Speaking of Epidemics in Chinese Medicine

Speaking of Epidemics in Chinese Medicine

Author: Marta Hanson

Publisher:

ISBN: 0415835356

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 709

This book traces the history of the Chinese concept of "Warm diseases" (wenbing) from antiquity to the SARS epidemic. Following wenbing from its birth to maturity and even life in modern times Marta Hanson approaches the history of Chinese medicine from a new angle. She explores the possibility of replacing older narratives that stress progress and linear development with accounts that pay attention to geographic, intellectual, and cultural diversity. By doing so her book integrates the history of Chinese medicine into broader historical studies in a way that has not so far been attempted, and addresses the concerns of a readership much wider than that of Chinese medicine specialists. The persistence of wenbing and other Chinese disease concepts in the present can be interpreted as resistance to the narrowing of meaning in modern biomedical nosology. Attention to conceptions of disease and space reveal a previously unexamined discourse the author calls the Chinese geographic imagination. Tracing the changing meanings of "Warm diseases" over two thousand years allows for the exploration of pre-modern understandings of the nature of epidemics, their intersection with this geographic imagination, and how conceptions of geography shaped the sociology of medical practice and knowledge in late imperial China. Speaking of Epidemics in Chinese Medicine opens a new window on interpretive themes in Chinese cultural history as well as on contemporary studies of the history of science and medicine beyond East Asia.

Speaking of Epidemics in Chinese Medicine

Speaking of Epidemics in Chinese Medicine

Author: Marta Hanson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136816420

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 289

"This book is the biography of a Chinese disease. Born in antiquity and reaching maturity during the epidemics that swept China during the seventeenth-century collapse of the Ming dynasty, the ancient notion of wenbing Warm diseases continued to play a role even in the response of Traditional Chinese Medicine to the outbreak of SARS in 2002-3. By following wenbing from its birth to maturity and even life in modern times this book approaches the history of Chinese medicine from a new angle. It explores the possibility of replacing older narratives that stress progress and linear development with accounts that pay attention to geographic, intellectual, and cultural diversity. By doing so it integrates the history of Chinese medicine into broader historical studies in a way that has not so far been attempted, and addresses the concerns of a readership much wider than that of Chinese medicine specialists"--Provided by publisher.

Routledge Handbook of Chinese Medicine

Routledge Handbook of Chinese Medicine

Author: Vivienne Lo

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781135008970

Category: History

Page: 796

View: 237

The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Medicine is an extensive, interdisciplinary guide to the nature of traditional medicine and healing in the Chinese cultural region, and its plural epistemologies. Established experts and the next generation of scholars interpret the ways in which Chinese medicine has been understood and portrayed from the beginning of the empire (third century BCE) to the globalisation of Chinese products and practices in the present day, taking in subjects from ancient medical writings to therapeutic movement, to talismans for healing and traditional medicines that have inspired global solutions to contemporary epidemics. The volume is divided into seven parts: Longue Durée and Formation of Institutions and Traditions Sickness and Healing Food and Sex Spiritual and Orthodox Religious Practices The World of Sinographic Medicine Wider Diasporas Negotiating Modernity This handbook therefore introduces the broad range of ideas and techniques that comprise pre-modern medicine in China, and the historiographical and ethnographic approaches that have illuminated them. It will prove a useful resource to students and scholars of Chinese studies, and the history of medicine and anthropology. It will also be of interest to practitioners, patients and specialists wishing to refresh their knowledge with the latest developments in the field. The Open Access version of this book, available at http://www.taylorfrancis.com, has been made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 4.0 license

Epidemics in Modern Asia

Epidemics in Modern Asia

Author: Robert Peckham

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107084681

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 401

The first history of epidemics in modern Asia. Robert Peckham considers the varieties of responses that epidemics have elicited - from India to China and the Russian Far East - and examines the processes that have helped to produce and diffuse disease across the region.

Historical epistemology and the making of modern Chinese medicine

Historical epistemology and the making of modern Chinese medicine

Author: Howard Chiang

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781784991913

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 151

This collection expands the history of Chinese medicine by bridging the philosophical concerns of epistemology and the history and cultural politics of transregional medical formations. Topics range from the spread of gingko’s popularity from East Asia to the West to the appeal of acupuncture for complementing in-vitro fertilisation regimens, from the modernisation of Chinese anatomy and forensic science to the evolving perceptions of the clinical efficacy of Chinese medicine. The individual essays cohere around the powerful theoretical-methodological approach, 'historical epistemology', which challenges the seemingly constant and timeless status of such rudimentary but pivotal dimensions of scientific process as knowledge, reason, argument, objectivity, evidence, fact, and truth. In studying the globalising role of medical objects, the contested premise of medical authority and legitimacy, and the syncretic transformations of metaphysical and ontological knowledge, contributors illuminate how the breadth of the historical study of Chinese medicine and its practices of knowledge-making in the modern period must be at once philosophical and transnational in scope.

