollo-Koster

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004162778

Category: Religion

Page: 467

View: 499

The division of the Church or Schism that took place between 1378 and 1417 had no precedent in Christianity. No conclave since the twelfth century had acted as had those in April and September 1378, electing two concurrent popes. This crisis was neither an issue of the authority claimed by the pope and the Holy Roman Emperor nor an issue of authority and liturgy. The Great Western Schism was unique because it forced upon Christianity a rethinking of the traditional medieval mental frame. It raised question of personality, authority, human fallibility, ecclesiastical jurisdiction and taxation, and in the end responsibility in holding power and authority. This collection presents the broadest range of experiences, center and periphery, clerical and lay, male and female, Christian and Muslim. Theology, including exegesis of Scripture, diplomacy, French literature, reform, art, and finance all receive attention.

From She-Wolf to Martyr

From She-Wolf to Martyr

Author: Elizabeth Casteen

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501701009

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 312

View: 537

In From She-Wolf to Martyr, Elizabeth Casteen examines Johanna I of Naples's evolving, problematic reputation and uses it as a lens through which to analyze often-contradictory late-medieval conceptions of rulership, authority, and femininity.

Writing Southern Italy Before the Renaissance

Writing Southern Italy Before the Renaissance

Author: Ronald G. Musto

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351767392

Category: History

Page: 302

View: 379

This volume traces the work of trecento historians of the Mezzogiorno, analyzing it through current methodological and theoretical frameworks. Questioning the current consensus, the book examines how the South as a cultural "other" began evolving over the fourteenth century, and reconsiders the nineteenth-century "Southern Question" concerning the Mezzogiorno’s history, culture and people and its lingering negative image in Europe and America. It also focuses on specific histories, authors and historiographical issues, and reviews how new understandings of the Mediterranean have begun to alter our perceptions of the South in a new global context and as the basis for new historical research.

Moving Women Moving Objects (400–1500)

Moving Women Moving Objects (400–1500)

Author: Tracy Chapman Hamilton

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004399679

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 376

View: 545

The present collection forges new ground in the discussion of aristocratic and royal women, their relationships with their objects, and how they, through this material record, navigated the often-disparate spaces of Byzantium, Eastern, and Western Europe from 400 to 1500.

The Crusades and Visual Culture

The Crusades and Visual Culture

Author: LauraJ Whatley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351545266

Category: Art

Page: 286

View: 731

The crusades, whether realized or merely planned, had a profound impact on medieval and early modern societies. Numerous scholars in the fields of history and literature have explored the influence of crusading ideas, values, aspirations and anxieties in both the Latin States and Europe. However, there have been few studies dedicated to investigating how the crusading movement influenced and was reflected in medieval visual cultures. Written by scholars from around the world working in the domains of art history and history, the essays in this volume examine the ways in which ideas of crusading were realized in a broad variety of media (including manuscripts, cartography, sculpture, mural paintings, and metalwork). Arguing implicitly for recognition of the conceptual frameworks of crusades that transcend traditional disciplinary boundaries, the volume explores the pervasive influence and diverse expression of the crusading movement from the twelfth through the fifteenth centuries.

Imagining the Human Condition in Medieval Rome

Imagining the Human Condition in Medieval Rome

Author: Kristin B. Aavitsland

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 140943818X

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 124

The first monograph on the Vita Humana cycle at Tre Fontane, this book includes an overview of the medieval history of the Roman Cistercian abbey and its architecture, as well as a consideration of the political and cultural standing of the abbey both within Papal Rome and within the Cistercian order. It considers the commission of the fresco cycle, the circumstances of its making and its position within the art historical context of the Roman Duecento. Examining the unusual blend of images in the Vita Humana cycle, this study offers a more nuanced picture of the iconographic repertoire of medieval art.

Manuscripts, Market and the Transition to Print in Late Medieval Brittany

Manuscripts, Market and the Transition to Print in Late Medieval Brittany

Author: Diane E. Booton

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 0754666239

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 494

View: 388

This volume surveys the production and marketing of non-monastic manuscripts and printed books over 150 years in late medieval Brittany. Through analysis of the physical aspects of Breton manuscripts and books, and of the prices, wages and commissions associated with their manufacture, Diane Booton exposes connections between the tangible cultural artifacts and the society that produced, acquired and valued them.

Art as Politics in Late Medieval and Renaissance Siena

Art as Politics in Late Medieval and Renaissance Siena

Author: Timothy B. Smith

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409400662

Category: Art

Page: 252

View: 576

Clearly establishing uniquely Sienese artistic agendas and vocabulary, the essays collected here broaden our understanding of the intersection of art, politics and religion in Siena by revisiting its medieval origins and exploring its continuing role in the Renaissance. Engaging issues of the politicization of art in Sienese painting, sculpture, architecture and urban design, the volume challenges the still-prevalent myth of Siena's cultural and artistic conservatism after the mid-fourteenth century.