England and the Avignon Popes

England and the Avignon Popes

Author: Karsten Pluger

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351195652

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 190

"Much has been written about the complex relationship between England and the papacy in the 14th century, yet the form (rather than the content) of the diplomatic intercourse between these two protagonists has not hitherto been examined in detail. Drawing on a wide range of unpublished sources, Pluger explores the techniques of communication employed by the Crown in its dealings with Clement VI (1342-52) and Innocent VI (1352-62). Methodologies of social and cultural history and of International Relations are brought to bear on the analysis of the dialogue between Westminster and Avignon, resulting in a more complete picture of 14th-century Anglo-papal relations in particular and of medieval diplomatic practice in general."

Avignon of the Popes

Avignon of the Popes

Author: Edwin Mullins

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105123318128

Category: Avignon (France)

Page: 254

View: 558

At the beginning of the fourteenth century anarchy in Italy led to the capital of the Christian world being moved from Rome for the first and only time in history. It was a critical moment, and it resulted in seven successive popes remaining in exile for the next seventy years. The city chosen to replace Rome was Avignon. And depending on where you stood at the time they were seventy years of heaven, or of hellopinions invariably ran to extremes, as did the behaviour of the popes themselves. It was during this period of exile that the city witnessed some of the most turbulent events in the history of Christendom, among them the suppression of the Knights Templar and the last of the heretical Cathars, the first onslaught of the Black Death, the final collapse of the crusading dream, and the first decades of the Hundred Years War between England and France, in which successive Avignon popes attempted to mediate.

Avignon and Its Papacy, 1309–1417

Avignon and Its Papacy, 1309–1417

Author: Joëlle Rollo-Koster

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442215344

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 411

With the arrival of Clement V in 1309, seven popes ruled the Western Church from Avignon until 1378. Joëlle Rollo-Koster traces the compelling story of the transplanted papacy in Avignon, the city the popes transformed into their capital. Through an engaging blend of political and social history, she argues that we should think more positively about the Avignon papacy, with its effective governance, intellectual creativity, and dynamism. It is a remarkable tale of an institution growing and defending its prerogatives, of people both high and low who produced and served its needs, and of the city they built together. As the author reconsiders the Avignon papacy (1309–1378) and the Great Western Schism (1378–1417) within the social setting of late medieval Avignon, she also recovers the city’s urban texture, the stamp of its streets, the noise of its crowds and celebrations, and its people’s joys and pains. Each chapter focuses on the popes, their rules, the crises they faced, and their administration but also on the history of the city, considering the recent historiography to link the life of the administration with that of the city and its people. The story of Avignon and its inhabitants is crucial for our understanding of the institutional history of the papacy in the later Middle Ages. The author argues that the Avignon papacy and the Schism encouraged fundamental institutional changes in the governance of early modern Europe—effective centralization linked to fiscal policy, efficient bureaucratic governance, court society (société de cour), and conciliarism. This fascinating history of a misunderstood era will bring to life what it was like to live in the fourteenth-century capital of Christianity.

The Papacy, Scotland and Northern England, 1342-1378

The Papacy, Scotland and Northern England, 1342-1378

Author: A. D. M. Barrell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052144182X

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 238

This is the first analysis of the full breadth of papal involvement in late medieval Britain, using local sources in conjunction with material from the Vatican Archives. It deals with the Avignon Papacy's relations with Scotland and northern England during a period in which papal involvement at the local level was unusually wide-ranging, but still was generally accepted. It examines how papal practices affected both clerics and lay people in northern Britain, the nature and importance of any opposition aroused, and how far the popes and their agents had to adapt to local circumstances.

Clement VI

Clement VI

Author: Diana Wood

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521894115

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 539

Which of the two sides of Clement prevailed the 'official' or the personal? The book attempts to answer this question by examining his ideas and actions in connection with some of the major issues of the reign: for example, his attempts to solve the problem of the 'usurping' emperor, Louis of Bavaria, through the appointment of Charles of Bohemia (Charles IV); to deal with a crisis in the Hundred Years War between France and England; to check Islamic expansion and to heal the Greek Schism; to curb the oligarchic challenge of those who thought that the papacy should be at Rome rather than at Avignon. Clement was a great orator and the book is based partly on his sermons, many of which are unpublished. It is the only study of an Avignon pope in English.

