Encyclopedia of Evangelicalism

Encyclopedia of Evangelicalism

Author: Randall Herbert Balmer

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

ISBN: 0664224091

Category: Religion

Page: 674

View: 753

The Encyclopedia of Evangelicalism is the most comprehensive resource about evangelicalism available. With nearly 3,000 separate entries, the Encyclopedia of Evangelicalism covers historical and contemporary theologians, preachers, laity, cultural figures, musicians, televangelists, movements, organizations, denominations, folkways, theological terms, events, and more. Students, scholars, and libraries will all benefit from it.

The Other Evangelicals

The Other Evangelicals

Author: Isaac B. Sharp

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9781467464093

Category: Religion

Page: 433

View: 905

What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you hear “evangelical”? For many, the answer is “white,” “patriarchal,” “conservative,” or “fundamentalist”—but as Isaac B. Sharp reveals, the “big tent” of evangelicalism has historically been much bigger than we’ve been led to believe. In The Other Evangelicals, Sharp brings to light the stories of those twentieth-century evangelicals who didn’t fit the mold, including Black, feminist, progressive, and gay Christians. Though the binary of fundamentalist evangelicals and modernist mainline Protestants is taken for granted today, Sharp demonstrates that fundamentalists and modernists battled over the title of “evangelical” in post–World War II America. In fact, many ideologies characteristic of evangelicalism today, such as “biblical womanhood” and political conservatism, arose only in reaction to the popularity of evangelical feminism and progressivism. Eventually, history was written by the “winners”—the Billy Grahams of American religion—while the “losers” were expelled from the movement via the establishment of institutions such as the National Association of Evangelicals. Carefully researched and deftly written, The Other Evangelicals offers a breath of fresh air for scholars seeking a more inclusive history of religion in America.

American Evangelicalism

American Evangelicalism

Author: Darren Dochuk

Publisher: University of Notre Dame Pess

ISBN: 9780268158552

Category: History

Page: 536

View: 833

No living scholar has shaped the study of American religious history more profoundly than George M. Marsden. His work spans U.S. intellectual, cultural, and religious history from the seventeenth through the twenty-first centuries. This collection of essays uses the career of George M. Marsden and the remarkable breadth of his scholarship to measure current trends in the historical study of American evangelical Protestantism and to encourage fresh scholarly investigation of this faith tradition as it has developed between the eighteenth century and the present. Moving through five sections, each centered around one of Marsden’s major books and the time period it represents, the volume explores different methodologies and approaches to the history of evangelicalism and American religion. Besides assessing Marsden’s illustrious works on their own terms, this collection’s contributors isolate several key themes as deserving of fresh, rigorous, and extensive examination. Through their close investigation of these particular themes, they expand the range of characters and communities, issues and ideas, and contingencies that can and should be accounted for in our historical texts. Marsden’s timeless scholarship thus serves as a launchpad for new directions in our rendering of the American religious past.

Evangelical America: An Encyclopedia of Contemporary American Religious Culture

Evangelical America: An Encyclopedia of Contemporary American Religious Culture

Author: Timothy J. Demy Ph.D.

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781610697743

Category: Religion

Page: 515

View: 433

An essential new reference work for students and general readers interested in the history, dynamics, and influence of evangelicalism in recent American history, politics, and culture. • Provides readers with an understanding of contemporary American evangelicalism's history, key individuals, organizations, and beliefs through detailed coverage of more than 180 topics • Documents the diversity of the Evangelical movement under a common core umbrella of doctrinal beliefs • Displays the breadth of American evangelical interaction in social and cultural issues and in debates in recent American history

