How to Talk to Your Kids about Your Divorce

How to Talk to Your Kids about Your Divorce

Author: Samantha Rodman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781440588792

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 272

View: 533

Expert advice for discussing divorce with your children Written by Dr. Samantha Rodman, founder of DrPsychMom.com, How to Talk to Your Kids about Your Divorce teaches you how to raise a happy, thriving family in a changing environment. Each page offers expert advice for discussing your decision in healthy and effective ways, including breaking the initial news, fostering an open dialogue, and ensuring that your children's emotional needs are met throughout your separation. With Dr. Rodman's proven communication techniques, you will: Initiate honest conversations where your children can express their thoughts Discuss divorce-related topics and answer questions in age-appropriate ways Validate your children's feelings, making them feel acknowledged and secure Strengthen and deepen your relationship with your kids Whether you're raising toddlers, school-aged children, or young adults, How to Talk to Your Kids About Your Divorce will help your kids feel heard, valued, and loved during this difficult time.

How to Talk to Your Kids about Separation

How to Talk to Your Kids about Separation

Author: Scott Docherty

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1512212490

Category:

Page: 120

View: 581

what have people have said about this book? Sue Atkins, ITV 'This Morning' Parenting Expert: "Scott's book is bursting with practical, down to earth advice and I particularly liked all of the super ideas & games to help children of all ages deal with separation anxiety. It is written in a conversational friendly tone free of jargon and is enormously practical, with advice on mediation & the legal process...If you are going through a separation or a divorce I highly recommend you pick up a copy of How To Talk To Your Kids About Separation to help you navigate the choppy waters with more confidence." Christopher Mills, psychotherapist, author of The Complete Guide to Divorced Parenting: "There's a revolution going on among family law professionals regarding separation and how to deal with it. Scott Docherty's important new book for separating parents perfectly captures the tone of that revolution, placing him at the forefront of its new influential voices...I have no doubt this timely and readable book will help many separating parents or their children. It holds out hope not just for a fruitful post-separation dialogue, but also warmly and even humorously shows us the nuts-and-bolts of how to achieve this." who is scott? Scott is a lawyer and specialist in family mediation. He works every day with separating couples looking to resolve their issues together on their own terms instead of face to face in court. He champions the use of mediation and other techniques to resolve your separation disputes, encouraging you to take control of your own future and that of your kids by looking at your new life more from their eyes. what's in this book? The book sets out practical tips and techniques to help you talk to your kids about your separation, from how to approach that difficult first chat where the news is broken to them, to dealing with the aftermath and some of the questions you might face from them. The book lays out a common sense approach to keeping your kids informed whilst minimising the effects they might experience as time goes on, and lets you in on some easy methods to handle any separation anxiety in your kids. It spells out in plain and simple language how mediation can help you sort out any separation disputes about your kids, and ends with a useful resources section designed to help the conversation flow between you and your kids. what's that about language? As a lawyer, Scott acknowledges in the book how artificial lawyerly language can be in a time of conflict. Without dumbing things down he avoids commonly unhelpful legal terms that get in the way of a real understanding of what your kids will need during this difficult time in their lives. So the book is written in the natural language he hears every day from parents rather than in the words lawyers tend to force on them and which, disturbingly, can end up being repeated by your kids. so how will this book help you? As Scott says in the book, this is just a little nudge in the right direction, something to help you guide your kids through what could be a pretty traumatic time for them, with or without help from their other parent. He appreciates that you're going through a great deal yourself right now, and that it'll be hard to focus so much on protecting and continuing to inspire your kids as they grow up with separated parents. But he encourages you to believe in your own capacity as a responsible parent, and with the practical guidance he lays out in the book, gives you some of the tools you can use to make your kids' lives a little easier.

We Need To Talk - Tough Conversations With Your Kids

We Need To Talk - Tough Conversations With Your Kids

Author: Richard Heyman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781440520891

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 224

View: 930

Sex. Drugs. Divorce. When it's time for "the talk," many parents panic. They need a simple guide to help them - and now they have it. In this book, parenting expert Dr. Richard Heyman teaches parents how to approach kids with honesty and understanding. He answers questions like "How do I bring it up?", "What should I say?", and "How will he/she/they react?" It features practical and precise advice for specific problem topics and realistic scripts that help dictate what should and should not be said. Complete with realistic sample scripts, this go-to guide helps parents tackle tough topics with conviction and composure.

The Truth About Children and Divorce

The Truth About Children and Divorce

Author: Robert E. Emery Ph.D.

