An Immigrant Bishop

An Immigrant Bishop

Author: Patrick W. Carey

Publisher: CUA Press

ISBN: 9780813234595

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 147

An Immigrant Bishop is a revised examination of the Irish intellectual roots of Bishop John England’s American pastoral works in the diocese of Charleston, South Carolina (1820-1842). The text focuses on his political philosophy and his theology of the Church, both of which were influenced by the Enlightenment and a theological, not a political, Gallicanism. As the study demonstrates, we now know more about England’s intellectual life prior to his immigration than we do about any other Catholic immigrant from Ireland. Neither Peter Guilday’s monumental two-volume biography (1927) of England nor any subsequent scholarly study of England has uncovered and analyzed, as this book does, England’s many unpublished and published writings in Ireland—his explicitly authored texts, his published speeches before the Cork Aggregate meetings, and his pseudonymous articles in the Cork Mercantile Chronicle between 1808, when he was ordained, and 1820, when he emigrated to the United States. John England (1786-1842), the first Catholic bishop of Charleston, was the foremost national spokesman for Catholicism in the United States during the years of his episcopacy and the primary apologist for the compatibility of Catholicism and American republicanism. He was also the first Catholic bishop to speak before the United States Congress and the first American to receive a papal appointment as an Apostolic Delegate to a foreign country (in this case to negotiate a concordat with President Jean Pierre Boyer of Haiti). He is considered the father of the Baltimore Provincial Councils and the nineteenth-century American Catholic conciliar tradition. He was also the only bishop in American history to develop a constitutional form of diocesan government and administration. Among other things he was the first cleric to establish a diocesan newspaper that had something of a national distribution. England’s contribution to the early formation of an American Catholicism has been told many times before, but he has the kind of creative mind and episcopal leadership that demands repeated re-considerations.

Los Que Mandan

Los Que Mandan

Author: Jos? Luis de Imaz

Publisher: State University of New York Press

ISBN: 9781438400617

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 201

Analyzes the political process in Argentina.

Bishops on the Border

Bishops on the Border

Author: Mark Adams

Publisher: Church Publishing, Inc.

ISBN: 9780819228758

Category: Religion

Page: 161

View: 899

Two ministers and three bishops representing the Presbyterian Church (USA), the United Methodist Church, the Board of Directors of Catholic Relief Services (CRS), the Episcopal Church, and the ELCA share their "spiritual autobiography" as it relates to their experience working on the Arizona border, the geographic flash point for the immigration debate.

The Rhetorics of US Immigration

The Rhetorics of US Immigration

Author: E. Johanna Hartelius

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271076553

Category: Social Science

Page: 313

View: 682

In the current geopolitical climate—in which unaccompanied children cross the border in record numbers, and debates on the topic swing violently from pole to pole—the subject of immigration demands innovative inquiry. In The Rhetorics of US Immigration, some of the most prominent and prolific scholars in immigration studies come together to discuss the many facets of immigration rhetoric in the United States. The Rhetorics of US Immigration provides readers with an integrated sense of the rhetorical multiplicity circulating among and about immigrants. Whereas extant literature on immigration rhetoric tends to focus on the media, this work extends the conversation to the immigrants themselves, among others. A collection whose own eclecticism highlights the complexity of the issue, The Rhetorics of US Immigration is not only a study in the language of immigration but also a frank discussion of who is doing the talking and what it means for the future. From questions of activism, authority, and citizenship to the influence of Hollywood, the LGBTQ community, and the church, The Rhetorics of US Immigration considers the myriad venues in which the American immigration question emerges—and the interpretive framework suited to account for it. Along with the editor, the contributors are Claudia Anguiano, Karma R. Chávez, Terence Check, Jay P. Childers, J. David Cisneros, Lisa M. Corrigan, D. Robert DeChaine, Anne Teresa Demo, Dina Gavrilos, Emily Ironside, Christine Jasken, Yazmin Lazcano-Pry, Michael Lechuga, and Alessandra B. Von Burg.