The Making of Modern Chinese Medicine, 1850-1960

The Making of Modern Chinese Medicine, 1850-1960

Author: Bridie Andrews

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 9780774824354

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 141

Medical care in nineteenth-century China was spectacularly pluralistic: herbalists, shamans, bone-setters, midwives, priests, and a few medical missionaries from the West all competed for patients. This book examines the dichotomy between "Western" and "Chinese" medicine, showing how it has been greatly exaggerated. As missionaries went to lengths to make their medicine more acceptable to Chinese patients, modernizers of Chinese medicine worked to become more "scientific" by eradicating superstition and creating modern institutions. Andrews challenges the supposed superiority of Western medicine in China while showing how "traditional" Chinese medicine was deliberately created in the image of a modern scientific practice.

Film and the Chinese Medical Humanities

Film and the Chinese Medical Humanities

Author: Vivienne Lo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429017391

Category: Medical

Page: 252

View: 595

Film and the Chinese Medical Humanities is the first book to reflect on the power of film in representing medical and health discourse in China in both the past and the present, as well as in shaping its future. Drawing on both feature and documentary films from mainland China, the chapters each engage with the field of medicine through the visual arts. They cover themes such as the history of doctors and their concepts of disease and therapies, understanding the patient experience of illness and death, and establishing empathy and compassion in medical practice, as well as the HIV/AIDs epidemic during the 1980s and 90s and changing attitudes towards disability. Inherently interdisciplinary in nature, the contributors therefore provide different perspectives from the fields of history, psychiatry, film studies, anthropology, linguistics, public health and occupational therapy, as they relate to China and people who identify as Chinese. Their combined approaches are united by a passion for improving the cross-cultural understanding of the body and ultimately healthcare itself. A key resource for educators in the Medical Humanities, this book will be useful to students and scholars of Chinese Studies and Film Studies as well as global health, medical anthropology and medical history.

Mittelalterliche Rechtstexte und mantische Praktiken

Mittelalterliche Rechtstexte und mantische Praktiken

Author: Klaus Herbers

Publisher:

ISBN: 3412520497

Category:

Page: 152

View: 796

Prognostik, Divination, Mantik und Wahrsagerei sind im mittelalterlichen Recht vielfach gegenwärtig. Doch rechtfertigt die Gegenwart dieser Thematik in den Rechtsquellen einen Rückschluss auf die Praxis? Reagierten die einzelnen Texte tatsächlich auf jeweils zeitgenössische Praktiken oder wurde vielleicht nur älteres Traditionsgut aus rechtssystematischen Gründen immer wieder fortgeschrieben? Von der Beantwortung dieser Frage hängt auch ab, welchen Stellenwert die prognostischen Praktiken in der Lebenswelt besaßen. In diesem Band analysieren ausgewiesene Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler nicht nur, in welcher Varianz und in welcher Kontinuität die Thematik der Prognostik in Rechtstexten des frühen und hohen Mittelalters erscheint, sondern fragen auch nach Überlieferung und Sitz im Leben. Zu den untersuchten Quellen gehören Sammlungen kirchlichen und weltlichen Rechts, Bußbücher sowie päpstliche Schreiben.

