Galen's Epistemology

Galen's Epistemology

Author: R. J. Hankinson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316513484

Category: Medical

Page: 335

View: 948

Explores Galen's contributions to (mainly scientific) epistemology and their legacy in the Islamic world.

Galen's Method of Healing

Galen's Method of Healing

Author: Richard Durling

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004377141

Category: History

Page: 215

View: 661

This book includes papers presented in Kiel in 1982 on Galen's chief therapeutic manual, the Methodus medendi . The papers describe the composition of the book, its surgical content, its emphasis on logic, and its fortuna in medieval Islam and Renaissance Europe. No such study in depth of a major Galenic work has hitherto been attempted.

Epistemology

Epistemology

Author: Stephen Everson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521349699

Category: Philosophy

Page: 308

View: 830

A broad range of epistemological views, from the extreme relativism of Protagoras to the skepticism of the Pyrrhonists, is explored in critical essays that span sixth century B.C. to the second and third centuries A.D.

Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Volume 47

Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Volume 47

Author: Brad Inwood

Publisher: Oxford Studies in Ancient Phil

ISBN: 9780198722717

Category: History

Page: 317

View: 116

Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy is a volume of original articles on all aspects of ancient philosophy. The articles may be of substantial length, and include critical notices of major books. OSAP is now published twice yearly, in both hardback and paperback. 'The serial Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy (OSAP) is fairly regarded as the leading venue for publication in ancient philosophy. It is where one looks to find the state-of-the-art. That the serial, which presents itself more as an anthology than as a journal, has traditionally allowed space for lengthier studies, has tended only to add to its prestige; it is as if OSAP thus declares that, since it allows as much space as the merits of the subject require, it can be more entirely devoted to the best and most serious scholarship.' Michael Pakaluk, Bryn Mawr Classical Review

Galen and the Early Moderns

Galen and the Early Moderns

Author: Emanuela Scribano

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030863081

Category: Electronic books

Page: 218

View: 903

This book explores the presence of Galen of Pergamon (129 c. 216 AD) in early modern philosophy, science, and medicine. After a short revival due to the humanistic rediscovery of his works, the influence of the great ancient physician on Western thought seemed to decline rapidly as new discoveries made his anatomy, physiology, and therapeutics more and more obsolete. In fact, even though Galenism was gradually dismissed as a system, several of his ideas spread through the modern world and left their mark on natural philosophy, rational theology, teleology, physiology, biology, botany, and the philosophy of medicine. Without Galen, none of these modern disciplines would have been the same. Linking Renaissance with the Enlightenment, the eleven chapters of this book offer a unique and detailed survey of both scientific and philosophical Galenisms from the sixteenth to the late eighteenth century. Figures discussed include Julius Caesar Scaliger, Giambattista Da Monte, Hyeronimus Fabricius ab Aquapendente, Andrea Cesalpino, Thomas Browne, Kenelm Digby, Henry More, Ralph Cudworth, Robert Boyle, John Locke, Guillaume Lamy, Jean-Baptiste Verduc, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Christian Wolff, Julien Offray de La Mettrie, Denis Diderot, and Kurt Sprengel.

Knowledge and the Scholarly Medical Traditions

Knowledge and the Scholarly Medical Traditions

Author: Don Bates

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521499755

Category: Medical

Page: 388

View: 387

However much the three great traditions of medicine - Galenic, Chinese and Ayurvedic - differed from each other, they had one thing in common: scholarship. The foundational knowledge of each could only be acquired by careful study under teachers relying on ancient texts. Such medical knowledge is special, operating as it does in the realm of the most fundamental human experiences - health, disease, suffering, birth and death - and the credibility of healers is of crucial importance. Because of this, scholarly medical knowledge offers a rich field for the study of different cultural practices in the legitimation of knowledge generally. The contributors to this volume are all specialists in the history or anthropology of these traditions, and their essays range from historical investigations to studies of present-day practices.

Galen and the World of Knowledge

Galen and the World of Knowledge

Author: Christopher Gill

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139482844

Category: Philosophy

Page:

View: 487

Galen is the most important medical writer in Graeco-Roman antiquity, and also extremely valuable for understanding Graeco-Roman thought and society in the second century AD. This volume of essays locates him firmly in the intellectual life of his period, and thus aims to make better sense of the medical and philosophical 'world of knowledge' that he tries to create. How did Galen present himself as a reader and an author in comparison with other intellectuals of his day? Above all, how did he fashion himself as a medical practitioner, and how does that self-fashioning relate to the performance culture of second-century Rome? Did he see medicine as taking over some of the traditional roles of philosophy? These and other questions are freshly addressed by leading international experts on Galen and the intellectual life of the period, in a stimulating collection that combines learning with accessibility.