What Hath God Wrought

What Hath God Wrought

Author: Daniel Walker Howe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199743797

Category: History

Page: 928

View: 518

The Oxford History of the United States is by far the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. In this Pulitzer prize-winning, critically acclaimed addition to the series, historian Daniel Walker Howe illuminates the period from the battle of New Orleans to the end of the Mexican-American War, an era when the United States expanded to the Pacific and won control over the richest part of the North American continent. A panoramic narrative, What Hath God Wrought portrays revolutionary improvements in transportation and communications that accelerated the extension of the American empire. Railroads, canals, newspapers, and the telegraph dramatically lowered travel times and spurred the spread of information. These innovations prompted the emergence of mass political parties and stimulated America's economic development from an overwhelmingly rural country to a diversified economy in which commerce and industry took their place alongside agriculture. In his story, the author weaves together political and military events with social, economic, and cultural history. Howe examines the rise of Andrew Jackson and his Democratic party, but contends that John Quincy Adams and other Whigs--advocates of public education and economic integration, defenders of the rights of Indians, women, and African-Americans--were the true prophets of America's future. In addition, Howe reveals the power of religion to shape many aspects of American life during this period, including slavery and antislavery, women's rights and other reform movements, politics, education, and literature. Howe's story of American expansion culminates in the bitterly controversial but brilliantly executed war waged against Mexico to gain California and Texas for the United States. Winner of the New-York Historical Society American History Book Prize Finalist, 2007 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction The Oxford History of the United States The Oxford History of the United States is the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. The series includes three Pulitzer Prize winners, a New York Times bestseller, and winners of the Bancroft and Parkman Prizes. The Atlantic Monthly has praised it as "the most distinguished series in American historical scholarship," a series that "synthesizes a generation's worth of historical inquiry and knowledge into one literally state-of-the-art book." Conceived under the general editorship of C. Vann Woodward and Richard Hofstadter, and now under the editorship of David M. Kennedy, this renowned series blends social, political, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military history into coherent and vividly written narrative.

Blood Brotherhood

Blood Brotherhood

Author: Robert Barnard

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 9781447239703

Category: Fiction

Page: 184

View: 474

Old church meets new with a vengeance when a monk is brutally murdered at St. Botolph’s. Murder wasn’t on the agenda for the symposium on the role of the Anglican Church today—until a brother is found dead in his cell. Suddenly the diverse guest list falls under suspicion. Could it be the bishop famous for his television appearances or his exotic counterpart from Africa; one of the three vicars who run the gamut from trendy to traditional; the nondenominational American with a passion for fundraising; or perhaps one of the two Norwegian lady divines? Or is it one of the brothers themselves, taking advantage of the camouflage provided by outside visitors? Surely the tensions between the cloistered clergy and their more worldly visitors can’t have led to such an unthinkable occurrence. But why is Father Anselm, the austere head of the Anglican Community, so reluctant to allow an investigation? Is he concerned simply about unfavourable publicity? Or is there a darker secret hidden behind the inscrutable walls of St. Botolph’s? ‘Robert Barnard . . . writes with irony and wit and considerable skill and grace’ St Louis Post-Dispatch ‘A first-rate suspense story . . . highly original and entertaining.’ Booklist ‘Robert Barnard is the most reliable and versatile practitioner of English mystery-comedy on the present scene. A virtuoso . . .’ New York Times Book Review

Mercy Without Borders

Mercy Without Borders

Author: Mark Zwick

Publisher: Paulist Press

ISBN: 0809146894

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 292

View: 258

After living in El Salvador and witnessing the cost of the political violence and economic hardship there, Mark and Louise Zwick founded Casa Juan Diego. Mercy Without Borders tells the story of the beginnings of the Catholic Worker in Houston, a city that has become a destination for waves of refugees from Mexico and Central America. Over the years, they have received the poor, the weary, and the destitute, seeing only the face of Christ regardless of immigration status. In addition to sharing their stories of Casa Juan Diego and many of its guests, the Zwicks analyze some of the causes of the economic imbalances that result in destitution south of the U.S. border, in countries where people toil in factories for little or nothing, only to see the fruits of their labor shipped to the affluent north.

