Reading, Publishing and the Formation of Literary Taste in England, 1880-1914

Reading, Publishing and the Formation of Literary Taste in England, 1880-1914

Author: Mary Hammond

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 0754656683

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 234

View: 376

Between 1880 and 1914, England saw the emergence of an unprecedented range of new literary forms, which meant new relationships between books, authors, readers and classifications of taste. Hammond uses previously unexamined archive material and focuses in detail on the working practices of selected publishers and distributors to make an original and important contribution to our understanding of the cultural dynamics and rhetorics of the fin-de-siècle literary field in England.

Writing, Authorship and Photography in British Literary Culture, 1880 - 1920

Writing, Authorship and Photography in British Literary Culture, 1880 - 1920

Author: Emily Ennis

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350196209

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 991

At the turn of the 20th century, printing and photographic technologies evolved rapidly, leading to the birth of mass media and the rise of the amateur photographer. Demonstrating how this development happened symbiotically with great changes in the shape of British literature, Writing, Authorship and Photography in British Literary Culture, 1880-1920 explores this co-evolution, showing that as both writing and photography became tools of mass dissemination, literary writers were forced to re-evaluate their professional and personal identities. Focusing on four key authors-Thomas Hardy, Bram Stoker, Joseph Conrad and Virginia Woolf-each of which had their own private and professional connections to photographs, this book offers valuable historical contexts for contemporary cultural developments and anxieties. At first establishing the authors' response to developing technologies through their non-fiction, personal correspondences and working drafts, Ennis moves on to examine how their perceptions of photography extend into their major works of fiction: A Laodicean, Dracula, The Secret Agent, The Inheritors and The Voyage Out. Reflecting on the first 'graphic revolution' in a world where text and image are now reproduced digitally and circulated en masse and online, Ennis redirects our attention to when image and text appeared alongside each other for the first time and the crises this sparked for authors: how they would respond to increasingly photographic depictions of everyday life, and in turn, how their writing adapted to a distinctly visual mass media.

The Rise of the Office Clerk in Literary Culture, 1880-1939

The Rise of the Office Clerk in Literary Culture, 1880-1939

Author: J. Wild

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230514669

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 211

View: 435

This innovative study investigates the emergence and impact of the lower middle class on British print culture through the figure of the office clerk. This interdisciplinary work offers important insights into a previously neglected area of social and book history, and explores key works by George Gissing, Forster and JB Priestley.

The Professional Literary Agent in Britain, 1880-1920

The Professional Literary Agent in Britain, 1880-1920

Author: Mary Ann Gillies

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9780802091475

Category: History

Page: 265

View: 576

Breaking new ground in the study of British literary culture during an important, transitional period, this new work by Mary Ann Gillies focuses on the professional literary agent whose emergence in Britain around 1880 coincided with, and accelerated, the transformation of both publishing and authorship. Like other recent studies in book and print culture, The Professional Literary Agent in Britain, 1880-1920 starts from the central premise that the business of authorship is inextricably linked with the aesthetics of literary praxis. Rather than provide a broad overview of the period, however, Gillies focuses on a specific figure, the professional literary agent. She then traces the influence of two prominent agents - A. P. Watt (generally acknowledged as the first professional literary agent) and J. B. Pinker (the leading figure in the second wave of agents) - focusing on their respective relationships with two key clients. The case studies not only provide insight into the business dynamics of the literary world at this time, but also illustrate the shifting definition of literature itself during the period.

Transitions in Middlebrow Writing, 1880 - 1930

Transitions in Middlebrow Writing, 1880 - 1930

Author: K. Macdonald

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137486776

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 562

This book examines the connections evident between the simultaneous emergence of British modernism and middlebrow literary culture from 1880 to the 1930s. The essays illustrate the mutual influences of modernist and middlebrow authors, critics, publishers and magazines.

How to Do Things with Books in Victorian Britain

How to Do Things with Books in Victorian Britain

Author: Leah Price

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691159546

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 360

View: 755

How to Do Things with Books in Victorian Britain asks how our culture came to frown on using books for any purpose other than reading. When did the coffee-table book become an object of scorn? Why did law courts forbid witnesses to kiss the Bible? What made Victorian cartoonists mock commuters who hid behind the newspaper, ladies who matched their books' binding to their dress, and servants who reduced newspapers to fish 'n' chips wrap? Shedding new light on novels by Thackeray, Dickens, the Brontës, Trollope, and Collins, as well as the urban sociology of Henry Mayhew, Leah Price also uncovers the lives and afterlives of anonymous religious tracts and household manuals. From knickknacks to wastepaper, books mattered to the Victorians in ways that cannot be explained by their printed content alone. And whether displayed, defaced, exchanged, or discarded, printed matter participated, and still participates, in a range of transactions that stretches far beyond reading. Supplementing close readings with a sensitive reconstruction of how Victorians thought and felt about books, Price offers a new model for integrating literary theory with cultural history. How to Do Things with Books in Victorian Britain reshapes our understanding of the interplay between words and objects in the nineteenth century and beyond.