Evangelical News

Evangelical News

Author: Anja-Maria Bassimir

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817321246

Category: Religion

Page: 384

View: 737

"This work is an innovative treatise on the evangelical magazine market during the 1970s and 1980s and how it sustained religious community and ideology. Bassimir argues that community can be produced in discourse, especially when shared rhetoric, concepts, and perspectives signal belonging. The 1970s and 1980s were a tumultuous period in United States history. In suit with a dramatic political shift to the right, evangelicalism also entered the public discourse as a distinct religious movement and was immediately besieged by cultural appropriations and internal fragmentations. This was also a time when Americans in general and evangelicals in particular grappled with issues and ideas such as feminism and legal abortion, restructuring traditional roles for women and the family. The Watergate Crisis and the newly emerging Christian Right also threw politics into turmoil. During this time, there was a surge of readership for evangelical magazines such as Christian Today, Moody Monthly, Eternity, and Post-Americans/Sojourners. While each of these magazines-and many other publications-contributes to and participates in the overall dissemination of evangelical ideology, they all also have their own outlooks and political leanings when it comes to hot-button issues. Evangelical Visions, through a thoroughly researched lens, makes important correctives to common understandings of evangelical discourse, particularly regarding the key political initiatives of the religious right. Bassimir demonstrates that within the pages of these periodicals, evangelicals hashed out a number of competing views on feminism, abortion, reproductive technologies, and political involvement itself. To accomplish this, Evangelical Visions traces the emergence of evangelical social and political awareness in the 1970s to the height of its power as a political program. The chapters in this monograph also delve into such topics as how evangelicals re-envisioned gender norms and relations in light of the feminist movement and the use of childhood as a symbol of unspoiled innocence and the pure potential of humanity. Presently, most accounts of evangelicalism cite evangelical magazines only very selectively, and virtually no studies make substantive use of those magazines as objects of investigation. Bassimir's Evangelical Visions makes a much needed contribution to our understanding of evangelicalism in the late twentieth century by providing a nuanced picture of a religious subculture that is too often reduced to caricature. This study is located at the intersection of history, religious studies, and media studies and will appeal to scholars and students of all of these fields"--

Evangelical Gotham

Evangelical Gotham

Author: Kyle B. Roberts

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226388144

Category: History

Page: 349

View: 414

Kyle Roberts explores the role of evangelical religion in the making of antebellum New York City and its spiritual marketplace. Between the American Revolution and the War of 1812a period of rebuilding after seven years of British occupationevangelicals emphasized individual conversion and rapidly expanded the number of their congregations. Then, up to the Panic of 1837, evangelicals shifted their focus from their own salvation to that of their neighbors, through the use of domestic missions, Seamen s Bethels, tract publishing, free churches, and abolitionism. Finally, in the decades before the Civil War, the city s dramatic expansion overwhelmed evangelicals, whose target audiences shifted, building priorities changed, and approaches to neighborhood and ethnicity evolved. By that time, though, evangelicals and the city had already shaped each other in profound ways, with New York becoming a national center of evangelicalism."

Evangelical Christian Executives

Evangelical Christian Executives

Author: Lewis D. Solomon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351322904

Category: Religion

Page: 177

View: 839

"[In Evangelical Christian Executives,] Dr. Solomon has captured the essence of an effective and refreshingly different approach to business. In telling the compelling stories of six Christian CEOs, he shows us an alternative to an ethic of greed that has so tarnished corporate America." --John D. Beckett, CEO and Chairman of R.W. Beckett Corp. Events of recent years have encouraged a high degree of skepticism and doubt about business institutions and markets. In the face of widespread cynicism about corporate credibility, business leaders are seeking to restore the trust and confidence not only of investors, but of employees, customers, suppliers, shareholders, potential investors, and the public-at-large. In this volume, Lewis D. Solomon focuses on evangelical Christians who have founded or come to lead six firms. He explores whether religion offers a constructive way to think about corporate governance and the tensions between profitability and social responsibility. Solomon finds that many Christian executives have a private faith, leading quietly by example. Others want their faith to shine forth. Solomon focuses on this latter group, dividing them into two categories. The first group he identifies as preachers, who weave visible demonstrations of their faith into the fabric of their businesses. The second are those who take a more sophisticated approach, based on two biblical principles: stewardship and/or servant-leadership. In addition to examining how these leaders of faith have successfully brought their religious values into their businesses, he assesses the consequences of incorporating their faith and values into their business organizations, considering profitability, employee and customer satisfaction, legal and environmental compliance, and charitable giving. Together with these leadership styles and results, Solomon presents three business models--constant, transformational, and evolving--that enable readers to gain a further understanding of the six companies. While Solomon shows that it is possible to integrate financial profitability and broader religious goals, he finds that it is difficult, though not impossible, to maintain a biblically based leadership style after a firm goes public or expands. With the growth of evangelical Christianity in many sectors of American public life, this volume will be of broad interest to business executives, sociologists, students of religion, and economists. Lewis D. Solomon is Theodore Rinehart Professor of Business Law at the George Washington University Law School, where he has taught corporate and tax law for over twenty-five years. A prolific author on legal, business, public policy, and religious topics, he has written over fifty books and numerous articles. He is an ordained rabbi and interfaith minister.