Other People's Diasporas

Other People's Diasporas

Author: Sinéad Moynihan

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815652120

Category: History

Page: 257

View: 751

With the economic rise of the "Celtic Tiger" in the 1990s, Irish culture was deeply impacted by a concurrent rise in immigration. A nation tending to see itself as a land of emigrants suddenly saw waves of newcomers. In this book, Moynihan takes as her central question a formulation by sociologist Steve Garner: "What happens when other people’s diasporas converge on the homeland of diasporic people?" Approaching the question from a cultural rather than a sociological vantage point, Moynihan delves into fiction, drama, comedy, and cinema since 1998 to examine the various representations of and insights into race relations. "Other People’s Diasporas" draws upon the recent fiction of Joseph O’Connor, Roddy Doyle, and Emma Donoghue; films directed by Jim Sheridan and Eugene Brady; drama by Donal O’Kelly and Ronan Noone; and the comedy of Des Bishop to present a highly original and engaging exploration of contemporary Irish discourses on race.

Nations Unbound

Nations Unbound

Author: Linda Basch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135307035

Category: Social Science

Page: 317

View: 464

Nations Unbound is a pioneering study of an increasing trend in migration-transnationalism. Immigrants are no longer rooted in one location. By building transnational social networks, economic alliances and political ideologies, they are able to cross the geographic and cultural boundaries of both their countries of origin and of settlement. Through ethnographic studies of immigrant populations, the authors demonstrate that transnationalism is something other than expanded nationalism. By placing immigrants in a limbo between settler and visitor, transnationalism challenges the concepts of citizenship and of nationhood itself.

The Lion and the Lamb

The Lion and the Lamb

Author: William M. Shea

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199881536

Category: Religion

Page: 416

View: 345

One of the most intriguing questions in contemporary American Christianity is whether the recent warming of relations between Catholics and conservative evangelicals promises a thaw in the ice age that has lasted since the sixteenth century. American evangelical Protestants and Roman Catholics have hated and suspected one another since colonial times. In the twentieth century, however, each community has experienced radical change, and this has led to a change in the relationship between the two. In this book William Shea examines the history of this troubled relationship and the signs of potential reconciliation. His springboard is the recent publicity given to the 1993 document Evangelicals and Catholics Together, in which several well-known figures from each camp, acting as individuals, signed a statement affirming much more common theological and social ground than any other American Catholic-evangelical group had ever done. Looking back, Shea surveys the long and very bitter history of published recriminations that have flown back and forth between Catholics and many kinds of Protestants since the 16th century. He makes the case that Catholics and conservative Protestants reacted along parallel lines to western "modernity" - especially naturalistic evolution and higher criticism of the Bible). That deeper history leads him to the more recent history that has partially overcome the severe Catholic-evangelical antagonisms. Here he focuses on the rise of "neo-evangelicals" associated with Billy Graham and the National Association of Evangelicals and on the changes with the Catholic church since Vatican II. He goes on to offer systematic interpretations of recent evangelical literature on Catholics and Catholic literature on evangelicals. The book ends with some historical, but also theological, social and personal conclusions. This accessible, groundbreaking, and timely study will be indispensable reading for all interested in the religious landscape of America today.

Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of Citizenship

Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of Citizenship

Author: Rachel Buff

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814799925

Category: History

Page: 456

View: 205

Punctuated by marches across the United States in the spring of 2006, immigrant rights has reemerged as a significant and highly visible political issue. Immigrant Rights in the Shadows of U.S. Citizenship brings prominent activists and scholars together to examine the emergence and significance of the contemporary immigrant rights movement. Contributors place the contemporary immigrant rights movement in historical and comparative contexts by looking at the ways immigrants and their allies have staked claims to rights in the past, and by examining movements based in different communities around the United States. Scholars explain the evolution of immigration policy, and analyze current conflicts around issues of immigrant rights; activists engaged in the current movement document the ways in which coalitions have been built among immigrants from different nations, and between immigrant and native born peoples. The essays examine the ways in which questions of immigrant rights engage broader issues of identity, including gender, race, and sexuality.