Schooling and Social Change 1964-1990

Schooling and Social Change 1964-1990

Author: Roy Lowe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134706068

Category: Education

Page: 208

View: 743

This is the first book to offer an overview of the ways in which the sweeping social and economic changes of the modern period have impacted on the education system. Roy Lowe draws on estensive research to paint a vivid picture of the ways in which schools and universities were moulded by external events and of the part they played in promoting modernisation of society. The book explores some key themes: * the nature of the economic transformations taking place; * the growing awareness of gender issues; * the changing ethnic composition of modern Britain; * the bureaucratisation of society and the rise of a new politics. Exploring the links between these issues and educational provision, Lowe argues that the growing political significance of educational issues is largely explained by the critical part played by the education system in providing social and economic stability during these years of swift social change. Roy Lowe is Professor of Education at the University of Wales, Swansea.

Schooling and Social Change 1964-1990

Schooling and Social Change 1964-1990

Author: Roy Lowe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134706051

Category: Education

Page: 208

View: 875

This is the first book to offer an overview of the ways in which the sweeping social and economic changes of the modern period have impacted on the education system. Roy Lowe draws on estensive research to paint a vivid picture of the ways in which schools and universities were moulded by external events and of the part they played in promoting modernisation of society. The book explores some key themes: * the nature of the economic transformations taking place; * the growing awareness of gender issues; * the changing ethnic composition of modern Britain; * the bureaucratisation of society and the rise of a new politics. Exploring the links between these issues and educational provision, Lowe argues that the growing political significance of educational issues is largely explained by the critical part played by the education system in providing social and economic stability during these years of swift social change. Roy Lowe is Professor of Education at the University of Wales, Swansea.

Schooling and Social Change Since 1760

Schooling and Social Change Since 1760

Author: Roy Lowe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351169547

Category: Education

Page: 206

View: 957

Schooling and Social Change in England since 1760 offers a powerful critique of the situation of British education today and shows the historical processes that have helped generate the crisis confronting policymakers and practitioners at the present time. The book identifies the key phases of economic and social change since 1760 and shows how the education system has played a central role in embedding, sustaining and deepening social distinctions in Britain. Covering the whole period since the first industrialization, it gives a detailed account of the development of a deeply divided education system that leads to quite separate lifestyles for those from differing backgrounds. The book develops arguments of inequalities through a much-needed account of the changes in education. This book will be of great interest for academics, scholars and post-graduate students in the field of history of education and education politics. It will also appeal to administrators, teachers and policy makers, especially those interested in the historical development of schooling.

Education Policy and Realist Social Theory

Education Policy and Realist Social Theory

Author: Robert Archer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134493548

Category: Education

Page: 272

View: 970

In Europe welfare state provision has been subjected to 'market forces'. Over the last two decades, the framework of economic competitiveness has become the defining aim of education, to be achieved by new managerialist techniques and mechanisms. This book thoughtfully and persuasively argues against this new vision of education, and offers a different, more useful potential approach. This in-depth major study will be of great interest to researchers in the sociology of education, education policy, social theory, organization and management studies, and also to professionals concerned about the deleterious impact of current education policy on children's learning and welfare.

The TUC and Education Reform, 1926-1970

The TUC and Education Reform, 1926-1970

Author: Dr Clive Griggs

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134724017

Category: Education

Page: 320

View: 147

This book covers a crucial period for the development of state education in Britain; the advent of the comprehensive debate before and during the Second World War; the War years themselves and the 1944 Education Act; the post-War Labour Government; and Churchill's last government in a time of education expansion. From the 1960s, the focus shifted to questions of social deprivation and educational opportunities, secondary school selection, the debate on standards, Robbins and higher education, and the continuing theme of the dominance of public schools. The book is divided into four sections, which are then divided into chapters. Each chapter takes as its main reference point a key issue within the chronological framework of the book, e.g. resistance to secondary education for all, politics and textbooks, multilateral and technical schools, pressure groups and the 1944 Education Act, Churchill and the Conservatives. Much new light is thrown on the topics by the author's use of new material and he has made a valuable contribution to the politics of education.

Education and Economic Decline in Britain, 1870 to the 1990s

Education and Economic Decline in Britain, 1870 to the 1990s

Author: Michael Sanderson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521588421

Category: History

Page: 142

View: 349

Since the 1870s the British economy has steadily declined from its position as the 'workshop of the world' to that of a low-ranking European power. Michael Sanderson examines the question of how far defects in education and training have contributed to this economic decline. By looking at issues such as literacy, the quality of scientific and technical training, the supposed anti-industrial bias of public schools and the older universities, the neglect of vocational and technical training and the neglect of the non-academic teenager, Michael Sanderson demonstrates that education was far from the sole cause of economic decline, but that its deficiencies have certainly played a part. This book offers an accessible and concise analysis of a topic of current importance, interest and debate and will be of interest to students and teachers of the history of education and its impact on British economic development in the twentieth century.

The SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction

The SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction

Author: F. Michael Connelly

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 9781452208855

Category: Education

Page: 624

View: 819

The SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction emerges from a concept of curriculum and instruction as a diverse landscape defined and bounded by schools, school boards and their communities, policy, teacher education, and academic research. Each contributing author was asked to comprehensively review the research literature in their assigned topic. These topics, however, are defined by practical places on the landscape e.g. schools and governmental policies for schools. Key Features: o Presents a different vision or re-conceptualization of the field o Provides a comprehensive and inclusive set of authors, ideas, and topics o Takes a global rather than North American parochial approach o Recognizes that curriculum and instruction is broader in scope than is suggested by university research and theory o Reflects post-1992 changes in curriculum policy, practice and scholarship o Represents a rethinking of how school subject matter areas are treated. Teacher education is included in the Handbook with the intent of addressing the role and place of teacher education in bridging state and national curriculum policies and curriculum as enacted in classrooms.

A Companion to Life Course Studies

A Companion to Life Course Studies

Author: Michael E.J. Wadsworth

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781134005789

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 154

Since the end of the Second World War, society has been characterised by rapid and extensive political, economic, scientific, and technological change. Opportunities for education, employment, human relations, and good health, have all been greatly affected by those changes, as have all aspects of life. Consequently, each post-war generation has been like no other before or since. Britain, uniquely, has five large-scale life course studies that began at intervals throughout that period. They have shown how lives are shaped by individual characteristics, their past and current experiences and opportunities, and so reflect their times. This book describes those fundamental changes that affected life chances differently in each generation, and how governments struggled to accommodate the changes with new policies for improving and managing the nation's capital in terms of education, family policy, health, human rights, and economics. A Companion to Life Course Studies provides a resource for the interpretation of the findings and design differences in the five studies, and the stimulus for new comparisons of life course between these differing generations that would contribute to policy and to understanding.

Women in Britain

Women in Britain

Author: Janet H. Howarth

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781786724243

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 335

The millennium has sharpened perspectives on the history of women in twentieth-century Britain. Many features of the contemporary gender order date only from the last decades of the century – the expectation of equal opportunities in education and the work-place, sexual autonomy for the individual and tolerance of a variety of family forms. The years dominated by the two World Wars saw real advances towards equal citizenship and legal rights, and a growing sense of the impact on women of 'modernity' in its various forms, including consumerism and the mass media. But values inherited from the Victorians were still reflected in the class hierarchy, the policing of sexuality and the male-breadwinner family. This anthology of original sources, accompanied by a state-of-the-art bibliography, illustrates patterns of continuity and change in women's experience and their place in national life. An introductory survey provides an accessible overview and analysis of controversial issues, such as the relationship between 'first', 'second' and 'third' wave feminism.

Education and Social Integration

Education and Social Integration

Author: S. Wiborg

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230622937

Category: Education

Page: 246

View: 805

This book traces national policies behind the efforts of integrating education systems in Europe. Based on a wide-ranging historical analysis, this book offers the first fully comparative explanation of the divergent development of comprehensive education in Europe.

Lost Freedom

Lost Freedom

Author: Mathew Thomson

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191665097

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 102

Lost Freedom addresses the widespread feeling that there has been a fundamental change in the social life of children in recent decades: the loss of childhood freedom, and in particular, the loss of freedom to roam beyond the safety of home. Mathew Thomson explores this phenomenon, concentrating on the period from the Second World War until the 1970s, and considering the roles of psychological theory, traffic, safety consciousness, anxiety about sexual danger, and television in the erosion of freedom. Thomson argues that the Second World War has an important place in this story, with war-borne anxieties encouraging an emphasis on the central importance of a landscape of home. War also encouraged the development of specially designed spaces for the cultivation of the child, including the adventure playground, and the virtual landscape of children's television. However, before the 1970s, British children still had much more physical freedom than they do today. Lost Freedom explores why this situation has changed. The volume pays particular attention to the 1970s as a period of transition, and one which saw radical visions of child liberation, but with anxieties about child protection also escalating in response. This is strikingly demonstrated in the story of how the paedophile emerged as a figure of major public concern. Thomson argues that this crisis of concern over child freedom is indicative of some of the broader problems of the social settlements that had been forged out of the Second World War.

The Crisis of the Meritocracy

The Crisis of the Meritocracy

Author: Peter Mandler

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192576477

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 683

Before the Second World War, only about 20% of the population went to secondary school and barely 2% to university; today everyone goes to secondary school and half of all young people go to university. How did we get here from there? The Crisis of the Meritocracy answers this question not by looking to politicians and educational reforms, but to the revolution in attitudes and expectations amongst the post-war British public - the rights guaranteed by the welfare state, the hope of a better life for one's children, widespread upward mobility from manual to non-manual occupations, confidence in the importance of education in a 'learning society' and a 'knowledge economy'. As a result of these transformations, 'meritocracy' - the idea that a few should be selected to succeed - has been challenged by democracy and its wider understandings of equal opportunity across the life course. At a time when doubts have arisen about whether we need so many students, and amidst calls for a return to grammar-school selection at 11, the tension between meritocracy and democracy remains vital to understanding why our grandparents, our parents, ourselves and our children have sought and got more and more education - and to what end.