Jesus as Torah in John 1–12

Jesus as Torah in John 1–12

Author: Dan Lioy

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781498275880

Category: Religion

Page: 318

View: 721

In this study of John 1-12, the author develops the thesis that Jesus is the divine, incarnate Torah, and that Jesus as Torah is the conceptual center of the Fourth Gospel. An overarching goal of the treatise is to explore the Evangelist's portrait of Jesus as the fulfillment of the Mosaic law. Connected with this aim is the central thesis that the Messiah appears in the Gospel of John as the realization of all the law's redemptive-historical types, prophecies, and expectations. A corresponding major claim is that those who trust in Jesus for eternal life and heed his teaching satisfy fully the requirements of the moral law recorded in Scripture. An examination of John 1-12 substantiates the truth that Jesus is the perfection of the gift of the Tanakh. He existed in the beginning with the Father and Spirit as God. The eternal Torah is light and life, fulfillment and joy, in fellowship with the triune God for all eternity. The divine Tanakh, by becoming incarnate, revealed the glory of the Father and made the fullness of God's grace and truth available to humankind. The living Word not only provides salvation but in so doing unveils the loving and redeeming heart of the Father for all to see. The Son of God is the one to whom all the Old Testament luminaries--such as Abraham, Jacob, Moses, and Isaiah--pointed, and in whom their eschatological hopes were realized. The Anointed One is greater than and supreme over all the religious institutions once associated with the Jerusalem tabernacle and temple. Even such Jewish festivals as the Feast of Tabernacles, Pentecost, Dedication, and Passover find their fulfillment in the Messiah. This volume is appropriate for personal study and is also suitable as a college and seminary text.

Global Evangelicalism

Global Evangelicalism

Author: Donald M. Lewis

Publisher: InterVarsity Press

ISBN: 9780830896622

Category: Religion

Page: 312

View: 416

Front-rank historians of evangelicalism gather in this introduction and overview of the surprising and dynamic global Christian movement known as evangelicalism. Its defining characteristics are discussed, its regional growth and expansion surveyed, its place in globalization weighed and its salient features sampled.

The Jesus People Movement

The Jesus People Movement

Author: Richard A. Bustraan

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781630873509

Category: Religion

Page: 262

View: 799

Who would have imagined that the hippies, those long-haired, psychedelia-influenced youth of the 1960s, would have initiated a spiritual revolution that has transformed American Christianity? If you are unfamiliar with the 1960s, the counterculture, the hippie movement, and the Jesus People, then this book will transport you to that era and introduce you to the generation and the decade that turned American culture upside down. If you have read other books on the Jesus People, this account will take you by surprise. A refreshingly different narrative that unveils a storyline and characters not commonly known to have been associated with the movement, this book argues that the Jesus People, though often trivialized and stigmatized as a group of lost and vulnerable youth who strayed from the Fundamentalism of their childhood, helped American Christianity negotiate a way forward in a post-1960s culture. It examines the narrative of the Holy Spirit and the phenomenon called Pentecostalism. Although utterly central, the Jesus People's Pentecostalism has never been examined and their story has been omitted from the historiography of Pentecostalism. This account uniquely redresses this omission.

Evangelicalism & the Stone-Campbell Movement

Evangelicalism & the Stone-Campbell Movement

Author: William R. Baker

Publisher: InterVarsity Press

ISBN: 0830875107

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 934

The Stone-Campbell Movement, also known as the Restoration Movement, arose on the frontiers of early nineteenth-century America. Like-minded Methodists, Baptists and Presbyterians abandoned denominational labels in order to be "Christians only." They called followers to join in Christian unity and restore the ideals of the New Testament church, holding authoritative no book but the Bible and believing no creed but Christ. Modern-day inheritors of this movement, including the Churches of Christ (a cappella) and the Christian Churches (independent), find much in common with wider evangelical Christianity as a whole. Both groups are committed to the authority of Scripture and the importance of personal conversion. Yet Restorationists and evangelicals, separated by sociological history as well as points of doctrinal emphasis, have been wary of each other. Evangelicals have often misunderstood Restorationists as exclusivist separatists and baptismal regenerationists. On the other hand, Stone-Campbell adherents have been suspicious of mainstream denominational evangelicals as having compromised key aspects of the Christian faith. In recent years Restoration Movement leaders and churches have moved more freely within evangelical circles. As a result, Stone-Campbell scholars have reconsidered their relationship to evangelicalism, pondering to what extent Restorationists can identify themselves as evangelicals. Gathered here are essays by leading Stone-Campbell thinkers, drawing from their Restoration heritage and offering significant contributions to evangelical discussions of the theology of conversion and ecclesiology. Also included are responses from noted evangelicals, who assess how Stone-Campbell thought both corresponds with and diverges from evangelical perspectives. Along with William R. Baker (editor) and Mark Noll (who wrote the Foreword), contributors include Tom Alexander, Jim Baird, Craig L. Blomberg, Jack Cottrell, Everett Ferguson, Stanley J. Grenz, John Mark Hicks, Gary Holloway, H. Wayne House, Robert C. Kurka, Robert Lowery, Edward P. Myers and Jon A. Weatherly. For all concerned with Christian unity and the restoration of the church, Evangelicalism & the Stone-Campbell Movement offers a substantive starting point for dialogue and discussion.