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101157015

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 336

View: 744

Nationally recognized expert Robert Emery applies his twenty-five years of experience as a researcher, therapist, and mediator to offer parents a new road map to divorce. Dr. Emery shows how our powerful emotions and the way we handle them shape how we divorce—and whether our children suffer or thrive in the long run. His message is hopeful, yet realistic—divorce is invariably painful, but parents can help promote their children’s resilience. With compassion and authority, Dr. Emery explains: • Why it is so hard to really make divorce work • How anger and fighting can keep people from really separating • Why legal matters should be one of the last tasks • Why parental love—and limit setting—can be the best “therapy” for kids • How to talk to children, create workable parenting schedules, and more

Nolo's Essential Guide to Divorce

Nolo's Essential Guide to Divorce

Author: Emily Doskow

Publisher: Nolo

ISBN: 9781413329773

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 528

View: 876

If you are going to choose only one book to read as you navigate your divorce, choose Nolo’s Essential Guide to Divorce—the one guide that everyone going through divorce should have. The book will support readers in avoiding conflict while protecting their financial situation and relationships with children. It is thorough, easy to read, and updated with the most current information.

Leading Psychoeducational Groups for Children and Adolescents

Leading Psychoeducational Groups for Children and Adolescents

Author: Janice L. DeLucia-Waack

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9781452237510

Category: Psychology

Page: 345

View: 641

This book provides readers with direction on how to organize psychoeducational groups while also helping them enhance skills for effectively leading such groups—all in one comprehensive volume! Offering an applied, pragmatic approach, author Janice L. DeLucia-Waack uniquely integrates research and practice to suggest valuable leadership strategies while addressing special issues such as children of divorce, anger management, bullying behaviors, and much more.

The Divorce Helpbook for Kids

The Divorce Helpbook for Kids

Author: Cynthia MacGregor

Publisher: Impact Publishers

ISBN: 1886230390

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 133

View: 192

A guide to dealing with the divorce of parents, discussing various reasons for divorce, the emotions experienced by the children, and ways of coping with the change.

Kids and Divorce

Kids and Divorce

Author: Steven T. Griggs, Ph.D.

Publisher: Steven T. Griggs, Ph.D., A Psychological Corporation

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 31

View: 906

I have been a practicing psychologist in an outpatient setting for over thirty-two years. I run into the same issues and problems almost every day (addictions, anxiety, ADHD/learning disabilities, assertiveness, children’s behaviors, mood disorders, relationships and self-esteem). This article is another about children; in this case what they experience after their parents separate and/or divorce. Here's some particulars... This ebook discusses what not to do after the divorce, or put more positively, what to do to help your child(ren) cope and process this very big life-changing event. It focuses on both the parent and child’s experiences. However, since I am a child psychologist, it presents information to parents from the child's point of view, highlighting what children need and want when their parents are no longer together. Here's some specifics... I start with a summary of some of the more common research findings. I don't get too technical or scholarly, but it is important to put my information into context. Next is a description of how children see divorce. (Most parents "get" more of their own experience, not the childs.') While it occasionally does occur, it is very rare that kids want their parents to divorce. Kids have very bad feelings during this and subsequent times. What are these feelings and how can parents help? Here is a discussion of the seven things kids want, and the five feelings they need to have. Next is a discussion of what parents might consider before the divorce. Some parents do a very good job of thinking about what to do before telling the kids. Here you will find the top ten things to do first... What are the ways to "reach" kids? I go over specific communication techniques, especially the ones that work the best. What about rewards, bribes, manipulation? Parents usually resort to some version of these, often out of desperation. I write about how to avoid much of that. These are covered under "Vocabulary of Feelings," the "Four-To-One Rule," and the "Three Contingencies of Reinforcement." Parents have to know about "acting out." They have to understand what acting out expresses. What does it mean? What is the child doing by behaving this way? This is where the Vocabulary of Feelings earns high marks. It opens up communication in productive, not destructive ways. What are the most common feelings children have during this time? I list seven. Sometimes, kids are really thrown for a loop by divorce, no matter how sensitive the parents are. Worse, sometimes kids fall apart, which is more common when parents declare war on each other. I list the top ten major warning signs of childhood decompensation. If you see any of these signs, take your child to a licensed professional. What are the three most destructive things a child believes about the divorce? Parents have to correct these right away, or else... What is the one finding from dozens of studies that almost single handedly explains why there is such harm children suffer before, during and after the divorce? Parents should know about Constancy. This is one of the most powerful psychological priniciples that parents overlook. Without it, kids are lost. What is the most crucial time to attend to this?. There is one developmental time frame that requires special attention. If the divorce occurs during this two year window, the child is five times more likely to develop a depressive and/or an anxiety disorder in the teen years. How should parents handle "visitation?" This is such a strange word to kids, especially in the beginning, just after the divorce. What's the aftermath of children having to go back and forth between parents? What might parents do about pre-visit and exit "jitters?" What about resistance? Then I introduce some techniques--things to do or say that make much of this manageable. Believe it or not, parents can succeed in all the above areas, even while living in separate households. It's not ideal, but children can salvage much that is meaningful, but only if the parents are skilled. This brings up co-parenting. Have you and your "ex" considered what rules each of you will have pertaining to the child? How about rewards for good behaviors? It's important for the contingencies to be at least similar between the houses. What about changes? Usually, parents develop a schedule of visitation. But things change, often at the last minute. Now what? Parents have to work together at least a little bit to pull this off. I provide lots of tips. What are the seven deadly sins committed by warring parents during visitation? These are huge "no-no's" if you want your child to have any peace of mind at all. What do parents need to know if and when there arrives a stepparent? Thought things were challenging just after the divorce? Just wait... And, how do the children address the new "parent?" Blended families foil many an attempt to re-stabilize households. But there are four simple solutions (mind sets) that help if the parent is open. And, what do parents do with their own feelings? Usually we act them out on our "ex." This is understandable, but it is damaging to both parents and children. What if the "ex's" hate each other so much that they will not even send email to each other? This is disastrous and probably requires intervention. I discuss when and what types will be most helpful. Parents need to know what constitutes the best adult behaviors in conjunction with what the children are feeling. If this fails, it probably is appropriate for the parents to start their own counseling. I tell you when. Lastly, two things are included that are not often discussed in this context. One is the death of a parent and the sequela experienced by the remaining family members. The other is the divorced parent's self-care, which is usually diminished. I list the ten areas separated and/or divorced parents should not overlook. These are the subjects I cover in this ebook. This ebook has 31 pages and contains THE information parents have to have to save their kids from psychological harm. Clients are very enthusiastic about this ebook, probably because there are not many to-the-point references to be found on this subject. Half the population has experienced divorce, and unfortunately, a high number of divorcing couples have children. There is a great need here. This ebook has no fat. Think of it as a "Cliffs Notes" publication. It's a quick read (about an hour), because I go straight to the points and explain concepts in everyday language, just like what you're reading now.

