Southern Gentlemen

Southern Gentlemen

Author: Jennifer Blake

Publisher: Harlequin

ISBN: 9781459235762

Category: Fiction

Page: 238

View: 928

In some small Southern towns the old ways still exist. Breeding counts and the old boys hold court. Everyone has a place and no one's supposed to cross the line. But rules are made to be broken... In Southern Gentlemen, authors Jennifer Blake and Emilie Richards deliver two contemporary stories of family, love and betrayal, all set against the colorful backdrop of the Deep South. This is their South—filled with old families, old money and old grudges. A place where the finest women are ladies and the best men are gentlemen. And where men from the wrong side of town have more honor than all the blue bloods combined.

The Gentlemen and the Roughs

The Gentlemen and the Roughs

Author: Lorien Foote

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479897841

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 655

In this contribution to Civil War and gender history, Lorien Foote reveals that internal battles were fought against the backdrop of manhood. Clashing ideals of manliness produced myriad conflicts when educated, refined, and wealthy officers found themselves commanding a hard-drinking group of fighters.

Sporting Gentlemen

Sporting Gentlemen

Author: E. Digby Baltzell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351488341

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 441

View: 950

Tennis is a high-stakes game, played by prodigies identified early and coached by professionals in hopes of high rankings and endorsements. This commercial world is far removed from the origins of the sport. Before 1968—when Wimbledon invited professional players to compete for the first time—tennis was part of a sportsmanship tradition that emphasized character over money. It produced well-rounded gentlemen who expressed a code of honor, not commerce. In this authoritative and affectionate history of men's tennis, distinguished sociologist E. Digby Baltzell recovers the glory of the age. From its aristocratic origins in the late ninteenth century, to the Tilden years, and through a succession of newcomers, the amateur era and its virtues survived a century of democratization and conflict. Sporting Gentlemen examines the greatest players and matches in the history of tennis. Baltzell explores the tennis code of honor and its roots in the cricket code of the late-nineteenth-century Anglo-American upper class. This code of honor remained in spite of the later democratization of tennis. Thus, the court manners of the Renshaw twins and Doherty brothers at the Old Wimbledon were upheld to the letter by Don Budge and Jack Kramer as well as Rod Laver, John Newcombe, and Arthur Ashe. Baltzell's final chapter on the Open Era is a blistering attack on the decline of honor and the obliteration of class distinctions, leaving only those based on money. For all who love the game of tennis, Sporting Gentlemen is both fascinating history and a badly needed analysis of what has made the sport great.

The Promise of the New South

The Promise of the New South

Author: Edward L. Ayers

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195326888

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 490

A new history of the American South during Reconstruction shows how a complex blending of new ideas and old hatreds developed in the region following the Civil War. By the author of Vengeance and Justice.

Theaters of Madness

Theaters of Madness

Author: Benjamin Reiss

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226709659

Category: Psychology

Page: 240

View: 565

In the mid-1800s, a utopian movement to rehabilitate the insane resulted in a wave of publicly funded asylums—many of which became unexpected centers of cultural activity. Housed in magnificent structures with lush grounds, patients participated in theatrical programs, debating societies, literary journals, schools, and religious services. Theaters of Madness explores both the culture these rich offerings fomented and the asylum’s place in the fabric of nineteenth-century life, reanimating a time when the treatment of the insane was a central topic in debates over democracy, freedom, and modernity. Benjamin Reiss explores the creative lives of patients and the cultural demands of their doctors. Their frequently clashing views turned practically all of American culture—from blackface minstrel shows to the works of William Shakespeare—into a battlefield in the war on insanity. Reiss also shows how asylums touched the lives and shaped the writing of key figures, such as Emerson and Poe, who viewed the system alternately as the fulfillment of a democratic ideal and as a kind of medical enslavement. Without neglecting this troubling contradiction, Theaters of Madness prompts us to reflect on what our society can learn from a generation that urgently and creatively tried to solve the problem of mental illness.