Medicine in the English Middle Ages

Medicine in the English Middle Ages

Author: Faye Getz

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400822676

Category: Medical

Page: 189

View: 664

This book presents an engaging, detailed portrait of the people, ideas, and beliefs that made up the world of English medieval medicine between 750 and 1450, a time when medical practice extended far beyond modern definitions. The institutions of court, church, university, and hospital--which would eventually work to separate medical practice from other duties--had barely begun to exert an influence in medieval England, writes Faye Getz. Sufferers could seek healing from men and women of all social ranks, and the healing could encompass spiritual, legal, and philosophical as well as bodily concerns. Here the author presents an account of practitioners (English Christians, Jews, and foreigners), of medical works written by the English, of the emerging legal and institutional world of medicine, and of the medical ideals present among the educated and social elite. How medical learning gained for itself an audience is the central argument of this book, but the journey, as Getz shows, was an intricate one. Along the way, the reader encounters the magistrates of London, who confiscate a bag said by its owner to contain a human head capable of learning to speak, and learned clerical practitioners who advise people on how best to remain healthy or die a good death. Islamic medical ideas as well as the poetry of Chaucer come under scrutiny. Among the remnants of this far distant medical past, anyone may find something to amuse and something to admire.

Medicine in the Middle Ages

Medicine in the Middle Ages

Author: Juliana Cummings

Publisher: Pen and Sword History

ISBN: 9781526779373

Category: Medical

Page: 226

View: 515

The Middle Ages covers a span of roughly one thousand years, and through that time people were subject to an array of not only deadly diseases but deplorable living conditions. It was a time when cures for sickness were often worse than the illness itself mixed with a population of people who lacked any real understanding of sanitation and cleanliness. Dive in to the history of medieval medicine, and learn how the foundations of healing were built on the knowledge of ancient Greek and Roman philosophers. Understand how your social status would have affected medical care, and how the domination of the Catholic Church was the basis of an abundant amount of fear regarding life and death. We are given an intimate look into the devastating time of the Black Death, along with other horrific ailments that would have easily claimed a life in the Middle Ages. Delve inside the minds of the physicians and barbersurgeons for a better understanding of how they approached healing. As well as diving into the treacherous waters of medieval childbirth, Cummings looks into the birth of hospitals and the care for the insane. We are also taken directly to the battlefield and given the gruesome details of medieval warfare and its repercussions. Examine the horrors of the torture chamber and execution as a means of justice. Medicine in the Middle Ages is a fascinating walk through time to give us a better understanding of such a perilous part of history.

Medieval Medicine

Medieval Medicine

Author: James J. Walsh

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9783748130857

Category: Medical

Page: 195

View: 933

"Medieval Medicine" is the story of the medical sciences in the Middle Ages. The Middle Ages are usually assumed to begin with the deposition of Romulus Augustulus, 476, and end with the fall of Constantinople, 1453. In this little volume, then, we have to outline the history of human efforts to prevent and treat the ills of mankind for nearly one thousand years. Until recently, it has been the custom to believe that there was so little of genuine interest in anything like the scientific care of ailing human beings during these centuries, that even a volume of this kind might seem large for the tale of it. Now we know how much these men of the Middle Ages, for so long called the "Dark Ages," were interested in every phase of human progress. They created a great art and literature, and above all a magnificent architecture. We have been cultivating the knowledge of these for several generations, and it would indeed be a surprise to find that the men who made such surpassing achievements in all the other lines of human effort should have failed only in medicine. As a matter of fact, we have found that the history of medicine and surgery, and of the medical education of the Middle Ages, are quite as interesting as all the other phases of their accomplishments. Hence the compression that has been necessary to bring a purview of all that we know with regard to medieval medicine within the compass of a brief book of this kind. The treatment has been necessarily fragmentary, and yet it is hoped that the details which are given here may prove suggestive for those who have sufficient interest in the subject to wish to follow it, and may provide an incentive for others to learn more of this magnificent chapter of the work of the medieval physicians.

Medicine and the Law in the Middle Ages

Medicine and the Law in the Middle Ages

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004269118

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 712

The scholarly collection of Medicine and the Law in the Middle Ages examines connections between doctors, lawyers, laws, regulations, professionalization, administration, literature, hagiography and health from an international perspective.

Medieval Medicine and the Plague

Medieval Medicine and the Plague

Author: Lynne Elliott

Publisher: Crabtree Publishing Company

ISBN: 077871358X

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 36

View: 416

Illustrates how death and incurable disease were considered a common part of medieval life and offers a history of the Black Death, or the plague, which killed millions of people in Europe.

Medicine in the Middle Ages

Medicine in the Middle Ages

Author: Juliana Cummings

Publisher: Pen and Sword History

ISBN: 152677934X

Category:

Page: 192

View: 451

The Middle Ages covers a span of roughly one thousand years, and through that time people were subject to an array of not only deadly diseases but deplorable living conditions. It was a time when cures for sickness were often worse than the illness itself mixed with a population of people who lacked any real understanding of sanitation and cleanliness. Dive in to the history of medieval medicine, and learn how the foundations of healing were built on the knowledge of ancient Greek and Roman philosophers. Understand how your social status would have affected medical care, and how the domination of the Catholic Church was the basis of an abundant amount of fear regarding life and death. We are given an intimate look into the devastating time of the Black Death, along with other horrific ailments that would have easily claimed a life in the Middle Ages. Delve inside the minds of the physicians and barber surgeons for a better understanding of how they approached healing. As well as diving into the treacherous waters of medieval childbirth, Cummings looks into the birth of hospitals and the care for the insane. We are also taken directly to the battlefield and given the gruesome details of medieval warfare and its repercussions. Examine the horrors of the torture chamber and execution as a means of justice. Medicine in the Middle Ages is a fascinating walk through time to give us a better understanding of such a perilous part of history.

Visualizing Medieval Medicine and Natural History, 1200-1550

Visualizing Medieval Medicine and Natural History, 1200-1550

Author: Jean Ann Givens

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 0754652963

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 184

Visualizing Medieval Medicine and Natural History, 1200-1550 addresses fundamental questions about the interplay of visual and verbal communication in medieval medicine, pharmacy, and natural history. Analyzing images in works as diverse as herbals, jewellery, surgery manuals, lay health guides, cinquecento paintings, manuscripts of Pliny's Natural History, and Leonardo's notebooks, the essays ask: What counts as medical illustration in the Middle Ages? What purposes and audiences do these illustrations serve? How do images of natural objects, observed phenomena, and theoretical concepts amplify texts and convey complex cultural attitudes? Why do we regard some of these images as medieval productions while other exactly contemporary images strike us as typically early modern in character?