Kegan Paul, a Victorian Imprint

Kegan Paul, a Victorian Imprint

Author: Leslie Howsam

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 0802041264

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 270

View: 810

Howsam combines biography and analytic bibliography in her study of the Kegan Paul imprint to reconstruct a biographical and business history of the firm.

Kegan Paul: a Victorian Imprint

Kegan Paul: a Victorian Imprint

Author: Howsam

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113897398X

Category:

Page: 244

View: 316

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Popular Victorian Women Writers

Popular Victorian Women Writers

Author: Kay Boardman

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719064503

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 715

Popular Victorian women writers considers a diverse group of women writers within the Victorian literary marketplace. It looks at authors such as Ellen Wood, Mary Braddon, Rhoda Broughton and Charlotte Yonge as well as less well-known writers including Jessie Fothergill and Eliza Meteyard. Each essay sets the individual author within her biographical and literary context and provides refreshing insights into her work. Together they bring the work of largely unknown authors and new perspectives on known authors to critical and public attention. Accessible and informative, the book is ideal for students of Victorian literature and culture as well as tutors and scholars of the period.

The Organisation of Knowledge in Victorian Britain

The Organisation of Knowledge in Victorian Britain

Author: Martin Daunton

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0197263267

Category: Education

Page: 444

View: 747

This collection of essays explores the questions of what counted as knowledge in Victorian Britain, who defined knowledge and the knowledgeable, by what means and by what criteria. During the Victorian period, the structure of knowledge took on a new and recognizably modern form, and the disciplines we now take for granted took shape. The ways in which knowledge was tested also took on a new form, with the rise of written examinations. New institutions of knowledge were created: museums were important at the start of the period, universities had become prominent by the end. Victorians needed to make sense of the sheer scale of new information, to popularize it, and at the same time to exclude ignorance and error - a role carried out by encyclopaedias and popular publications. By studying the Victorian organization of knowledge in its institutional, social, and intellectual settings, these essays contribute to our wider consideration of the complex and much debated concept of knowledge.

The Rise and Fall of the Victorian Three-Volume Novel

The Rise and Fall of the Victorian Three-Volume Novel

Author: Troy J. Bassett

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030319267

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 565

Utilizing recent developments in book history and digital humanities, this book offers a cultural, economic, and literary history of the Victorian three-volume novel, the prestige format for the British novel during much of the nineteenth century. With the publication of Walter Scott’s popular novels in the 1820s, the three-volume novel became the standard format for new fiction aimed at middle-class audiences through the support of circulating libraries. Following a quantitative analysis examining who wrote and published these novels, the book investigates the success of publisher Richard Bentley in producing three-volume novels, the experiences of the W. H. Smith circulating library in distributing them, the difficulties of authors such as Robert Louis Stevenson and George Moore in writing them, and the resistance of new publishers such as Arrowsmith and Unwin to publishing them. Rather than faltering, the three-volume novel stubbornly endured until its abandonment in the 1890s.

Karl Pearson

Karl Pearson

Author: Theodore M. Porter

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400835706

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 869

Karl Pearson, founder of modern statistics, came to this field by way of passionate early studies of philosophy and cultural history as well as ether physics and graphical geometry. His faith in science grew out of a deeply moral quest, reflected also in his socialism and his efforts to find a new basis for relations between men and women. This biography recounts Pearson's extraordinary intellectual adventure and sheds new light on the inner life of science. Theodore Porter's intensely personal portrait of Pearson extends from religious crisis and sexual tensions to metaphysical and even mathematical anxieties. Pearson sought to reconcile reason with enthusiasm and to achieve the impersonal perspective of science without sacrificing complex individuality. Even as he longed to experience nature directly and intimately, he identified science with renunciation and positivistic detachment. Porter finds a turning point in Pearson's career, where his humanistic interests gave way to statistical ones, in his Grammar of Science (1892), in which he attempted to establish scientific method as the moral educational basis for a refashioned culture. In this original and engaging book, a leading historian of modern science investigates the interior experience of one man's scientific life while placing it in a rich tapestry of social, political, and intellectual movements.

