Fall River Outrage

Fall River Outrage

Author: David Richard Kasserman

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812200888

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 608

Fall River Outrage recounts one of the most sensational and widely reported murder cases in early nineteenth-century America. When, in 1832, a pregnant mill worker was found hanged, the investigation implicated a prominent Methodist minister. Fearing adverse publicity, both the industrialists of Fall River and the New England Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church engaged in energetic campaigns to obtain a favorable verdict. It was also one of the earliest attempts by American lawyers to prove their client innocent by assassinating the moral character of the female victim. Fall River Outrage provides insight in American social, legal, and labor history as well as women's studies.

The New Measures

The New Measures

Author: Ted A. Smith

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521871310

Category: History

Page: 359

View: 460

This 2007 book debates about religion and democracy through a cultural history of nineteenth-century revival practice.

Reading the American Novel 1780 - 1865

Reading the American Novel 1780 - 1865

Author: Shirley Samuels

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118786314

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 549

Reading the American Novel 1780-1865 provides valuable insights into the evolution and diversity of fictional genres produced in the United States from the late 18th century until the Civil War, and helps introductory students to interpret and understand the fiction from this popular period. Offers an overview of early fictional genres and introduces ways to interpret them today Features in depth examinations of specific novels Explores the social and historical contexts of the time to help the readers’ understanding of the stories Explores questions of identity - about the novel, its 19th-century readers, and the emerging structure of the United States - as an important backdrop to understanding American fiction Profiles the major authors, including Louisa May Alcott, Charles Brockden Brown, James Fenimore Cooper, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, alongside less familiar writers such as Fanny Fern, Caroline Kirkland, George Lippard, Catharine Sedgwick, and E. D. E. N. Southworth Selected by Choice as a 2013 Outstanding Academic Title

Methodism

Methodism

Author: David Hempton

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300106145

Category: Religion

Page: 294

View: 952

Hempton explores the rise of Methodism from its unpromising origins as a religious society within the Church of England in the 1730s to a major international religious movement by the 1880s.

Working Women, Literary Ladies

Working Women, Literary Ladies

Author: Sylvia J. Cook

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195327810

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 601

This book explores the simultaneous entry of working-class women in the United States into wage-earning factory labor and into opportunities for mental and literary development. It traces the hopes and tensions generated by expectations of their gender and class from the first New England operatives in the early nineteenth century to immigrant sweatshop workers in the early twentieth.

Dangerous to Know

Dangerous to Know

Author: Susan Branson

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812201420

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 987

In 1823, the History of the Celebrated Mrs. Ann Carson rattled Philadelphia society and became one of the most scandalous, and eagerly read, memoirs of the age. This tale of a woman who tried to rescue her lover from the gallows and attempted to kidnap the governor of Pennsylvania tantalized its audience with illicit love, betrayal, and murder. Carson's ghostwriter, Mary Clarke, was no less daring. Clarke pursued dangerous associations and wrote scandalous exposés based on her own and others' experiences. She immersed herself in the world of criminals and disreputable actors, using her acquaintance with this demimonde to shape a career as a sensationalist writer. In Dangerous to Know, Susan Branson follows the fascinating lives of Ann Carson and Mary Clarke, offering an engaging study of gender and class in the early nineteenth century. According to Branson, episodes in both women's lives illustrate their struggles within a society that constrained women's activities and ambitions. She argues that both women simultaneously tried to conform to and manipulate the dominant sexual, economic, and social ideologies of the time. In their own lives and through their writing, the pair challenged conventions prescribed by these ideologies to further their own ends and redefine what was possible for women in early American public life.

Without Benefit of Clergy

Without Benefit of Clergy

Author: Karin E. Gedge

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190284749

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 119

The common view of the nineteenth-century pastoral relationship--found in both contemporary popular accounts and 20th-century scholarship--was that women and clergymen formed a natural alliance and enjoyed a particular influence over each other. In Without Benefit of Clergy, Karin Gedge tests this thesis by examining the pastoral relationship from the perspective of the minister, the female parishioner, and the larger culture. The question that troubled religious women seeking counsel, says Gedge, was: would their minister respect them, help them, honor them? Surprisingly, she finds, the answer was frequently negative. Gedge supports her conclusion with evidence from a wide range of previously untapped primary sources including pastoral manuals, seminary students' and pastors' journals, women's diaries and letters, pamphlets, sentimental and sensational novels, and The Scarlet Letter.

