The 1960s Cultural Revolution

The 1960s Cultural Revolution

Author: Joel P. Rhodes

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440876290

Category:

Page: 237

View: 567

This book uses evidence-based primary source analysis to provide students with the historical perspective necessary to think critically about the romantic memories, stubborn stereotypes, misperceptions, deliberate falsehoods, distorted myths, and old grudges that distort our popular perceptions of the 1960s. Twenty-first century Americans routinely use the 1960s as a metaphor, a sort of convenient shorthand, for the cultural wars--that continuous clash over differing values, beliefs, attitudes, and lifestyles--still bitterly polarizing the nation. Therefore, understanding the 1960s cultural revolution is critical to understanding ourselves. What this book contributes to that conversation is needed historical perspective with evidence-based primary source analysis. Ten chapters shed light on ordinarily overlooked aspects of the period, challenge stubborn misconceptions, and explore the enduring legacy of the 1960s. Primary source material--both written and visual--is drawn from archival holdings, newspapers, published proceedings, oral histories, and memoirs in order to present a balanced, accessible examination of mistaken beliefs and the historical truths. Features 10 chapters, arranged topically and chronologically, covering 10 misconceptions related to the 1960s cultural revolution Highlights source material drawn from archival holdings, newspapers, published proceedings, oral histories, and memoirs Includes photographs that make the material accessible across a wide range of grade levels Explores how the 1960s cultural revolution continues to influence America in such examples as LGBTQ Pride, Black Lives Matter, Me Too, environmentalism, disability rights, and modern conservatism

The 1960s Cultural Revolution: Facts and Fictions

The 1960s Cultural Revolution: Facts and Fictions

Author: Joel P. Rhodes

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440876301

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 259

This book uses evidence-based primary source analysis to provide students with the historical perspective necessary to think critically about the romantic memories, stubborn stereotypes, misperceptions, deliberate falsehoods, distorted myths, and old grudges that distort our popular perceptions of the 1960s.

Chinese Fiction of the Cultural Revolution

Chinese Fiction of the Cultural Revolution

Author: Lan Yang

Publisher: Hong Kong University Press

ISBN: 9789622094673

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 355

View: 188

The book covers the choice of subject matter, authorship and readership of Cultural Revolution fiction. It analyses the characterization of heroes promoted in the literary and artistic field during this period. By comparing Cultural Revolution fiction with the fiction of the preceding period, with Soviet fiction, and with some traditional Chinese and Western fiction, this analysis emphasizes the ideological and cultural significance of the characteristics shown in the heroes personal background and their physical, temperamental and behavioural qualities, etc. This book will be of significant benefit to both students and scholars of Chinese literature, language and society.

Pandemics, Authoritarian Populism, and Science Fiction

Pandemics, Authoritarian Populism, and Science Fiction

Author: Jeremiah Morelock

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000353778

Category: Social Science

Page: 140

View: 246

With a focus on I Am Legend and Day of the Dead—two series of film remakes of popular science fiction stories—this book addresses the social origins of the recent surge in authoritarian and populist social movements. Exploring the ways in which the themes of tribalism, confidence in medical science, and confidence in military violence changed over the years in the process of re-telling these stories in popular culture, the author identifies the shift towards a narrowing of moral scope, an embrace of military violence and a distrust of medical science with three elements of authoritarian populism: tribalism, distrust of rational elites and their institutions, and willingness for violent coercion. An engaging study of popular culture that sheds light on contemporary political attitudes, Pandemics, Authoritarian Populism, and Science Fiction will appeal to scholars of sociology, social theory, and cultural studies with interests in critical theory, film studies, and science fiction.

Factual Fictions

Factual Fictions

Author: Leonora Flis

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443824774

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 250

View: 212

Factual Fictions: Narrative Truth and the Contemporary American Documentary Novel focuses on contemporary American documentary narratives, specifically the documentary novel, as it re-emerged in the 1960s and later developed into various other forms. The book explores the connections between the documentary novel and the concurrent rise of New Journalism (a.k.a. “literary journalism”) in the United States, situating the two genres in the cultural context of the tumultuous 1960s and an emerging postmodern ethos. Flis makes a comprehensive analysis of texts by Truman Capote, Norman Mailer, John Berendt, and Don DeLillo, while tackling discussions on various theoretical complexities with assurance and rigor. Interested in the precarious divide between fact and fiction, the author productively complicates traditional notions of the two poles. Furthermore, the book examines parallels between contemporary Slovene documentary narratives and their American counterparts. Flis’s work, with its systematic and innovative approach to the subject matter, adds an important historical dimension to the developing field of literary journalism studies as well as to the more established area of 20th Century American literature.

Cultural Revolution Manuscripts

Cultural Revolution Manuscripts

Author: Lena Henningsen

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030733834

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 678

This book investigates handwritten entertainment fiction (shouchaoben wenxue) which circulated clandestinely during the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Lena Henningsen’s analyses of exemplary stories and their variation across different manuscript copies brings to light the creativity of these readers-turned-copyists. Through copying, readers modified the stories and became secondary authors who reflected on the realities of the Cultural Revolution. Through an enquiry into actual reading practices as mapped in autobiographical accounts and into intertextual references within the stories, the book also positions manuscript fiction within the larger reading cosmos of the long 1970s. Henningsen analyzes the production, circulation and consumption of these texts, considering continuities across the alleged divide of the end of the Mao-era and the beginning of the reform period. The book further reveals how these texts achieved fruitful afterlives as re-published bestsellers or as adaptations into comic books or movies, continuing to shape the minds of their audience and the imaginations of the past. Chapter 5 is available open access under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License via link.springer.com.