Chinese Medicine and Healing

Chinese Medicine and Healing

Author: TJ Hinrichs

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674258242

Category: Medical

Page: 470

View: 109

"Chinese Medicine and Healing is a comprehensive introduction to a rich array of Chinese healing practices as they have developed through time and across cultures. Contributions from fifty-eight leading international scholars in such fields as Chinese archaeology, history, anthropology, religion, and medicine make this a collaborative work of uncommon intellectual synergy, and a vital new resource for anyone working in East Asian or world history, in medical history and anthropology, and in biomedicine and complementary healing arts. This illustrated history explores the emergence and development of a wide range of health interventions, including propitiation of disease-inflicting spirits, divination, vitality-cultivating meditative disciplines, herbal remedies, pulse diagnosis, and acupuncture. The authors investigate processes that contribute to historical change, such as competition between different types of practitioner—shamans, Daoist priests, Buddhist monks, scholar physicians, and even government officials. Accompanying vignettes and illustrations bring to life such diverse arenas of health care as childbirth in the Tang period, Yuan state-established medical schools, fertility control in the Qing, and the search for sexual potency in the People’s Republic. The two final chapters illustrate Chinese healing modalities across the globe and address the challenges they have posed as alternatives to biomedical standards of training and licensure. The discussion includes such far-reaching examples as Chinese treatments for diphtheria in colonial Australia and malaria in Africa, the invention of ear acupuncture by the French and its worldwide dissemination, and the varying applications of acupuncture from Germany to Argentina and Iraq."

Classical Chinese Medicine

Classical Chinese Medicine

Author: Keekok Lee

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781527514263

Category: Medical

Page: 509

View: 103

This volume completes a trilogy (Lee, 2012, 2017) on the philosophy of medicine, Western and Chinese. Its immediate prequel (Lee, 2017) sets out in general outline the philosophical and methodological core of Classical Chinese Medicine (CCM); this volume fleshes out that “skeleton” by examining in detail its peculiar concepts and characteristics, such as Getihua/Personalised Medicine, Preventive Medicine, Tianren-xiangying (Macro-Micro-cosmic Wholism), Zhèng-Fang Wholism (Wholism at the level of diagnosis and treatment), and Mind-Body Wholism (the person as primitive concept). CCM is here shown to instantiate “ecosystem science”, which is post-Newtonian in orientation, departing from familiar Newtonian landmarks such as Reductionism and linearity, resting on thing-ontology for a non-reductionist, non-linear science. This approach highlights a rich irony and paradox: namely, how CCM in being backward-looking (relying on classical texts as foundational texts and prescriptions of some two thousand years standing) simultaneously manages to be at the cutting edge of scientific thinking today.

The Politics of Chinese Medicine Under Mongol Rule

The Politics of Chinese Medicine Under Mongol Rule

Author: Reiko Shinno

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317671596

Category: History

Page: 194

View: 404

Under the rule of the descendants of Chinggis Khan (1167-1227), China saw the development of a new culture in which medical practice came to be considered a highly respected occupation for elite men. During this period, further major steps were also taken towards the codification of medical knowledge and promotion of physicians’ social status. This book traces the history of the politics, institutions, and culture of medicine of China under Mongol rule, through the eyes of a successful South Chinese official Yuan Jue (1266-1327). As the first comprehensive monograph on history of medicine in China under the Mongols, it argues that this period was a separate moment in Chinese history, when a configuration of power different from that of previous and succeeding periods created its own medical culture. The Politics of Chinese Medicine under Mongol Rule emphasizes the impact of the political and institutional changes caused by the Mongols and their collaborators on the social and cultural history of medicine, which culminated in the medical theory of Zhu Zhenheng (1282–1358), still influential in East Asian medicine. Using a variety of Chinese-language sources including gazetteers, legal texts, biographies, poems, and medical texts, it analyses the roles of the Mongols and West and Central Asians as cultural brokers and also as unifiers of China. Further, it views North and South Chinese elites as agents of historical change rather than as victims of Mongol oppression. Underlining the complexity of the history of China under the Mongols and the significance of time and geography for the study of this history, this book will be of great interest to students and scholars of Chinese medical history, Chinese social and cultural history, and medieval global history.

Socio-Ecological Dimensions of Infectious Diseases in Southeast Asia

Socio-Ecological Dimensions of Infectious Diseases in Southeast Asia

Author: Serge Morand

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9789812875273

Category: Medical

Page: 338

View: 422

This book pursues a multidisciplinary approach in order to evaluate the socio-ecological dimensions of infectious diseases in Southeast Asia. It includes 18 chapters written by respected researchers in the fields of history, sociology, ecology, epidemiology, veterinary sciences, medicine and the environmental sciences on six major topics: (1) Infectious diseases and societies, (2) Health, infectious diseases and socio-ecosystems; (3) Global changes, land use changes and vector-borne diseases; (4) Monitoring and data acquisition; (5) Managing health risks; and (6) Developing strategies. The book offers a valuable guide for students and researchers in the fields of development and environmental studies, animal and human health (veterinarians, physicians), ecology and conservation biology, especially those with a focus on Southeast Asia.