Judaism, Race, and Ethics

Judaism, Race, and Ethics

Author: Jonathan K. Crane

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271086699

Category: Social Science

Page: 186

View: 122

Recent political and social developments in the United States reveal a deep misunderstanding of race and religion. From the highest echelons of power to the most obscure corners of society, color and conviction are continually twisted, often deliberately for nefarious reasons, or misconstrued to stymie meaningful conversation. This timely book wrestles with the contentious, dynamic, and ethically complicated relationship between race and religion through the lens of Judaism. Featuring essays by lifelong participants in discussions about race, religion, and society— including Susannah Heschel, Sander L. Gilman, and George Yancy—this vibrant book aims to generate a compelling conversation vitally relevant to both the academy and the community. Starting from the premise that understanding prejudice and oppression requires multifaceted critical reflection and a willingness to acknowledge one’s own bias, the contributors to this volume present surprising arguments that disentangle fictions, factions, and facts. The topics they explore include the role of Jews and Jewish ethics in the civil rights movement, race and the construction of American Jewish identity, rituals of commemoration celebrating Jewish and black American resilience, the “Yiddish gaze” on lynchings of black bodies, and the portrayal of racism as a mental illness from nineteenth-century Vienna to twenty-first-century Charlottesville. Each essay is linked to a classic Jewish source and accompanied by guiding questions that help the reader identify salient themes connecting ancient and contemporary concerns. In addition to the editor, the contributors include Sander L. Gilman, Annalise E. Glauz-Todrank, Aaron S. Gross, Susannah Heschel, Sarah Imhoff, Willa M. Johnson, Judith W. Kay, Jessica Kirzane, Nichole Renée Phillips, and George Yancy.

Judaism, Race, and Ethics

Judaism, Race, and Ethics

Author: Jonathan K. Crane

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271086712

Category: Social Science

Page: 305

View: 109

Recent political and social developments in the United States reveal a deep misunderstanding of race and religion. From the highest echelons of power to the most obscure corners of society, color and conviction are continually twisted, often deliberately for nefarious reasons, or misconstrued to stymie meaningful conversation. This timely book wrestles with the contentious, dynamic, and ethically complicated relationship between race and religion through the lens of Judaism. Featuring essays by lifelong participants in discussions about race, religion, and society— including Susannah Heschel, Sander L. Gilman, and George Yancy—this vibrant book aims to generate a compelling conversation vitally relevant to both the academy and the community. Starting from the premise that understanding prejudice and oppression requires multifaceted critical reflection and a willingness to acknowledge one’s own bias, the contributors to this volume present surprising arguments that disentangle fictions, factions, and facts. The topics they explore include the role of Jews and Jewish ethics in the civil rights movement, race and the construction of American Jewish identity, rituals of commemoration celebrating Jewish and black American resilience, the “Yiddish gaze” on lynchings of black bodies, and the portrayal of racism as a mental illness from nineteenth-century Vienna to twenty-first-century Charlottesville. Each essay is linked to a classic Jewish source and accompanied by guiding questions that help the reader identify salient themes connecting ancient and contemporary concerns. In addition to the editor, the contributors include Sander L. Gilman, Annalise E. Glauz-Todrank, Aaron S. Gross, Susannah Heschel, Sarah Imhoff, Willa M. Johnson, Judith W. Kay, Jessica Kirzane, Nichole Renée Phillips, and George Yancy.

Religion and the Creation of Race and Ethnicity

Religion and the Creation of Race and Ethnicity

Author: Craig R. Prentiss

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814768822

Category: Religion

Page: 243

View: 405

Religion and the Creation of Race and Ethnicity is the first collection devoted to demonstrating the role that religion and myth have played in the creation of the categories of “race” and “ethnicity.” When scholars approach religion and race, they tend to focus on such issues as how African Americans have expressed Christianity, or how Japanese or Mexicans have lived “religiously.” This volume, meant specifically for those new to the field, brings together an ensemble of prominent scholars and illuminates instead the role religious myths have played in shaping those very social boundaries that we call “races” and “ethnicities.” It asks, what part did Christianity play in creating “Blackness”? To what extent was Japanese or Mexican identity itself the product of religious life? The text, comprised of all original material, introduces readers to the social construction of race and ethnicity and the ways in which these concepts are shaped by religious narratives. It offers examples from both the U.S. and around the world, exploring these themes in the context of places as diverse as Bosnia, India, Japan, Mexico, Zimbabwe, and the Middle East. The volume helps make the case that any account of the social construction of race and ethnicity will be incomplete if it fails to consider the influence of religious traditions and myths. Contributors include: Eddie S. Glaude, Jr., Joel Martin, Jacob Neusner, Roberto S. Goizueta, Laurie Patton, and Michael A. Sells.

Ethics and Race

Ethics and Race

Author: Naomi Zack

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781538166734

Category: Philosophy

Page: 275

View: 520

Ethics and Race introduces historical and contemporary conceptions of race through ideas and events and provides an ethical foundation for students to critically engage these issues in the classroom and in their lives. The book features short chapters of jargon-free writing with discussion questions and a glossary.