Fact and Fiction

Fact and Fiction

Author: John Hollowell

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469622880

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 204

View: 797

Journalists and novelists responded to the pervasive social changes of the 1960s in America with a variety of experiments in nonfiction. Those who have praised the vitality of the new journalism have seen it as a fusion of the journalist's passion for detail and the novelist's moral vision. Hollowell presents a critically sharp portrait of what the new journalists and novelists are doing and why. The author concludes that future writing will further obscure the difference between fact and fiction. Originally published in 1977. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

Family Fictions and Family Facts

Family Fictions and Family Facts

Author: Brian Cooper

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134747566

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 320

View: 648

Classical political economy rests on the assumption that the market and the family are overlapping and mutually dependent realms, dominated in turn by economic men and domestic women. Here, Brian Cooper explores the role of economic theory in 'normalizing' the family in the first half of the nineteenth century. Drawing on a wide range of sources - novels, books on etiquette and statistical sources, as well as works of economics - the book examines the impacts of these different forms on contemporary debate and will be of interest to historians of economic thought, feminist economics and those interested in rhetoric and economics.

Latinos, Inc.

Latinos, Inc.

Author: Arlene Dávila

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520274693

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 653

"Davila has entered the back rooms of a new and important sector of the advertising industry, shedding light on the people and businesses that are working to exploit the marketing hot buttons of Hispanic USA. Latinos, Inc. could become a scholarly milestone, a vivid portrayal of the strange marriage between cultural anthropology and merchandising strategies that forms an elemental ingredient of U.S. consumer society."—Stuart Ewen, author of PR! A Social History of Spin "A work derived from prodigious fieldwork that sets a standard for the ethnography of cultural institutions in their varied corporate forms and market participations. Latinos Inc. provides a rich, fascinating, and fresh empirical venue for theories of identity and ethnicity in the U.S."—George Marcus, author of Ethnography Through Thick &Thin "An insightful and compelling account of Hispanic marketing and television as it becomes a significant force in U.S. corporate media. In its rigorous attention to the culture of marketing, Latinos, Inc. fills a significant void within the literature on mass communications, marketing, and television studies."—Chon A. Noriega, author of Shot in America: Television, the State, and the Rise of Chicano Cinema "Davila is the first to show us the world of Latin media through the eyes of advertising and programming professionals; the first to comprehend how Spanish language network television has reconfigured Latino identity; and the first to fully delineate the plurality and heterogeneity of Latino audiences. She enables us to understand the formative role played by advertising and commercial culture in shaping the contours of contemporary Latino/a identities. Latinos, Inc. sets a new standard for scholarship in ethnic studies and cultural studies."—George Lipsitz, author of The Possessive Investment in Whiteness : How White People Profit from Identity Politics

British Fictions of the Sixties

British Fictions of the Sixties

Author: Sebastian Groes

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781441117069

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 152

British Fictions of the Sixties focuses on the major socio-political changes that marked the sixties in relationship to the development of literature over the decade. This book is the first critical study to acknowledge that the 1960s can only be understood if, next to its contemporary socio-political history, its fictions and mythologies are acknowledged as a vital constituent in the understanding of the decade. Groes uncovers a major epistemological shift, and presents a powerful meta-narrative about post-war literature in the UK, and beyond. British Fictions of the Sixties offers a re-examination of canonical writers such as Iris Murdoch, Angela Carter, Muriel Spark and John Fowles. It also pays critical attention to avant-garde writers including Ann Quinn, Bridget Brophy, Eva Figes, Christine Brooke-Rose, and J. G. Ballard, presenting a comprehensive insight into the continuing power the decade exerts on the contemporary imagination.

A History of Modern Chinese Fiction

A History of Modern Chinese Fiction

Author: Chih-tsing Hsia

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253213118

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 784

View: 721

First published in 1961, and reissued in new editions several times, this is the pioneering, classic study of 20th-century Chinese fiction. The book covers some 60 years, from the Literary Revolution of 1917 through the Cultural Revolution of 1966-76. C. T. Hsia, Prof. Emeritus of Chinese at Columbia Univ., examines the major writers from Lu Hsun to Eileen Chang and representative works since 1949 from both mainland China and Taiwan. The first serious study of modern Chinese fiction in English, this book is also the best study of its subject available. Not only the specialist, but every reader who is interested in China or in literature will find it of interest. Hsia's astute insights and graceful writing make the book enjoyable as well as deeply edifying.

Science Fiction Cinema and 1950s Britain

Science Fiction Cinema and 1950s Britain

Author: Matthew Jones

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781501322563

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 241

View: 990

For the last sixty years discussion of 1950s science fiction cinema has been dominated by claims that the genre reflected US paranoia about Soviet brainwashing and the nuclear bomb. However, classic films, such as Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) and It Came from Outer Space (1953), and less familiar productions, such as It! The Terror from Beyond Space (1958), were regularly exported to countries across the world. The histories of their encounters with foreign audiences have not yet been told. Science Fiction Cinema and 1950s Britain begins this task by recounting the story of 1950s British cinema-goers and the aliens and monsters they watched on the silver screen. Drawing on extensive archival research, Matthew Jones makes an exciting and important intervention by locating American science fiction films alongside their domestic counterparts in their British contexts of release and reception. He offers a radical reassessment of the genre, demonstrating for the first time that in Britain, which was a significant market for and producer of science fiction, these films gave voice to different fears than they did in America. While Americans experienced an economic boom, low immigration and the conferring of statehood on Alaska and Hawaii, Britons worried about economic uncertainty, mass immigration and the dissolution of the Empire. Science Fiction Cinema and 1950s Britain uses these and other differences between the British and American experiences of the 1950s to tell a new history of the decade's science fiction cinema, exploring for the first time the ways in which the genre came to mean something unique to Britons.