Municipal Dreams

Municipal Dreams

Author: John Boughton

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 9781784787417

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 448

Municipal Dreams presents an alternative history of the United Kingdom. This history begins in the slum clearances of the late nineteenth century and the aspirations of those who would build anew. John Boughton looks at how and why the state's duty to house its people decently became central to our politics. Traversing the nation, Boughton offers an architectural tour of some of the best and most remarkable of our housing estates, as well as many accounted ordinary; he asks us to understand better their complex story and to rethink our prejudices. His accounts include extraordinary planners and architects who wished to elevate working men and women through design and the politicians, high and low, who shaped their work, the competing ideologies which have promoted state housing and condemned it, the economics which has always constrained our housing ideals, the crisis wrought by Right to Buy, and the evolving controversies around regeneration. He shows how the loss of the dream of good housing for all is a danger for the whole of society – as was seen in the fire in Grenfell Tower.

History of the Housing Crisis

History of the Housing Crisis

Author: Rebecca Searle

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781786616265

Category: Housing

Page: 139

View: 519

"This book presents a history of the struggle that has brought us to the present crisis. The way housing was organised in mid-twentieth century Britain did a better job of providing people with decent, secure and affordable homes than the way it is ordered today. This was not benevolently bestowed by some caring government but was won through collective struggle. Council housing, rent controls and regulated tenancies represented not only an important set of material gains, but a recognition by the state that it had a responsibility to house the people. During the 1980s these gains were eroded and ever since successive governments from both political camps have sought to remove the state from the provision and regulation of housing. This transformation was also the result of political struggle. This book demonstrates that housing was a key vehicle through which neoliberal ideas were translated into policy and practice. By every measure this experiment has been a failure. Through an understanding of the range of strategies deployed in the struggle for better housing, we can begin to work out how to continue this fight today"--

Taking Power Back

Taking Power Back

Author: Simon Parker

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 9781447326878

Category: Political Science

Page: 192

View: 180

One of the key issues of our time is the question of where power and governance should lie. Should they be centrally controlled, drawing on efficiencies of scale and gathered knowledge? Or should they be more locally distributed, so that they more closely represent the actual needs of people and communities? In Taking Power Back, Simon Parker makes a powerful case for the latter: centralization, he argues, has been largely a failure, breeding distrust among citizens—who, he shows, are beginning to take matters into their own hands. Offering policy recommendations and practical suggestions, Parker argues for a new kind of politics, one that can fully unleash society's creative potential.

London's Aylesbury Estate

London's Aylesbury Estate

Author: Michael Romyn

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030514778

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 301

This book looks beyond the Aylesbury’s public face by examining its rise and fall from the perspective of those who knew it, based largely on the oral testimony and memoir of residents and former residents, youth and community workers, borough Councillors, officials, police officers and architects. What emerges is not a simple story of definitive failures, but one of texture and complexity, struggle and accord, family and friends, and of rapidly changing circumstances. The study spans the years 1967 to 2010 – from the estate’s ambitious inception until the first of its blocks were pulled down. It is a period rarely dealt with by historians of council housing, who have typically confined themselves to the years before or after the 1979 watershed. As such, it demonstrates how shifts in housing policy, and broader political, economic and social developments, came to bear on a working-class community – for good and, more especially, for ill.

Municipal Dreams

Municipal Dreams

Author: John Boughton

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 9781784787400

Category: Political Science

Page: 0

View: 355

A narrative history of council housing—from slums to the Grenfell Tower Urgent, timely and compelling, Municipal Dreams brilliantly brings the national story of housing to life. In this landmark reappraisal of council housing, historian John Boughton presents an alternative history of Britain. Rooted in the ambition to end slum living, and the ideals of those who would build a new society, Municipal Dreams looks at how the state’s duty to house its people decently became central to our politics. The book makes it clear why that legacy and its promise should be defended. Traversing the nation in this comprehensive social, political and architectural history of council housing, Boughton offers a tour of some of the best and most remarkable of our housing estates—some happily ordinary, some judged notorious. He asks us to understand their complex story and to rethink our prejudices. His accounts include extraordinary planners and architects who wished to elevate working men and women through design; the competing ideologies that have promoted state housing and condemned it; the economic factors that have always constrained our housing ideals; the crisis wrought by Right to Buy; and the evolving controversies around regeneration. Boughton shows how losing the dream of good housing has weakened our community and hurt its most vulnerable—as was seen most catastrophically in the fire at Grenfell Tower.

Glasgow

Glasgow

Author: Lynn Abrams

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429848414

Category: Architecture

Page: 134

View: 224

In the wake of an unparalleled housing crisis at the end of the Second World War, Glasgow Corporation rehoused the tens of thousands of private tenants who were living in overcrowded and unsanitary conditions in unimproved Victorian slums. Adopting the designs, the materials and the technologies of modernity they built into the sky, developing high-rise estates on vacant sites within the city and on its periphery. This book uniquely focuses on the people's experience of this modern approach to housing, drawing on oral histories and archival materials to reflect on the long-term narrative and significance of high-rise homes in the cityscape. It positions them as places of identity formation, intimacy and well-being. With discussions on interior design and consumption, gender roles, children, the elderly, privacy, isolation, social networks and nuisance, Glasgow examines the connections between architectural design, planning decisions and housing experience to offer some timely and prescient observations on the success and failure of this very modern housing solution at a moment when high flats are simultaneously denigrated in the social housing sector while being built afresh in the private sector. Glasgow is aimed at an academic readership, including postgraduate students, scholars and researchers. It will be of interest to social, cultural and urban historians particularly interested in the United Kingdom.