Helping Those Who Hurt

Helping Those Who Hurt

Author: Barbara Roberts

Publisher: Tyndale House

ISBN: 9781617472510

Category: Religion

Page: 144

View: 647

Whether you’re a layperson or a professional counselor, Helping Those Who Hurt will help you care for others encountering life crises such as: Illness, hospitalization, and death A troubled marriage Addiction Suicide

How to Help Your Child Cope With Your Divorce

How to Help Your Child Cope With Your Divorce

Author: Noelle Angelica S.

Publisher: Hyperink Inc

ISBN: 9781614647478

Category:

Page: 26

View: 875

ABOUT THE BOOK We can blame it on the media or on societal pressure exerted on women with unplanned pregnancies. We can lament the decline in society's moral fiber, or we can complain about the ever increasing strain that economic and social problems exert on families. We can point a finger to whichever factor we want, but nothing changes the fact that the breakup of marriages is quite a common occurrence. In fact, according to international statistics, the United States, for example, has consistently had a divorce to marriage rate of nearly 50% over the past decade. We don't need a study or survey to tell us about the state of many marriages, though. Chances are, you know several people who are divorced, as well as families for whom unsuccessful marriages seem to be a legacy passed down from generation to generation. Therese*, 52 years old and a mother of two, felt as though she had been cursed. (*Names have been changed to protect the interviewees' privacy.) "My grandparents were separated. My dad left my mom when I was in middle school, and this was really hard for me to accept. And then again I watched in terror as the marriages of my brothers and sisters started falling apart," she remembers. She was determined to break the cycle in her own family. "I tried to hold on even though I was extremely unhappy. Eventually, I just couldn't do it anymore, even if I didn't want my kids to experience what I had gone through," she explains. EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK In addition to emotional fatigue or even volatility, many parents also have to contend with the fact that they simply do not know how to help their children. Most parents may have all of the good intentions in the world, but this does not necessarily translate into action. Of course, another thing that we will have to take into consideration is the existence of other factors that may have brought about the conflict between the two parents, or may be aggravating the existent situation. For instance, if there is violence involved, whether physical or verbal, the situation certainly becomes more difficult than it would otherwise be, and may require the intervention of mediators or other professionals. Economic factors can also come into play and make circumstances more complicated for parents who are trying to get through this tough period with their children. For example, a separation may mean that the parent who usually supports the family will no longer be present and will therefore require the other parent to exert more effort to make ends meet, despite arrangements for child support. This can then cause a domino effect of putting the parties involved on edge and make it even more stressful for everyone, especially the children... Buy a copy to keep reading! CHAPTER OUTLINE How to Help Your Child Cope With Your Divorce + Introduction + Parenting Through the Struggle: The Challenge + Common Mistakes to Avoid + Helping Your Child Thrive + ...and much more