The Cambridge Companion to Galen

The Cambridge Companion to Galen

Author: R. J. Hankinson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139826913

Category: Philosophy

Page:

View: 402

Galen of Pergamum (AD 129–c.216) was the most influential doctor of later antiquity, whose work was to influence medical theory and practice for more than fifteen hundred years. He was a prolific writer on anatomy, physiology, diagnosis and prognosis, pulse-doctrine, pharmacology, therapeutics, and the theory of medicine; but he also wrote extensively on philosophical topics, making original contributions to logic and the philosophy of science, and outlining a scientific epistemology which married a deep respect for empirical adequacy with a commitment to rigorous rational exposition and demonstration. He was also a vigorous polemicist, deeply involved in the doctrinal disputes among the medical schools of his day. This volume offers an introduction to and overview of Galen's achievement in all these fields, while seeking also to evaluate that achievement in the light of the advances made in Galen scholarship over the past thirty years.

Galen on Pharmacology

Galen on Pharmacology

Author: Armelle Debru

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004377431

Category: History

Page: 349

View: 442

The 14 papers of this book represent the first attempt to explore systematically Galen's major contribution in the complex area of ancient pharmacology.

Galen: On Antecedent Causes

Galen: On Antecedent Causes

Author: Klaudios Galenos

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521622506

Category: Philosophy

Page: 372

View: 464

A new edition of Galen's text on causal theory, and the first translation of it into a modern language.

The Path to Post-Galilean Epistemology

The Path to Post-Galilean Epistemology

Author: Danilo Capecchi

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319583105

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 533

View: 342

This book casts new light on the process that in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries led to a profound transformation in the study of nature with the emergence of mechanistic philosophy, the new mixed mathematics, and the establishment of the experimental approach. It is argued that modern European science originated from Hellenistic mathematics not so much because of rediscovery of the latter but rather because its “applied” components, namely mechanics, optics, harmonics, and astronomy, and their methodologies continued to be transmitted throughout the Middle Ages without serious interruption. Furthermore, it is proposed that these “applied” components played a role in their entirety; thus, for example, “new” mechanics derived not only from “old” mechanics but also from harmonics, optics, and astronomy. Unlike other texts on the subject, the role of mathematicians is stressed over that of philosophers of nature and the focus is particularly on epistemological aspects. In exploring Galilean and post-Galilean epistemology, attention is paid to the contributions of Galileo’s disciples and also the impact of his enemies. The book will appeal to both historians of science and scientists.

Empiricisms

Empiricisms

Author: Barry Allen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780197508954

Category: Philosophy

Page: 464

View: 270

In this sweeping volume of comparative philosophy and intellectual history, Barry Allen reassesses the values of experience and experiment in European and world traditions. His work traces the history of empirical philosophy from its birth in Greek medicine to its emergence as a philosophy of modern science. He surveys medical empiricism, Aristotlean and Epicurean empiricism, the empiricism of Gassendi and Locke, logical empiricism, radical empiricism, transcendental empiricism, and varieties of anti-empiricism from Parmenides to Wilfrid Sellars. Throughout this extensive intellectual history, Allen builds an argument in three parts. A richly detailed account of history's empiricisms in Part One establishes a context in Part Two for reconsidering the work of the radical empiricists--William James, Henri Bergson, John Dewey, and Gilles Deleuze, each treated in a dedicated chapter. What is "radical" about them is their effort to return empiricism from epistemology to the ontology and natural philosophy where it began. In Part Three, Allen sets empirical philosophy in conversation with Chinese tradition, considering technological, scientific, medical, and alchemical sources, as well as selected Confucian, Daoist, and Mohist classics. The work shows how philosophical reflection on experience and a profound experimental practice coexist in traditional China with no interaction or even awareness of each other, slipping over each other instead of intertwining as they did in European history, a difference Allen attributes to a different understanding of the value of knowledge. Allen's book recovers empiricism's neglected, multi-textured contexts, and elucidates the enduring value of experience, to arrive at an idea of what is living and dead in philosophical empiricism.