Term Paper Resource Guide to Medieval History

Term Paper Resource Guide to Medieval History

Author: Jean S. Hamm

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9780313359675

Category: History

Page: 371

View: 258

Help students get the most out of studying medieval history with this comprehensive and practical research guide to topics and resources. * Covers 100 significant events across four continents, between 410 C.E. and 1485 C.E. * Offers an easy-to-use chronological organization that facilitates research and saves time for students, faculty, and librarians * Includes an annotated bibliography of primary source materials for each topic

Anglo-Papal Relations in the Early Fourteenth Century

Anglo-Papal Relations in the Early Fourteenth Century

Author: Barbara Bombi

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191045349

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 119

This volume is concerned with diplomacy between England and the papal curia during the first phase of the Anglo-French conflict known as the Hundred Years' War (1305-1360). On the one hand, Barbara Bombi compares how the practice of diplomacy, conducted through both official and unofficial diplomatic communications, developed in England and at the papal curia alongside the formation of bureaucratic systems. On the other hand, she questions how the Anglo-French conflict and political change during the reigns of Edward II and Edward III impacted on the growth of diplomatic services both in England and the papal curia. Through the careful examination of archival and manuscript sources preserved in English, French, and Italian archives, this book argues that the practice of diplomacy in fourteenth-century Europe nurtured the formation of a "shared language of diplomacy". The latter emerged from the need to "translate" different traditions thanks to the adaptation of house-styles, formularies, and ceremonial practices as well as through the contribution of intermediaries and diplomatic agents acquainted with different diplomatic and legal traditions. This argument is mostly demonstrated in the second part of the book, where the author examines four relevant case studies: the papacy's move to France after the election of Pope Clement V (1305) and the succession of Edward II to the English throne (1307); Anglo-papal relations between the war of St Sardos (1324) and the deposition of Edward II in 1327; the outbreak of the Hundred Years' Wars in 1337; and lastly the conclusion of the first phase of the war, which was marked in 1360 by the agreement between England and France known as the Treaty of Brétigny-Calais.

Pope Benedict XII (1334-1342)

Pope Benedict XII (1334-1342)

Author: Irene Bueno

Publisher: Amsterdam University Press

ISBN: 9789048538140

Category: History

Page: 302

View: 687

This book offers a unique overview on the career and work on Benedict XII, the third pope of Avignon. Benedict XII (ca. 1334-1342) was a key figure of the Avignon papal court, renowned for rooting out heretics and distinguishing himself as a refined theologian. During his reign, he faced the most significant religious and political challenges in the era of the Avignon papacy: theological quarrels, divisions and schisms within the Church, conflicts between European sovereigns, and the growth of Turkish power in the East. In spite of its diminished political influence, the papacy, which had recently moved to France, emerged as an institution committed to the defense and expansion of the Catholic faith in Europe and the East. Benedict made significant contributions to the definition of doctrine, the assessment of pontifical power in Western Europe, and the expansion of Catholicism in the East: in all these different contexts he distinguished himself as a true guardian of orthodoxy.

The Popes and Britain

The Popes and Britain

Author: Stella Fletcher

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781786731562

Category: Religion

Page: 264

View: 882

When the British thought of themselves as a Protestant nation their natural enemy was the pope and they adapted their view of history accordingly. In contrast, Rome's perspective was always considerably wider and its view of Britain was almost invariably positive, especially in comparison to medieval emperors, who made and unmade popes, and post-medieval Frenchmen, who treated popes with contempt. As the twenty-first-century papacy looks ever more firmly beyond Europe, this new history examines political, diplomatic and cultural relations between the popes and Britain from their vague origins, through papal overlordship of England, the Reformation and the process of repairing that breach.

The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England

The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England

Author: Ian Mortimer

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439112908

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 812

The past is a foreign country: this is your guidebook. Take a step back into Ian Mortimer's guide and experience the middle ages like never before.