Shipwrecked

Shipwrecked

Author: James V. Morrison

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472119202

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 242

View: 481

Four thousand years of shipwrecks in literature and film

Shipwrecked!

Shipwrecked!

Author: Evan L. Balkan

Publisher: Menasha Ridge Press

ISBN: 9780897328449

Category: Travel

Page: 188

View: 816

For readers who relish the image of clinging to a sinking makeshift raft while fighting off sword-wielding and delirious mutineers wrenching the last cask of water from a sailor's sun-scorched hands (while sharks circle in famished anticipation), Shipwrecked! Adventures and Disasters at Sea is an irresistible read. A heady voyage through human suffering at the hands of unforgiving oceans, cruel captains, and implacable fate, this latest collection of Evan Balkan's impeccably researched true adventures details 14 major maritime disasters. Included are such legendary stories as the 1629 maiden voyage of the Batavia that ended in mutiny and murder, and the dramatic destruction of the majestic three-masted barquentine Endurance in ice-clogged Antarctic waters in 1912. A vast spectrum of human emotion and activity is featured in these exciting profiles, from deadly incompetence and brutish cannibalism to surprising self-sacrifice and quiet heroism.

Shipwrecked!

Shipwrecked!

Author: Jerry Young

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 9780595302307

Category: Fiction

Page: 284

View: 236

Survivors of a cruise ship wrecked during its final voyage face not only the perils that nature throws at them on an uninhabited South Pacific island, but also conflict among themselves. Only one person in the group has the experience and knowledge to enhance their chances of survival. Will he aid the rest, or go off on his own?

Shipwrecked in Paradise

Shipwrecked in Paradise

Author: Paul F. Johnston

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781623492830

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 661

Winner, 2016 Secretary's Research Award, sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution - awarded for author's contributions to research The first oceangoing yacht ever built in America, Cleopatra’s Barge, endured many incarnations over her eight-year life, from Mediterranean pleasure cruiser to a Hawaiian king’s personal yacht. The famed ship, at times also a Christian missionary transport, pirate ship, getaway vehicle, instrument of diplomacy, and racing yacht, wrecked on a reef in Hanalei Bay on April 6, 1824. Obtaining the first underwater archaeological permits ever issued by the state of Hawai‘i, a team of divers from the Smithsonian Institution located, surveyed, and excavated the wrecked ship from 1995 to 2000. The 1,250 lots of artifacts from the shipwreck represent the only known material culture from the reign of King Kamehameha II (Liholiho), shedding light on the little-documented transitional period from Old Hawai‘i to foreign influence and culture. Although Liholiho ruled Hawai‘i for only a few short years, his abolition of taboos and admission of the Boston Christian missionaries into his kingdom planted the seeds for profound changes in Hawaiian culture. Richly illustrated, Shipwrecked in Paradise tells the story of the ship’s life in Hawai‘i, from her 1820 sale to Liholiho to her discovery and excavation.

Sessional Papers

Sessional Papers

Author: Canada. Parliament

Publisher:

ISBN: HARVARD:HWM2V3

Category: Canada

Page: 652

View: 361

"Report of the Dominion fishery commission on the fisheries of the province of Ontario, 1893", issued as vol. 26, no. 7, supplement.

Sessional Papers

Sessional Papers

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015068431603

Category: Canada

Page:

View: 988

"Report of the Dominion fishery commission on the fisheries of the province of Ontario, 1893", issued as vol. 26, no. 7, supplement.

The Society of Prisoners

The Society of Prisoners

Author: Renaud Morieux

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198723585

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 643

In the eighteenth century, as wars between Britain, France, and their allies raged across the world, hundreds of thousands of people were captured, detained, or exchanged. They were shipped across oceans, marched across continents, or held in an indeterminate limbo. The Society of Prisoners challenges us to rethink the paradoxes of the prisoner of war, defined at once as an enemy and as a fellow human being whose life must be spared. Amidst the emergence of new codifications of international law, the practical distinctions between a prisoner of war, a hostage, a criminal, and a slave were not always clear-cut. Renaud Morieux's vivid and lucid account uses war captivity as a point of departure, investigating how the state transformed itself at war, and how whole societies experienced international conflicts. The detention of foreigners on home soil created the conditions for multifaceted exchanges with the host populations, involving prison guards, priests, pedlars, and philanthropists. Thus, while the imprisonment of enemies signals the extension of Anglo-French rivalry throughout the world, the mass incarceration of foreign soldiers and sailors also illustrates the persistence of non-conflictual relations amidst war. Taking the reader beyond Britain and France, as far as the West Indies and St Helena, this story resonates in our own time, questioning the dividing line between war and peace, and forcing us to confront the untenable situations in which the status of the enemy is left to the whim of the captor.