The British Jesus, 1850-1970

The British Jesus, 1850-1970

Author: Meredith Veldman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000565959

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 788

The British Jesus focuses on the Jesus of the religious culture dominant in Britain from the 1850s through the 1950s, the popular Christian culture shared by not only church, kirk, and chapel goers, but also the growing numbers of Britons who rarely or only episodically entered a house of worship. An essay in intellectual as well as cultural history, this book illumines the interplay between and among British New Testament scholarship, institutional Christianity, and the wider Protestant culture. The scholars who mapped and led the uniquely British quest for the historical Jesus in the first half of the twentieth century were active participants in efforts to replace the popular image of “Jesus in a white nightie” with a stronger figure, and so, they hoped, to preserve Britain’s Christian identity. They failed. By exploring that failure, and more broadly, by examining the relations and exchanges between popular, artistic, and scholarly portrayals of Jesus, this book highlights the continuity and the conservatism of Britain’s popular Christianity through a century of religious and cultural transformation. Exploring depictions of Jesus from over more than one hundred years, this book is a crucial resource for scholars of British Christianity in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Julia Margaret Cameron’s ‘fancy subjects’

Julia Margaret Cameron’s ‘fancy subjects’

Author: Jeffrey Rosen

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781784997908

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 872

Nominated for the William MB Berger Prize for British Art History 2017. The Victorians admired Julia Margaret Cameron for her evocative photographic portraits of eminent men like Tennyson, Carlyle and Darwin. However, Cameron also made numerous photographs that she called 'Fancy subjects', depicting scenes from literature, personifications from classical mythology, and Biblical parables from the Old and New Testament. This book is the first comprehensive study of these works, examining Cameron's use of historical allegories and popular iconography to embed moral, intellectual and political narratives in her photographs. A work of cultural history as much as art history, this book examines cartoons from Punch and line drawings from the Illustrated London News, cabinet photographs and autotype prints, textiles and wall paper, book illustrations and lithographs from period folios, all as a way to contextualise the allegorical subjects that Cameron represented, revealing connections between her 'Fancy subjects' and popular debates about such topics as Biblical interpretation, democratic government and colonial expansion.

Victorian Jesus

Victorian Jesus

Author: Ian Hesketh

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442645776

Category: Anonymous writings, English

Page: 289

View: 973

Cover -- Copyright -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- Prologue-The Forgotten Story of Ecce Homo -- Chapter One-Authority and Authorship -- Chapter Two-By the Author of Essays on the Church -- Chapter Three-Father and Son -- Chapter Four-The Victorian Jesus -- Chapter Five-A Dangerous Book -- Chapter Six-Vomited from the Jaws of Hell -- Chapter Seven-A Sheep in Wolf's Clothing -- Chapter Eight-Shrewd Conjecture -- Chapter Nine-White Lies -- Chapter Ten-Behold the Man -- Chapter Eleven-Behold the Historian -- Chapter Twelve-Fulfilling a Promise -- Chapter Thirteen-By the Author of Ecce Homo -- Chapter Fourteen-Remembering the Author of Ecce Homo -- Epilogue-Anonymous Publishing and Universal History -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- Studies in Book and Print Culture

Edinburgh Companion to Anthony Trollope

Edinburgh Companion to Anthony Trollope

Author: Van Dam Frederik Van Dam

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9781474424424

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 408

View: 640

Explores the many ways in which Anthony Trollope is being read in the twenty-first centurySince the turn of the century, the Victorian novelist Anthony Trollope has become a central figure in the critical understanding of Victorian literature. By bringing together leading Victorianists with a wide range of interests, this innovative collection of essays involves the reader in new approaches to Trollope's work. The contributors to this volume highlight dimensions that have hitherto received only scant attention and in doing so they aim to draw on the aesthetic capabilities of Trollope's twenty-first-century readers. Instead of reading Trollope's novels as manifestations of social theory, they aim to foster an engagement with a far more broadly theorised literary culture.Key Features:The most innovative collection of original essays on Anthony Trollope to dateEnables the reader to see the direction of Trollope studies and Victorian studies in the twenty-first centurySituates Trollope's work in newly emerging critical contexts, such as media networks and economicsMakes use of pioneering developments in stylistics, ethics, epistemology, and reception history