Martin Mars XPB2M-1 and JRM Flying Boats

Martin Mars XPB2M-1 and JRM Flying Boats

Author: Steve Ginter

Publisher: Specialty Press (MN)

ISBN: 0942612299

Category: History

Page: 74

View: 882

The photos in this edition are black and white. WWII's 4-engine Martin Mars flying boat would be the World's largest aircraft weighing in at over 150,00 pounds until the Spruce Goose came along. Used as a transport, five production aircraft were built and used throughout the Pacific as the Navys heavy hauler into the mid-1950s when they were purchased and converted into fire bombers in Canada and used to this day. The five aircraft were named Philippine Mars, Marianas Mars, Marshall Mars, Hawaii Mars and Carolline Mars.

American Flying Boats and Amphibious Aircraft

American Flying Boats and Amphibious Aircraft

Author: E.R. Johnson

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786457082

Category: Transportation

Page: 384

View: 240

This work is a comprehensive, heavily illustrated history of the many flying boats and amphibious aircraft designed and built in the United States. It is divided into three chronological sections: the early era (1912–1928), the golden era (1928–1945), and the post-war era (1945–present), with historical overviews of each period. Within each section, individual aircraft types are listed in alphabetical order by manufacturer or builder, with historical background, technical specifications, drawings, and one or more photographs. Appendices cover lesser known flying boat and amphibian types as well as various design concepts that never achieved the flying stage.

Kites, Birds & Stuff - Aircraft of the U.S.A. - MARTIN Aircraft.

Kites, Birds & Stuff - Aircraft of the U.S.A. - MARTIN Aircraft.

Author: P.D. Stemp

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9781291940640

Category: Transportation

Page: 152

View: 219

The aviation history of Martin aircraft. From the beginning to their demise, as such. Information on their aircraft through to Martin Marietta and to their amalgamation with Lockheed. Biplanes, monoplanes, seaplanes, piston engines, jet engines, rockets and missiles, plus projects. The whole works ?

R-4360

R-4360

Author: Graham White

Publisher: Specialty Press

ISBN: 9781580071734

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 598

Leaving no stone unturned, this book provides a detailed account of the inner workings of the R-4360. Also covered is the engineäó»s development history, variations, and its military, commercial, and racing applications.

American Military Transport Aircraft Since 1925

American Military Transport Aircraft Since 1925

Author: E.R. Johnson

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786462698

Category: History

Page: 489

View: 890

Without the support of airlift, the modern American military machine would be brought to a standstill. Since World War II--beginning with the Cold War and continuing up to the present day--the U.S. armed forces have come increasingly to rely upon airlift for mobility. The power to rapidly move and thereafter support a military operation--anywhere in the world, at any time--has become a foundational element of American defense policy. This work provides the reader with a comprehensive historical survey--including technical specifications, drawings, and photographs--of each type of fixed-wing aircraft used by U.S. military forces over a nearly 90-year period to carry out the airlift mission.

The Aviation History

The Aviation History

Author: Relly Victoria Petrescu

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9783848266395

Category: Aeronautics

Page: 218

View: 777

According to Aulus Gellius, Archytas, the Ancient Greek philosopher, mathematician, astronomer, statesman, and strategist, was reputed to have designed and built, around 400 BC, the first artificial, self-propelled flying device, a bird-shaped model propelled by a jet of what was probably steam, said to have actually flown some 200 metres. This machine, which its inventor called The Pigeon, may have been suspended on a wire or pivot for its flight. The 9th century Muslim Berber inventor, Abbas Ibn Firnas's glider is considered by John Harding to be the first attempt at heavier-than-air flight in aviation history. In 1010 AD an English monk, Eilmer of Malmesbury purportedly piloted a primitive gliding craft from the tower of Malmesbury Abbey. Eilmer was said to have flown over 200 yards (180 m) before landing, breaking both his legs. He later remarked that the only reason he did not fly further was because he forgot to give it a tail, and he was about to add one when his concerned Abbot forbade him any further experiments. Bartolomeu de Gusmão, Brazil and Portugal, an experimenter with early airship designs. In 1709 demonstrated a small airship model before the Portuguese court, but never succeeded with a full-scale model. Pilâtre de Rozier, Paris, France, first trip by a human in a free-flying balloon (the Montgolfière), built by Joseph-Michel and Jacques-Étienne Montgolfier, . 9 km covered in 25 minutes on October 15, 1783. (see Le Globe below for first unmanned flight, 2 months earlier) Professor Jacques Charles and Les Frères Robert, two French brothers, Anne-Jean and Nicolas-Louis, variously shared three milestones of pioneering flight: Le Globe, the first unmanned hydrogen gas balloon flew on 26 August 1783. On 1 December 1783 La Charlière piloted by Jacques Charles and Nicolas-Louis Robert made the first manned hydrogen balloon flight. In 1951, the Lockheed XFV-1 and the Convair XFY tailsitters were both designed around the Allison YT40 turboprop engine drivin

Quest for Performance

Quest for Performance

Author: Laurence K. Loftin

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105113770197

Category: Aeronautics

Page: 578

View: 478

This provides access to a NASA History Office publication, NASA SP-468, by Laurence K. Loftin, Jr, NASA Scientific and Technical Information Branch, Washington, D.C. 1985. It traces the technical development of the airplane since World War I. It describes significant aircraft that incorporated important technical innovations and served to shape the future course of aeronautical development, as well as aircraft that represented the state of the art of aeronautical technology in a particular time frame or that were very popular and produced in great numbers. Primary emphasis has been placed on aircraft originating in the United States. The discussion is related primarily to aircraft configuration evolution and associated aerodynamic characteristics and, to a lesser extent, to developments in aircraft construction and propulsion. The material is presented in a manner designed to appeal to the nontechnical reader who is interested in the evolution of the airplane, as well as to students of aeronautical engineering or others with an aeronautical background.