Wicked Conduct

Wicked Conduct

Author: Rory Raven

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781614234838

Category: True Crime

Page: 141

View: 810

The mentalist, mindbinder, and author of Haunted Providence delves into the 19th-century murder of Sarah Maria Cornell. “If I should be missing, enquire of the Rev. Mr. Avery of Bristol, he will know where I am.” This scribbled note belonged to Sarah M. Cornell, written the day her body was found hanged in a rural pasture in Tiverton, Rhode Island. An unmarried young woman of limited means, Sarah was four months pregnant, and a married Methodist minister stood accused as the father. Local authorities grew skeptical of Sarah’s apparent suicide as Reverend Avery’s conduct appeared increasingly suspect, and eventually the extensive evidence of their tortured relationship set off a groundswell of public interest and media attention never before seen in 1830s New England. This tragic crime left the nation clamoring for justice and became one of early America’s most sensational murder trials.

Edinburgh Companion to Nineteenth-Century American Letters and Letter-Writing

Edinburgh Companion to Nineteenth-Century American Letters and Letter-Writing

Author: Celeste-Marie Bernier

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748692934

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 752

View: 790

Provides a wide-ranging entry point and intervention into scholarship on nineteenth-century American letter-writingThis comprehensive study by leading scholars in an important new field-the history of letters and letter writing-is essential reading for anyone interested in nineteenth-century American politics, history or literature. Because of its mass literacy, population mobility, and extensive postal system, nineteenth-century America is a crucial site for the exploration of letters and their meanings, whether they be written by presidents and statesmen, scientists and philosophers, novelists and poets, feminists and reformers, immigrants, Native Americans, or African Americans. This book breaks new ground by mapping the voluminous correspondence of these figures and other important American writers and thinkers. Rather than treating the letter as a spontaneous private document, the contributors understand it as a self-conscious artefact, circulating between friends and strangers and across multiple genres in ways that both make and break social ties.Key FeaturesDraws together different emphases on the intellectual, literary and social uses of letter writing Provides students and researchers with a means to situate letters in their wider theoretical and historical contextsMethodologically expansive, intellectually interrogative chapters based on original research by leading academicsOffers new insights into the lives and careers of Louisa May Alcott, Charles Brockden Brown, Emily Dickinson, Frederick Douglass, Margaret Fuller, Henry James, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Edgar Allan Poe, among many others

American Folk Songs: A Regional Encyclopedia [2 volumes]

American Folk Songs: A Regional Encyclopedia [2 volumes]

Author: Norman Cohen

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9780313088100

Category: Music

Page: 680

View: 397

This state-by-state collection of folksongs describes the history, society, culture, and events characteristic of all fifty states. Unlike all other state folksong collections, this one does not focus on songs collected in the particular states, but rather on songs concerning the life and times of the people of that state. The topics range from the major historical events, such as the Boston Tea Party, the attack on Fort Sumter, and the California Gold Rush, to regionally important events such as disasters and murders, labor problems, occupational songs, ethnic conflicts. Some of the songs will be widely recognized, such as Casey Jones, Marching Through Georgia, or Sweet Betsy from Pike. Others, less familiar, have not been reprinted since their original publication, but deserve to be studied because of what they tell about the people of these United States, their loves, labors, and losses, and their responses to events. The collection is organized by regions, starting with New England and ending with the states bordering the Pacific Ocean, and by states within each region. For each state there are from four to fifteen songs presented, with an average of 10 songs per state. For each song, a full text is reprented, followed by discussion of the song in its historical context. References to available recordings and other versions are given. Folksongs, such as those discussed here, are an important tool for historians and cultural historians because they sample experiences of the past at a different level from that of contemporary newspaper accounts and academic histories. These songs, in a sense, are history writ small. Includes: Away Down East, The Old Granite State, Connecticut, The Virginian Maid's Lament, Carry Me Back to Old Virginny, I'm Going Back to North Carolina, Shut up in Cold Creek Mine, Ain't God Good to Iowa?, Dakota Land, Dear Prairie Home, Cheyenne Boys, I'm off for California, and others.

New England

New England

Author: Joseph E. Coduri

Publisher: Hanover, NH : University Press of New England

ISBN: STANFORD:36105024598588

Category: History

Page: 808

View: 106