Passport to Peckham

Passport to Peckham

Author: Robert Hewison

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9781913380052

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 362

An entertaining and engaging social and cultural history of the London community of Peckham that offers lessons in urban living. “Is there life in Peckham?” asks a pop song of the 1980s. Peckham has been treated as a joke and a place to be avoided. It has been celebrated in television comedies, and denigrated for its levels of crime. It is a center for the arts and the creative industries, yet it also suffers from social deprivation and racial tension. Passport to Peckham is a guide to an unofficial part of London—social and cultural history written from the ground up. In this entertaining and engaging account, Hewison invites readers to explore Peckham’s streets and presents the portrait of a community experiencing the stresses of modern living. Old and new residents rub against each other as they try to adjust to the challenges created by urban regeneration and the more subtle process of gentrification. Artists have lived and worked in Peckham for more than a century, and now Caribbean and West African communities are adding their own flavors in terms of music, drama, poetry, and film. Focused on a few square miles, Passport to Peckham raises issues of urban policy, planning, culture, and creativity that have a far wider application. As London and other major cities recover from the COVID crisis, are there lessons in urban living to be learned from the pleasures and pains of Peckham? The answer from one of Britain’s most distinguished cultural critics is an emphatic yes.

Reconstructing Public Housing

Reconstructing Public Housing

Author: Matthew Thompson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9781789621082

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 599

Reconstructing Public Housing unearths Liverpool's hidden history of radical alternatives to municipal housing development and builds a vision of how we might reconstruct public housing on more democratic and cooperative foundations. In this critical social history, Matthew Thompson brings to light how and why this remarkable city became host to two pioneering social movements in collective housing and urban regeneration experimentation. In the 1970s, Liverpool produced one of Britain's largest, most democratic and socially innovative housing co-op movements, including the country's first new-build co-op to be designed, developed and owned by its member-residents. Four decades later, in some of the very same neighbourhoods, several campaigns for urban community land trusts are growing from the grassroots - including the first ever architectural or housing project to be nominated for and win, in 2015, the artworld's coveted Turner Prize. Thompson traces the connections between these movements; how they were shaped by, and in turn transformed, the politics, economics, culture and urbanism of Liverpool. Drawing on theories of capitalism and cooperativism, property and commons, institutional change and urban transformation, Thompson reconsiders Engels' housing question, reflecting on how collective alternatives work in, against and beyond the state and capital, in often surprising and contradictory ways.

GO BIG

GO BIG

Author: Ed Miliband

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781473576438

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 917

How do we rein in the power of Big Tech? How do we tackle the climate crisis? How can all of us play a part in making change happen? For the past four years, Ed Miliband has been discovering and interviewing brilliant people all around the world who are successfully tackling the biggest problems we face, transforming communities and pioneering global movements. Go Big draws on the most imaginative and ambitious of these ideas to provide a vision for the kind of society we need. A better world is possible; the solutions are out there. We can all make a difference. We just need to know where to look - and have the courage to think big. Go Big shows us how. 'Enthralling' PHILIP PULLMAN 'Such a hopeful book' ELIZABETH DAY 'Should be the rallying cry of progressives around the world' RUTGER BREGMAN

Home Truths

Home Truths

Author: Liam Halligan

Publisher: Biteback Publishing

ISBN: 9781785904820

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 109

Housing is increasingly unaffordable in many parts of the UK, with prices and rents rising much faster than earnings because, over many decades, far too few homes have been built. Since the 2008 financial crisis, the homes shortage has become more acute – sending housing affordability to the top of the political agenda. Combining analysis with reportage, Home Truths draws on extensive interviews with cabinet ministers, civil servants, planning officials, leading property executives and priced-out homebuyers from across the country. Informed by deep economic research and political access at the highest level, the book is a no-holds-barred critique of the UK’s chronic housing shortage, concluding with eye-catching policy proposals of direct relevance to both Parliament and regional and national government.

Housing in the United Kingdom

Housing in the United Kingdom

Author: Brian Lund

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030041281

Category: Social Science

Page: 374

View: 755

In this book, Brian Lund builds on contemporary housing crisis narratives, which tend to focus on the growth of a younger ‘generation rent,’ to include the differential effects of class, age, gender, ethnicity and place, across the United Kingdom. Current differences reflect long-established cleavages in UK society, and help to explain why housing crises persist. Placing the UK crises in their global contexts, Lund provides a critical examination of proposed solutions according to their impacts on different pathways through the housing system. As the first detailed analysis of the multifaceted origins, impact and potential solutions of the housing crisis, this book will be of vital interest to policy practitioners, professionals and academics across a wide range of areas, including housing studies, urban studies, geography, social policy, sociology, planning and politics.

Political Philosophy in a Pandemic

Political Philosophy in a Pandemic

Author: Fay Niker

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350225923

Category: Philosophy

Page: 296

View: 374

Government lockdowns, school closures, mass unemployment, health and wealth inequality. Political Philosophy in a Pandemic asks us, where do we go from here? What are the ethics of our response to a radically changed, even more unequal society, and how do we seize the moment for enduring change? Addressing the moral and political implications of pandemic response from states and societies worldwide, the 20 essays collected here cover the most pressing debates relating to the biggest public health crisis in the last century. Discussing the pandemic in five key parts covering social welfare, economic justice, democratic relations, speech and misinformation, and the relationship between justice and crisis, this book reflects the fruitful combination of political theory and philosophy in laying the theoretical and practical foundations for justice in the long-term.