Minoritized Women Reading Race and Ethnicity

Minoritized Women Reading Race and Ethnicity

Author: Jin Young Choi

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781498591591

Category: Religion

Page: 166

View: 285

Nonwhite women primarily appear as marginalized voices, if at all, in volumes that address constructions of race/ethnicity and early Christian texts. Employing an intersectional approach, the contributors analyze historical, cultural, literary, and ideological constructions of racial/ethnic identities, which intersect with gender/sexuality class, religion, slavery, and/or power. Given their small numbers in academic biblical studies, this book represents a critical mass of nonwhite women scholars and offers a critique of dominant knowledge production. Filling a significant epistemological gap, this seminal text provides provocative, innovative, and critical insights into constructions of race/ethnicity in ancient and modern texts and contexts.

Ethnic Negotiations

Ethnic Negotiations

Author: Eric D. Barreto

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 316150609X

Category: Religion

Page: 248

View: 537

.".. slightly revised version of a doctoral dissertation ... Emory University on April 12, 2010" p. [v].

The Convergence of Race, Ethnicity, and Gender

The Convergence of Race, Ethnicity, and Gender

Author: Tracy Robinson-Wood

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 9781506305776

Category: Education

Page: 636

View: 151

Students, beginning and seasoned mental health professionals will be better prepared for diversity practice by this accessible, timely, provocative, and critical work, The Convergence of Race, Ethnicity and Gender: Multiple Identities in Counseling, Fifth Edition. Author Tracy Robinson-Wood demonstrates, through both the time honored tradition of storytelling and clinically-focused case studies, the process of patient and therapist transformation. This insightful, practical resource offers behavioral health professionals a nuanced view of diversity beyond race, culture, and ethnicity to include and interrogate intersectionality among race, culture, gender, sexuality, age, class, nationality, religion, and disability. With a keen focus on quality patient care, this important text aims to help professionals better serve patients across sources of diversity. Readers will recognize their roles and responsibilities as social justice agents of change, while identifying the ways in which dominant cultural beliefs and values furnish and perpetuate clients’ feelings of stuckness and inadequacy, in both the therapeutic alliance and within the larger society. This remarkable text reveres the lifelong commitment of using knowledge and skills as power for good to make a meaningful difference in people's lives.

The Oxford Handbook of Jewish Ethics and Morality

The Oxford Handbook of Jewish Ethics and Morality

Author: Elliot N. Dorff

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190608385

Category: Religion

Page: 539

View: 741

For thousands of years the Jewish tradition has been a source of moral guidance, for Jews and non-Jews alike. As the essays in this volume show, the theologians and practitioners of Judaism have a long history of wrestling with moral questions, responding to them in an open, argumentative mode that reveals the strengths and weaknesses of all sides of a question. The Jewish tradition also offers guidance for moral conduct by individuals, communities, and countries and shows how to motivate people to do the good and right thing. The Oxford Handbook of Jewish Ethics and Morality is a collection of original essays addressing these topics--historical and contemporary, as well as philosophical and practical--by leading scholars from around the world. The first section of the volume describes the history of the Jewish tradition's moral thought, from the Bible to contemporary Jewish approaches. The second part includes chapters on specific fields in ethics, including the ethics of medicine, business, sex, speech, politics, war, and the environment.

New York Jews and the Decline of Urban Ethnicity, 1950-1970

New York Jews and the Decline of Urban Ethnicity, 1950-1970

Author: Eli Lederhendler

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 0815607113

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 658

The first book-length study of Jewish culture and ethnicity in New York City after World War II. Here is an intriguing look at the cause and effect of New York City politics and culture in the 1950s and 1960s and the inner life of one of the city's largest ethnic religious groups. The New York Jewish mystique has always been tied to the , fabric and fortunes of the city, as has the community's social aspirations, political inclinations, and its very notion of "Jewishness" itself. All this, points out Eli Lederhendler, came into question as the life of the city changed. Insightfully and meticulously he explores the decline of secular Jewish ethnic culture, the growth of Jewish religious factions, and the rise of a more assertive ethnocentrism. Using memoirs, essays, news items, and data on suburbanization, religion, and race relations, the book analyzes the decline of the metropolis in the 1960s, increasing clashes between Jews and African Americans. and postwar transiency of neighborhood-based ethnic awareness.

Understanding Religious Ethics

Understanding Religious Ethics

Author: Charles Mathewes

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444323429

Category: Religion

Page: 280

View: 348

This accessible introduction to religious ethics focuses on the major forms of moral reasoning encompassing the three ‘Abrahamic’ religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Draws on a range of moral issues, such as examples arising from friendship, marriage, homosexuality, lying, forgiveness and its limits, the death penalty, the environment, warfare, and the meaning of work, career, and vocation Looks at both ethical reasoning and importantly, how that reasoning reveals insights into a religious tradition Investigates the resources available to address common problems confronting Abrahamic faiths, and how each faith explains and defends its moral viewpoints Offering concrete topics for interfaith discussions, this is a timely and insightful introduction to a fast-growing field of interest

Codes of Conduct

Codes of Conduct

Author: Karla F. C. Holloway

Publisher:

ISBN: 0813521556

Category: Social Science

Page: 225

View: 156

A cultural criticism based on literature, public life, contemporary and historical events, aesthetic expression, and popular culture considers dynamics of race and ethnicity as determined by the powerful, and relates cultural issues to the visual power of the black and female body. UP.