The Crisis of the African-American Architect

The Crisis of the African-American Architect

Author: Melvin L. Mitchell

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 9780595243266

Category: Architecture

Page: 417

View: 501

" another missing piece of our rich history and profound contribution to western civilization. For history buffs please put this book on your must read list... " George C. Fraser, Author of Race For Success and Success Runs In Our Race "[Mitchell] believes that the entire future of blacks in the field of architecture is in jeopardy He then discusses the impact of the Harlem Renaissance on black architecture and the subsequent emergence of Howard University as the center of the black architectural universe..." The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education " seminal " Architecture Magazine In this long overdue book, aimed at Black America and her allies, Melvin Mitchell poses the question "why haven't black architects developed a Black Architecture that complements modernist black culture that is rooted in world-class blues, jazz, hip-hop music, and other black aesthetic forms?" His provocative thesis, inspired by Harold Cruse's landmark book, The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual, exposes the roots of an eighty-year-old estrangement between black architects and Black America. Along the way he provides interesting details about the politics of downtown development in the Marion Barry era of Washington, DC. Mitchell calls for a bold and inclusive "New (Black) Urbanism." He sees the radical reform and "re-missioning" of the handful of accredited HBCU based architecture schools as a critical tool in refashioning a rapprochement between black architects and Black America.

American Architecture

American Architecture

Author: Leland M. Roth

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780813350073

Category: Architecture

Page: 1126

View: 490

This widely acclaimed, highly illustrated introduction to the history of American architecture is now fully revised throughout. American Architecture introduces readers to the major developments that shaped the American-built environment from the first Americans to the present, from the everyday vernacular to the high style of aspiration. Significant updates include: A new chapter on the 21st century, detailing the green architecture movement and LEED status architecture, the influence of CAD design on recent architecture, the necessity of sustainable design, the globalization of architecture and international architects, and some of the preservation issues facing architecture today. An expanded section on Native American architecture including contemporary design by Native American architects, expanded discussions on architectural education and training, more examples of women architects and designers, and a thoroughly expanded glossary to help today's readers. A revised and expanded art program, including over 640 black and white images, and a new 32-page, full-color insert featuring over 60 new color images. American Architecture describes the impact of changes in conceptual imagery, style, building technology, landscape design, vernacular construction, and town-planning theory throughout U.S. history. Eleven chronologically organized chapters chart the social, cultural, and political forces that shaped the growth and development of American towns, cities, and suburbs, while providing full description, analysis, and interpretation of buildings and their architects. Accessible and engaging, American Architecture continues to set the standard as a guide, study, and reference.

Exporting American Architecture 1870-2000

Exporting American Architecture 1870-2000

Author: Jeffrey W. Cody

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135804879

Category: Architecture

Page: 228

View: 696

The export of American architecture began in the nineteenth century as a disjointed set of personal adventures and commercial initiatives. It continues today alongside the transfer of other aspects of American life and culture to most regions of the world. Jeffrey Cody explains how, why and where American architects, planners, building contractors and other actors have marketed American architecture overseas. In so doing he provides a historical perspective on the diffusion of American building technologies, architectural standards, construction methods and planning paradigms. Using previously undocumented examples and illustrations, he shows how steel-frame manufacturers shipped their products abroad enabling the erection of American-style skyscrapers worldwide by 1900 and how this phase was followed by similar initiatives by companies manufacturing concrete components.

Early American Architecture

Early American Architecture

Author: Hugh Morrison

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486254920

Category: Architecture

Page: 642

View: 833

Comprehensive survey of domestic and public architecture ranges from primitive cabins to Greek Revival mansions of the early 1800s. Nearly 500 illustrations. "Entertaining, vigorous, and clearly written." ? The New York Times.

Source Book of American Architecture

Source Book of American Architecture

Author: G.E. Kidder Smith

Publisher: Princeton Architectural Press

ISBN: 1568982542

Category: Architecture

Page: 718

View: 469

This comprehensive and insightful illustrated survey of 500 of America's most distinguished buildings provides a unique overview of the thousand-year architectural development of the United States. It examines our nation's architecture from its earliest days to the present, ranging from cliff dwellings in Mesa Verde to Frank Lloyd Wright's Robie House in Chicago to James Ingo Freed's Holocaust Museum in Washington. Indispensable in any library, it also serves as a general introduction to American architecture or as a splendid guide for tourists.

American Architects and the Mechanics of Fame

American Architects and the Mechanics of Fame

Author: Roxanne Kuter Williamson

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292762909

Category: Architecture

Page: 298

View: 870

Why does one talented individual win lasting recognition in a particular field, while another equally talented person does not? While there are many possible reasons, one obvious answer is that something more than talent is requisite to produce fame. The "something more" in the field of architecture, asserts Roxanne Williamson, is the association with a "famous" architect at the moment he or she first receives major publicity or designs the building for which he or she will eventually be celebrated. In this study of more than six hundred American architects who have achieved a place in architectural histories, Williamson finds that only a small minority do not fit the "right person–right time" pattern. She traces the apprenticeship connection in case studies of Louis Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright, Henry Hobson Richardson, the firm of McKim, Mead & White, Latrobe and his descendants, the Bulfinch and Renwick Lines, the European immigrant masters, and Louis Kahn. Although she acknowledges and discusses the importance of family connections, the right schools, self-promotion, scholarships, design competition awards, and promotion by important journals, Williamson maintains that the apprenticeship connection is the single most important predictor of architectural fame. She offers the intriguing hypothesis that what is transferred in the relationship is not a particular style or approach but rather the courage and self-confidence to be true to one's own vision. Perhaps, she says, this is the case in all the arts. American Architects and the Mechanics of Fame is sure to provoke thought and comment in architecture and other creative fields.