Art and Commerce in the British Short Story, 1880–1950

Art and Commerce in the British Short Story, 1880–1950

Author: Dean Baldwin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317321934

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 253

View: 555

The short story was a commercial phenomenon which took off in the late nineteenth century and lasted through to the rise of television and film. Baldwin uses a wide variety of sources to show how economic factors helped to dictate how and what a wide variety of authors wrote.

The Sociocultural Functions of Edwardian Book Inscriptions

The Sociocultural Functions of Edwardian Book Inscriptions

Author: Lauren Alex O'Hagan

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000367454

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 312

View: 175

This innovative text draws on theories and methodologies from the fields of multimodality, ethnography, and literacy studies to explore the sociocultural significance of book ownership and book inscriptions in Edwardian Britain. The Sociocultural Functions of Edwardian Book Inscriptions examines evidence gathered from historical records, archival documents, and the inscriptive practices of individuals from the Edwardian era to foreground the social, communicative, and performative functions of inscriptive practices and illustrate how material, lexical, and semiotic means were used to perform identity, contest social status, and forge relationships with others. The text adopts a unique ethnohistorical approach to multimodality, supporting the development of a typography of book inscriptions which will serve as a unique interpretive framework for analysis of literary artifacts in the context of broader sociopolitical forces. This text will benefit doctoral students, researchers, and academics in the fields of literacy studies, English language arts, and research methods in education more broadly. Those interested in British book history, anthropology, and 20th-century literature will also enjoy this volume.

William Morris and the Idea of Community

William Morris and the Idea of Community

Author: Anna Vaninskaya

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748643721

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 116

The great polymath William Morris and his contemporaries and followers--from H. Rider Haggard to H. G. Wells--are the focus of this study. Anna Vaninskaya draws upon a wide array of primary sources: from working-class fiction and articles in fringe socialist newspapers to historical treatises, autobiographies and diaries, in order to explore the many ways Victorians and Edwardians talked about community and modernity. Vaninskaya's narrative moves from the realm of romance bestsellers and sniggering reviews to debates in weighty historical tomes, and then to the headquarters of revolutionary parties, to street-corners and shabby lecture halls. She demonstrates how in each domain the dream of community clashed with the reality of the modern state and market.

The History of the Book in the West: 1914–2000

The History of the Book in the West: 1914–2000

Author: Alexis Weedon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351888165

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 226

This collection brings together published papers on key themes which book historians have identified as of particular significance in the history of twentieth-century publishing. It reprints some of the best comparative perspectives and most insightful and innovatively presented scholarship on publishing and book history from such figures as Philip Altbach, Lewis Coser, James Curran, Elizabeth Long, Laura Miller, Angus Phillips, Janice Radway, Jonathan Rose, Shafquat Towheed, Catherine Turner, Jay Satterfield, Clare Squires, Eva Hemmungs Wirtén. It is arranged into six sections which examine the internationalisation of publishing businesses, changing notions of authorship, innovation in the design and marketing of books, the specific effects of globalisation on creative property and the book in a multimedia marketplace. Twentieth-century book history attracts an audience beyond the traditional disciplines of librarianship, bibliography, history and literary studies. It will appeal to publishing educators, editors, publishers, booksellers, as well as academics with an interest in media and popular culture.

Weird Fiction in Britain 1880–1939

Weird Fiction in Britain 1880–1939

Author: James Machin

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319905273

Category: Social Science

Page: 259

View: 805

This book is the first study of how ‘weird fiction’ emerged from Victorian supernatural literature, abandoning the more conventional Gothic horrors of the past for the contemporary weird tale. It investigates the careers and fiction of a range of the British writers who inspired H. P. Lovecraft, such as Arthur Machen, M. P. Shiel, and John Buchan, to shed light on the tensions between ‘literary’ and ‘genre’ fiction that continue to this day. Weird Fiction in Britain 1880–1939 focuses on the key literary and cultural contexts of weird fiction of the period, including Decadence, paganism, and the occult, and discusses how these later impacted on the seminal American pulp magazine Weird Tales. This ground-breaking book will appeal to scholars of weird, horror and Gothic fiction, genre studies, Decadence, popular fiction, the occult, and Fin-de-Siècle cultural history.